Homeschooling: Yes/No/Pros/Cons

Kellie - posted on 08/06/2011 ( 238 moms have responded )

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I'm starting to think I'd like to Homeschool my daughter (and any future kiddies).



There are a few reasons I'm thinking I'd like to do this, to minimise her risk of bullying (which lets face it is a huge issue), to make sure she doesn't fall through the cracks and has the attention she needs to do well and so on.



However, the lack of social interaction worries me. Humans (for the most part) are social creatures and need outside stimulation and friends to interact and play with.



For those of you who homeschool, What are your reasons for Homeschooling and do you feel your child/ren have the balance needed to be well rounded people, and do they have friends and social interactions outside their family?



For those who go the traditional route, What are your reasons for sending your child/ren to the traditional school setting and do you feel they have the balance needed to be well rounded people, and do they have enough family time?



I have plenty of time to make a final decision, but I like to (for the most part) do my research and inform myself well. I don't really like surprises.



Edited to Add another Question:



To those that Homeschool, Did you start right off the bat or did/do your Kids go to Kindy first.

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April - posted on 08/08/2011

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i just want to say i'm a fan of Tara's too! i think your (Tara's) quote is a Chinese proverb, but don't quote me on that! i learned about it in school and it wasn't the involved kind of learning, lol. it was the "memorize the presidents for next week's test" kind of learning! :P

Sherri - posted on 08/08/2011

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My kids go to public school and I couldn't imagine homeschooling my kids. They could NEVER get the education from me that they are getting from school. We live in an amazing school dist. ranked #5 in the entire US.

I also feel that learning how to deal with others is part of life. Including how to deal with the occasional bully, I feel I would be doing them an disservice by protecting them from every person or little thing that they may not like or could be mean. They will deal with such things and people their entire lives.

Krista - posted on 08/08/2011

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Yeah, I think Tara should just start her own school, teaching other moms HOW to homeschool. Your kids are really, really lucky.

Tara - posted on 08/08/2011

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Thanks ladies.

I love my life and wouldn't trade our lifestyle for a traditional one.

I love the freedom that comes with homeschooling. We can wake up on a beautiful spring day when it's warm and everything is greening up and we can just have a nice breakfast and go for a walk to observe the world waking up after a long winter.

I love that we can decide to just jump in the van and go for a road trip to visit other homeschoolers, just because we want to.

I love that my kids all feel excellent about their abilities. They all have confidence and feel sure in their place in the world. I love that they can hold their own when talking with anyone, from the elderly lady who lives across the road and had a stroke so talks a little differently, the librarians who they love and bake cookies for, to the disabled man who walks around town telling everyone about the weather.

I love that they can go off to theatre camp, not knowing anyone and be confident in their ability to be themselves without fear of "not fitting in". They are who they are, all the time.

They don't feel the need to alter their appearance or personality based on their peer group. They don't spend time worrying about whether their hair is just right or whether their jeans are the right label. etc.



I like that when they are learning, they are learning things using the three primary learning modalities. They are not all visual, learners, nor are they all kinesthetic, nor auditory learners. However by allowing them as many ways as possible to learn about any concept in math, any written work, any art, anything.... allows that information to be stored in many different places in their brains. This leads to core learning. Core learning is the stuff you never forget. Peripheral learning is what takes place a lot of the time when only one style of teaching is used.



Peripheral learning means that you can force a child to remember the dates and names of former Presidents or Prime Ministers, they can then regurgitate that info onto a test or quiz. They move onto another aspect of history and then later will forget the information they were forced to learn. This is a waste of time and brain power, and their brains *will* trim any connections made that are not used.

So really the goal of education should be to form lasting neural connections throughout the brain. I feel this is best accomplished by allowing kids to learn at their own rate, and more importantly learn what interests them, guide them into things that support their curiosity about everything and observe them.



"Tell me and I will forget. Show me and I may learn, Involve me and I will always remember" ~~ read it somewhere can't remember where. But it's so true.



It's not for everyone and we all have different reasons for doing it, and we all do it differently.

