How do YOU choose... with or without research?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 12/07/2010 ( 14 moms have responded )

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Ok, I was part of a similiar debate about 3 weeks ago, and this question came to mind, specifically becouse of how people were responding to something I said...so here it goes..

How do you decide what kind of dog breed to bring into your home? Do you do research finding out the best tempermant, best family breeds, dogs that are kid friendly...or do you just go and find a pup that looks cute and take a chance on the breed?

This goes really for any pet you want to bring into your family, but I am gearing this more towards dogs...becouse of the responces (of MANY) from a coment I made..I said something along the lines of "Chow Chows are an aggressive breed, and Pitbuls have aggressive tendencies". Now this question has been nagging me for quite some time....if you do not want to "stereotype" a certain breed, what criteria, if any do you use before bringing a pet around your priceless children?

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Jocelyn - posted on 12/07/2010

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We have a pitbull. That's what my hubby wanted. I was a little concerned (because let's face it, she's a pitbull lol) but I did do a LOT of research before making a commitment. But she is an absolute perfect dog. The kids will hang off her neck, or sit on her (Brooklynn climbed from the couch onto her back last night and just sat there--until she fell off lol). She's so calm and she puts up with a lot from our kids. That being said, I don't leave the kids and the dog alone together, and Kila only has the one chance. If she bites my kids, then she's gone.
Horrible dogs can come from ANY breed, so I base my decisions mainly on the personality of the dog, but I don't completely disregard the stereotypes.

Rosie - posted on 12/07/2010

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yes because there is some truth to it. just as there is truth to the ability of labs/retreivers to consume everything they get their eyes on. i can't tell you how many times scooby has shit out a complete sock.

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Jodi - posted on 12/07/2010

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Having worked in an animal shelter in years past, I would have to say that stereotyping isn't the safest bet for picking a dog. Yes, do research and find out what breeds are prone to heart worm, diabetis, respiratory stuff, what kind of grooming (if any) is necessary and what kind of excercise they need. BUT, as for aggressiveness, I would inquire about and/or as for a temperament test to be given to the dog I was looking at. It finds out how they react to children, other pets, men, women, territorial tendancies (mostly with food) and other qualities. It's individualized per dog, not per breed so you know what kind of individual you are bringing home, not just that it's a pitbul that may or may not like kids etc. So, yes, I would research, but I would also ask for a temperament test to be performed, always the best to be informed on any big decisions in life!



edit to add: ANY dog from any place can have a temperament test, not just shelter dogs. I just know that in our local shelter a temperament test is standard before any dog is even put up for availability of adoption.

LaCi - posted on 12/07/2010

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All dogs are capable of biting, but a dogs behavior and attitude are reliant on the owners ability to handle that dog. That being said, having a small child I choose dogs accordingly. I have nothing against dogs like, say, a pitbull, but knowing how powerful that particular dog is, I'm not taking chances on it with a small child around. I probably won't bring any dog into the house until he's bigger, 5 or 6 years old when I might finally get my english bulldog with an awesomely adorable underbite. When he's older and I feel better about it, I'll bring in a husky or a malamute. I'm aware of the potential dangers associated with my favorite breeds, and that's how I decide WHEN I should bring it into my home. It's not really a question of whether I will or won't, just when I think my son is at an age at which the breed may be more appropriate. My kid prefers cats though. I don't think he has much interest at all in dogs. So it may not even matter, he'd probably just ignore the dogs anyway.





*oh, and with the bulldog I'm more concerned for the safety of the dog than the kid. Seems like being around 40lb toddlers that climb and jump off everything would be very very bad for mr bow(wow)ser t. bulldog.

Lyndsay - posted on 12/07/2010

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I just take a chance on the breed. I know which dogs I don't like (little ones) so I will go with whatever looks nice, or whatever is affordable. The dog I have now is a pitbull I rescued from a neglectful home where she was left alone with two other dogs for days on end... she is the most well behaved dog I have ever seen in my life, she is excellent with my son and she is excellent with all people. She doesn't like other dogs very much but she's not an attack dog by any means. I'm very happy with my choice and although I would never get another pitbull (they are just so stupid looking) I'm glad that she's part of the family.

Jenny - posted on 12/07/2010

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Oh and on the research. I did research breeds before chooosing our first dog. I also interviewed a few different breeders. We chose a litter with a particular bloodline we like and waited about 6 months before we got to choose our puppy. We had first pick male and visited the litter a few times before Duece picked us. He was the one constantly hanging around me and my partner and there was no way he wasn't coming home with us. My female I actually chose from a litter over the internet. The first time I met her was when I picked her up from the airport. While I love her I won't pick a puppy again before meeting it in person first.

Jenny - posted on 12/07/2010

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I have 2 APBT's. I chose the breed for several reasons. They are eager to please their masters, actually they are near the point of obsession with their masters. They are great with children. They have a high pain tolerance which is good with babies around who like to pull tails and poke. They are low maintenance for grooming. They have bomb proof temperments when trained properly. They provide endless hours of entertainent with their shenanigans. My favourite is watching them barrel through and sproing around in the snow. They keep my safe when my partner is working out of town.



I enjoy other breeds, my next dog will be a Boston Terrier but I will always own at least one APBT. They are the total package in the dog world.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 12/07/2010

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Thanks Sharon...funny about the cat story..my son learned quick with the cat to STOP pulling the fluffy tail that keeps tickling him...

~♥Little Miss - posted on 12/07/2010

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Thank you Kati, so I gather..yes you will judge on a "stereotype" what breed you will bring into your home with your children.

Sharon - posted on 12/07/2010

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ugh there are stereotypes because there is some truth to them.

when I was a young adult my dog of choice was a chow chow. Why? Because its a larger aggressive breed that is very scary to strangers and bonds STRONGLY with its owner.

I had no problems reading my dogs and didn't bother to socialise them with children as I wasn't ever going to have any (stop laughing!)

Imagine my consternation when the claims of 3 doctors were proven wrong and I found out I was pregnant. My diagnosing doctor had to give me the news from behind a wall so I wouldn't slug her. (I had been tested for every kind of cancer, disease, etc because ALL my records said I couldn't have kids, for over 2 months at this point.)

I DID manage to associate my chows with my baby but I NEVER left them alone. Its not as hard as people think. Shut the dogs outside while you shower, in a room or close the door to the babys' room.

AFTER my mother claimed them (long story and it was mutual and a relief) my husband was a FIRM believer in labradors as a family pet. I was not happy with the idea of a short haired dog.

RESEARCH AND GOOD BREEDING do not lie. i would NEVER have worried about leaving our labradors alone with our infants or toddlers. One day my 3 year old was playing on the couch. I'd warned him over and over that he was gonna fall off and get hurt. Finally he turned around to get down. Instead of climbing off the couch like I expected, he suddenly launched himself into the air and landed with both feet on the ribs of our labrador. OMG. 1. dog is gonna tear the head off the toddler. 2. dog is gonna have broken ribs. 3. I'm gonna need stitches after prying his teeth off the toddlers' legs.

The dog screamed, the toddler burst into tears, I was sprawled UNELEGANTLY across the floor and no where within of either and the dog gave me a dirty look and went back to sleep.

THAT is an awesome dog. IF he had bitten the child, I wouldn't have blamed the dog one tiny bit.

When it came to our cats, I was a firm believer in "let the kid fuck with the cat, they'll soon learn not to." My boys were quick learners. My daughter looked like a war camp refugge who climbed through three rafts of razor wire for nearly a year.

Stereo type away. If you don't have the ability to read