I want well rounded, happy, confident and secure children, who grow into happy, confident, self assured adults. I know that homeschooling/unschooling is allowing that to happen, naturally at their own pace.



btw, if you don't know the ages of my kids,

my oldest will be 18 in a month, 15, 11, 8, 6 and 20 months.

They are all wonderful, smart, articulate, confident kids. One would be labeled "shy" at school.

One would be labeled "hyper active" at school.

One would have been told she was failing at reading if she were at school. (which she wasn't she just saw no need to read at that time, and reads voraciously now.)

One would be tired as a dog at school.

At home I know my kids, I know when they learn things better, day or night, I know when they have had enough of a subject and need to take a break, and I know what drives them to love learning. Which is my best tool!!

Merry - posted on 08/08/2011

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Tara I'd love you to teach my kids too! I think I can learn alot from you :)

Jenny - posted on 08/08/2011

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Tara, the more I read your posts, the more I want to quit my job and unschool my kids. I feel I could unleash so much more potential then they are receiving in the public system. I do really like working though and am not sure I would be happy in that situation. Can you just move to BC already?

Tara - posted on 08/08/2011

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Hi Kellie.
I've been homeschooling/unschooling my 6 kids for over 8 years now.
There are as many ways to do it as there are ways to parent.
I don't have a ton of time right now, but there are awesome sites on the net about homeschooling.
As for socialization, you are right we are social animals, but when we are small our social circle needs to be made up of closely tied people. People who have a vested interested in that child's emotional, physical and mental health. Family and extended family etc. when they are school age, or pre-school age, they need times with other children, they need structured interactions so they can learn appropriate social responses etc. and that is easily done through play dates, extra curricular activities such as skating, soccer etc. and through informal play such as public swims, drama groups, social circles. Most homeschoolers I know belong to some kind of collective, usually getting together for field trips, group projects, science fairs, drama productions, musical productions, dance classes etc. etc. etc.
Socialization is the "s" word for most homeschoolers, because honestly the "socialization" attained at school does not mimic the kinds of social environments children will live in as adults very well.
Homeschooled kids generally are out and about in their communities, engaging and interacting with people from all age groups, back grounds, abilities etc. this (in my opinion) creates a more socially balanced person.

Learning at home does not mean recreating a school atmosphere. I think you probably get that already.

The social stuff will come if you provide opportunities for it. If you shelter your kids at home and don't join or take part in educational, creative, productive activities with other home learners or just other kids, ie:skating lessons etc. than that is a disservice to your children.
If however you take the time to find and join others who have similar interests and make sure your kids are doing things that allow them to develop positive social skills through appropriate avenues, you will give them valuable skills that can be transferred to any situation.

Ok, gotta go, I'm actually perusing the net for some art curriculum stuff for my 11 year old, who this year decided she wants more formal instructions. So along with some materials for home use, we've also signed her up for a "paint along" class that runs twice a week for an hour each time with a professional artist who will help her hone her natural abilities and discover new ones!!
Be back later to add.
Oh and my older kids were in ps until grade 5 and 2. But all my younger ones have been unschooling their whole lives...

Merry - posted on 08/08/2011

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Kellie, if you think you want to homeschool then I'd assume you already know you are capable. My mom learned along side us, she was no genius! She had acess the teachers manuals and the answer keys so she could answer our questions even if she didn't remember herself.

When we got into higher level maths she was just as confused as us sometimes! We would ask our dad, or there were a few adults at our church who were math wizz and we could always come to them to explain things.

You don't have to be a genius to homeschool!

Now to unschooled like Tara does, you have to be a genius :)

But regular homeschooling with books and tests etc you can teach effectively without remembering everything from your own school days.

Remember teaching degrees aren't compiled of relearning everything you will be teaching, most of the training is in how to handle a large class, how to motivate kids, how to deal with different learning styles of kids, etc

Stifler's - posted on 08/07/2011

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Are they seriously banning recess altogether or just one of them? We had little lunch and big lunch when I was at school.

Kellie - posted on 08/07/2011

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Trust me, if I didn't think I was capable I'd have turfed the idea and not even bothered posting :)

If I think I need a Teaching Degree to better Homeschool, I can simply sit the STAT test at the end of the year and apply for Uni and have a Teaching Degree by about 2014/5 I'm pretty sure it's only a 3 year Degree here.

I wanted varying thoughts both for and against because it's a very new thought and I don't know a lot about what Homeschooling would entail, I am simply educating myself :) I will also google etc.

To the poster above me (sorry I CoM isn't showing your name!), could you not provide a healthy lunch and recess for you child to eat at school? I don't like the idea of banning recess, everyone needs a break!

I still need to look into our schools here (I'm in Australia), particulary in the suburb we are moving too. If they're not good enough that will also play a factor.

Becky - posted on 08/07/2011

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My kids aren't school-aged yet, but as of now, we will be sending them to public school. I don't feel that I am disciplined or organized enough to homeschool and ensure that my kids are learning what they need to be learning. I actually did teach for a year at a school for missionary children in Africa. I taught gr. 1/2 French and jr. high English. And it was hard!! The kids liked me because I was fun and not real strict, but honestly, I don't think they probably learned much that year! I would consider it if my kids were really struggling in public school or I felt their needs weren't being met. However, like Amy mentioned, I plan to be really involved in their education, regardless of where they go to school. Education is very important to me. My husband talks about how he got through highschool without ever having to write a research paper. I have to do all his writing for him now - business letters, etc. Ummmm, no way, jose! If their teachers won't make them learn how to write, then I will!
That said, I will be homeschooling my 3 year old for preschool this year. The main reason for that is that my husband I are disagree on when he should go to school (kindergarten). His birthday is Feb. 14, which is just 2 weeks before our cutoff here - which I think is ridiculously late in the year. My husband thinks he should start when he's 4 1/2 and I think that's way too young. So I said, he's not going to kindergarten at 4 1/2 without a year in preschool - actually preschool, not with me - first. So, he won't go to preschool until next year, and I'll homeschool him this year. So I win. :)

April - posted on 08/07/2011

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i thought of a few other reasons i like homeschooling: the food is so much better at home and the kids can exercise more often. here in NY gym class is like once a week. and a few nearby areas did consider eliminating recess!

April - posted on 08/07/2011

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i like homeschooling because it frees up a lot more time for children to pursue their interests. i also like homeschooling because public schools are often concerned with money. when test scores are high enough, school districts can receive money. often this leads to teaching to the test, meaning children are taught only what is going to be on state tests. children aren't given time to learn the material either, they essentially cram for the big tests all year. i can't speak for every state, but i know that is what goes on in NY and nearby PA. i do think it is happening all over the country and i do feel that America's education system is kind of in dire need of upgrading. finally, i also like homeschooling because i don't like the rating our local elementary school has received, which is a 3. i don't think that is a good enough of a school! i don't know what to do. i can't homeschool. i need to get a job! i have a MS degree in education. oh the irony...my future job will be teaching other people's kids instead of my own!

Merry - posted on 08/07/2011

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My husband and I were both homeschooled, me from preschool on, him from Jr high on. He went to public school first, he was horribly bullied and the teachers even hated him because he was always challenging their authority with endless questions of why? He tried a private school but left that when the teacher said don't question me I said it's true so you have to believe it. And he argued that teacher so hard he got detention. On and on many similar situations he was begging to be homeschooled.
My mom asked us at the beginning of each school year if we wanted to go to school we always said no way!
We loved homeschooling.
I'll be teaching my kids at home. I don't worry about socialization, I can let them interact with plenty of kids and adults without using their education time as drama time. Honestly, school is to learn, not to socialize. If kids find time to socialize in school they are likely not working hard enough on their school.
Extra stuff like football or dance or choir or soccer can all be done no matter where they learn.
I went to a private school one year, my junior year, right after my mom died and I made no friends, I didn't want friends because I wanted to be home schooled. I had friends from church and from sports and from our neighborhood and I was mad for my dad putting mein school. So I went to class, paid attention in class, went to my locker, went to the next class etc.
Ate lunch alone by my own choosing.
I got such good grades! I was top of my classes. My teachers loved me and always had great things to say about me. I did my work, learned my material and left out all the high school drama that went on around me.
My dad let me homeschool my senior year :)
So I believe that most of the socialization in schools is working against the learning process. Kids need to concentrate to learn and it's very hard to concentrate in a room full of kids who are half your friends and half your enemies and knowing who's mad at you or who has a crush on you or whose cat died that morning.

In short, I think homeschooling is better for their 'socialization' because it keeps learning and social times separate.

Melissa - posted on 08/07/2011

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i have a friend who is homeschooling due to a child's medical needs and their family is doing it based on their family situation too, and it will be easier for one of them to stay home since one will have to take off a lot of time off for their daughter anyways. However they have thought about it in a variety of ways and posted it on facebook saying they finally came to the decision to homeschool, besides, mom was not going to work anyways, so mom was going to teach her. One thing that got brought up as a criticism towards them was that there is no social interaction, their daughter is 3 now. She is a very bright girl with pleanty of social interaction right now. I defended them in the fact that they are the type of parents who will get their daughter into girl scouts, sports- she can do with her medical needs, and other activities like play groups or such activities. Her dad was involved in various activities through school so i know he would promote it for his daughter. Most people feel it is due to lack of social interaction. Most people home school are far more advance educationally because parents teach based off of what their child strengths and weaknesses are and can teach to push their child. They don't have a whole class to deal wit hdisruptions too. I am a single parent i have to work so i can't afford to stay home with my kids. One part of the decision is can you financially aford to, sometimes 1 parent has to quit their job, or you have to work out your jobs to make it work with a home school schdule. A lot of places will also have activities for home school families too, like community centers, libraries, and activity places too! One person i know who was homeschooled believed his view was the only view and believed he was the only one right. His whole family was like that, i believe that was because he lacked the social resources. His church, he ended up not going to church because his family believed he could go at home! So he pretty much only left the house to shop and date= he met girls online! So the more chances you have to get them out there the better, that is all i have to say, it's good because parents can catter to the kids strengths and weaknesses but get them involved in the community and schools will also sometimes let homeschooled kids participate in extracurriculars too! So there is another thing to look at in the community activities. Just don't shelter them socially!

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See the teachers here are'nt like that, he had ONE teacher that was, she moved his desk with other kids that did participate hoping that would stimulate him into wanting to and with kids that she knew could help him if he didnt understand something, that kind of back fired though because one girl just ended up doing the work for him! He takes absolutly ZERO interest in school or anythin grelating to school, hes there for the food... seriously, ill ask how his day was and he goes on for hours about what they had at lunch! I dont know what to do to get him interested, I lov eto read and learn something new so I try to get him into it but no, just wants roll his eyes and block ou twhat m yhusband and I tell him. He cant even play a video game without complaining that its too hard and these ar egames made for like 5 and under... hes 9.

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And those are the kind of kids I usually pull aside and ask if they 1) understood the question, 2) knew the anwer, 3) intentionally don't want to speak in class. I let those kids know that I will ask them to respond in one way or another, even if it's a non-verbal response like a 'thumbs up' or something. Every kid needs to be engaged and participating. I also have begun to figure out my shy or new kids, and try to match them up with other similar kids.

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Sharon, my son is like that. He has a hard time making friends, never wants to participate during class, I went to pick him up earlt on eday last year and I was standing outside the door watching them all and the teacher asked a question and more than half the kids' hands shot up to answer but not my son's he was just sitting there head and eyes wandering the room like the teacher was'nt even there

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I think people tend to equate homeschooling and lack of socialiation as the only negative reprucussion. While it *may* be true for some isolated homeschooling families, the same *may* be true for a student in my high school of 1700+ kids. There may be kids who are shy, wllflowers, never engage in attepting to make friends, shrink back and say nothing in class. These are teh kids I woul dbe more worried about in a public school setting as opposed to a child at home with the paren tin a homeschool setting.

Amie - posted on 08/07/2011

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Oh and socialization, is not a concern. Even without school they are involved in many activities. Some of their friends (and even family friends now) have come about because of these activities.

Amie - posted on 08/07/2011

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My children attend public school. I can't fathom teaching them from home, I don't have as quick as access to the added learning tools our oldest two need. The schools have it all at their disposable at no cost to us.

My kids didn't fall through the cracks, though they very well could have if I was not as involved as I was. I was the biggest push to make sure mine were not forgotten. I do know a home schooling family whose children fell through the cracks. I can also see a lot of it is because of how we dealt with the situations. I worked with the school and specialists to make sure my children got everything they needed. I did not demand it and then just expect it all to happen.

I think that's where a lot of people go wrong with school. Just because your children are enrolled does not mean your job ends where the teachers begins. If you do it that way, you have a higher chance of failing your child. I see parents who don't mean to do this but end up doing it also. Sometimes it's circumstances but it's often not.

Our oldest has ADHD and dyslexia, she's going into grade 6 this year. She has been off her meds for a year, she is on track with her age group, she loves to learn and she's socialable. She is a much different story than many I hear about other families in the similar situations. It took a lot of work and organization to make sure nothing was missed and we stayed on track.

Our son, is still a work in process. However, he is improving as rapidly as his sister did. In a few years time I fully expect to have a similar result.

I also noticed that every once in awhile the teachers would catch something we didn't, just because we are our children's parents and are with them all the time. That is a huge help when you're trying to help children with added needs.

I also know, in a small way, I am lucky for the teachers my children have had so far. All of them care very much for their students. They do what they can and I see their frustrations when other families could do a bit more but don't.

I'm sure homeschooling is fine for some people. For a "normal" child, it may just be the answer if a parent is capable of taking it on. In a few cases it might even be doable for children with added needs so long as the parents continually educate themselves on how to help their children. I'm not even sure where to begin on how the public school system helped to "rewire" our daughters brain so she could learn "around" her learning disabilities. I know I couldn't do it, I know that because I don't have the education that the teachers who help these students do. I'm sure I could find some resources but it still doesn't make up for the experience that these people have.

Amie - posted on 08/07/2011

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My children attend public school. I can't fathom teaching them from home, I don't have as quick as access to the added learning tools our oldest two need. The schools have it all at their disposable at no cost to us.

My kids didn't fall through the cracks, though they very well could have if I was not as involved as I was. I was the biggest push to make sure mine were not forgotten. I do know a home schooling family whose children fell through the cracks. I can also see a lot of it is because of how we dealt with the situations. I worked with the school and specialists to make sure my children got everything they needed. I did not demand it and then just expect it all to happen.

I think that's where a lot of people go wrong with school. Just because your children are enrolled does not mean your job ends where the teachers begins. If you do it that way, you have a higher chance of failing your child. I see parents who don't mean to do this but end up doing it also. Sometimes it's circumstances but it's often not.

Our oldest has ADHD and dyslexia, she's going into grade 6 this year. She has been off her meds for a year, she is on track with her age group, she loves to learn and she's socialable. She is a much different story than many I hear about other families in the similar situations. It took a lot of work and organization to make sure nothing was missed and we stayed on track.

Our son, is still a work in process. However, he is improving as rapidly as his sister did. In a few years time I fully expect to have a similar result.

I also noticed that every once in awhile the teachers would catch something we didn't, just because we are our children's parents and are with them all the time. That is a huge help when you're trying to help children with added needs.

I also know, in a small way, I am lucky for the teachers my children have had so far. All of them care very much for their students. They do what they can and I see their frustrations when other families could do a bit more but don't.

I'm sure homeschooling is fine for some people. For a "normal" child, it may just be the answer if a parent is capable of taking it on. In a few cases it might even be doable for children with added needs so long as the parents continually educate themselves on how to help their children. I'm not even sure where to begin on how the public school system helped to "rewire" our daughters brain so she could learn "around" her learning disabilities. I know I couldn't do it, I know that because I don't have the education that the teachers who help these students do. I'm sure I could find some resources but it still doesn't make up for the experience that these people have.

Erin - posted on 08/07/2011

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I love the idea of homeschooling, and have no concerns for socialisation (that's what sport, clubs and homeschooling groups are for!).

But I would never do it. I simply don't have the patience, nor am I creative enough to provide a stimulating learning environment. She already comes home from daycare talking about things they did, and my reaction is always 'shit I would never have thought to do that!'.

I did well at school. I was at a G & T school and went on to uni. But I would make for a hopeless homeschooler, and I recognise that limitation.

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I have been a public school teacher for 16 years now, so naturally I support public schools. Ironically, I would never imagine wanting to homeschool my son!

As an only child, I have always felt it was important form a very young age to be around peers and playmates. Now he is active in sports like karate & basketball. While his male cousins are also close in age and they all attend the same school, we know this does not make up for a sibling. But we also keep plenty busy when school is not in session! We love doing science experiments and we are lucky that my son is a natural learner. He just LOVES school, but there is no way I could homeschool. I have no background in early elementary education and I would end up frustrating myself!

However, I most certainly respect homeschooling families that actually do homeschool for whatever their reason. I don't respect parents who enroll and pull their kids out of 4 different schools in a 6 month time frame and then just say "oh, I'm homeschooling" and ultimately don't. The child suffers immensely. I have also seen homeschooled kids re-enter public education, and most have done well. I can only recall one homeschooled student who was quite ill re-enter public school, and school phobia just about killed her. It was the wrong setting. Mother pushed it becasue she was done homeschooling. But that seems to be an isolated example. Whatever educational choices you make for your child, it's your job as a parent to research. Research schools in your area, public, private & charters. Research homeschooling groups. Talk to parents of all educational settings to determine the best placement for your child. Good luck!

Stifler's - posted on 08/06/2011

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I'll be enrolling my kids in school. I don't want them home 24/7! Jeez. Also I read to my kids and am excellent at English but I am really bad at maths and other stuff so they will be going to school so they can be smart and I'll be making them do their homework. My parents never made me do my homework. I'd just quickly do it on the bus or the morning before school and if the answers were wrong at least I "did my homework". Socialization isn't an issue for me. My kid was pretty much socialized from birth, it's not like we sit home all week and all weekend and don't see anyone else.

Rosie - posted on 08/06/2011

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i dont' homeschool for a miriad of reasons. first, i cannot handle it. school is a nice break for me. i cannot imagine having to be around my children and trying (very poorly btw) to get them to pay attention to me and teach them something at the same time. i don't feel i would be a very good teacher, which is good since i don't have any type of teaching degree.
second, i firmly believe that they won't get the same life experiences staying home with me as they would by going out and socializing in school. sure they can socialize in other ways, i'm more worried about the situations that can come up in school that i don't feel would come up in a few short moments of time at a playgroup or something.
if you feel you have the determination, and can be around your kids all day everyday, i don't think socialization will be a problem at all. just different i guess. i'd do it if socialization was your only issue with it.

Minnie - posted on 08/06/2011

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We'll be homeschooling 'officially' this September (though we do from birth, don't we?)



We are in order to give our daughters an individualized education- so that they can spend their time persuing their interests, learn at their own paces, delve into things as much as they want.



I'm not concerned about socialization in the least. We just got back from a family reunion at the beach and there were several other family gatherings...I looked around for my five year old to discover her in the midst of another reunion having an avid conversation with a bunch of adults whom she knew not in the slightest, about a handful of feathers she had collected and which birds they came from.



We're a member of a co-op and a couple of other groups. She takes ballet every week, and is quite competent at having conversations with the various people we meet while out and about. I personally don't see sticking a bunch of children together, all of the same age, as the only way to 'socialize' a child.

Johnny - posted on 08/06/2011

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I would never consider homeschooling. I have no training to teach. I know a lot about some stuff, but there is a whole lot about which I have no real clue. I would like to think that I could come up with all sorts of creative projects and lessons, but I am pretty sure my kid would miss out on a lot of stuff. I would end up just sticking to the provided curriculum because I would be concerned about not covering all the necessary bases, and she would miss out. While I think that in some areas I have a great deal to teach my child, in other areas I have little doubt that there are others better suited and I do not think I could fill that void just by taking her on a lot of field trips. I like the idea of my child learning to deal with different people, how other people outside the family act and think, and just figuring out how to negotiate the world outside our home without me always by her side.

She is now in a full-time preschool and loving it. That obviously would not be for every kid, but it's a great fit for her. She adores her teachers, is starting to make friends and I already have noticed her learning all sorts of great new stuff. Just yesterday, when I picked her up I took her to the playground. She climbed up this very steep long metal slide and I was really surprised. The whole time she was doing it she kept saying, "I can do it, I can do it, I can do it" and when she got to the top she yelled, "I did it!!!" When she slid back down I said I thought it was great and she told me that she had "'termination." (determination) That's what she learned about in school this week. What a fantastic lesson. As I said, every kid is different, I could not handle it as a kid, but it's right for her.

I was bullied in elementary school. It was hard. But I think I would have struggled more in life if I hadn't had to learn how to deal with people more as a kid. It may be rough, but I know it served me well. I just do not think that homeschooling and just joining extra-curricular activities provides those same lessons. School can be a lonely battleground. And that teaches a lot of very necessary lessons. Homeschooling kids can do better in the short run, but many I have known have struggled in the long run. I know my child would, so it's not a decision I would make. Plus, I'm not at all convinced that I am the best person to be anything other than her mother.

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Is your only concern the social aspect? If that's the only negative you can see, then you should homeschool. Kids don't need school to socialize. Put her in dance class or girl scouts. Join a homeschool co-op.

I've considered homeschooling. As of right now, my children will attend public school. There are a lot of reasons for that decision, and there is time for me to change my mind. But the social aspect wasn't what made me decide to put my kids in public school. ;)

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:) yeah id like that.. I only wonder if some kind of daycare was offered lol, my husband works nights so he needs to sleep some during the day and I dont have a baby sitter. But yes it would be great for the social part of it :)

Kellie - posted on 08/06/2011

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LOL how funny are they!

SO that might just cover the "social" aspect of it then. I'd have to look into it all a lot more and in my area/country too. But I think I'm liking it more and more, especially if there are groups like that available.

Gives me time to work on her Daddy lol

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Lol, yeah my two, almost three year old is like that also, im actually kind of scared for when the day comes that she can go to school. That girl answer's to no one (not even me). My husband doesnt think its a good idea but if I did decide to go with it he would be alright :) I have heard that there are learning groups you could attend, where each mom teaches a different subject.

Kellie - posted on 08/06/2011

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It is isn't it. Not that I'm under any romantic illusions of it all being sugar and spice and all that's nice mind you.

My daughter is 8 months and is already extremely willfull/headstrong/stubborn/singleminded and has an excellently developed selective hearing abilities. It's going to take a strong person to guide her and teach her WITHOUT breaking her, and I'm not sure the schooling system is going to be the right path for her.

However, there is plenty of time for me to go over this in my own head before putting it to my partner, it's just good to hear about these things from others :)

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Got ya. I would really love to homeschool but I honestly dont think it would be good for either of my oldest kids if I did. I think they would get it in their heads that they dont really have to pay attention and earn because its mom being the teacher. The idea is a very nice one though.

Kellie - posted on 08/06/2011

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Oh yeah, you just made me realise I forgot to add that I know I can't (and don't want to), put her in a bubble and shield her from the world and experiences.

I totally want her to go out and experience the good, bad and ugly (it ALL make us who we are). I know and accept I can't protect her from everything Brandi, there's so much I like about the idea of Homeschooling but I'm just starting to realise it, so those were the couple of reasons I could think of off the top of my head and by no means in any order of significance.

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I do not homeschool. I have been thinking about homeschooling for quit a while though, there are alot of things I'd like my children to learn that they wont in school and there are things I dont want my child to be taught in school.



But my big thing is the social aspect, he has a hard time making friends as it is (really shy quiet boy). I dont want to yank him away from the friends he has made and make him feel secluded. As for bullying , it doesnt happen to him anymore, sure there are kids that dont want to play with him sometimes, but there are also times he doesnt want to play with someone. Thats healthy for kids its ok. As much as we'd like to we cant put our kids in a bubble,that would do more harm than good in the end. Evey kid goes through a bullying/being bullied period, IF it is not causing any real physical harm, thats just a part of growing up.

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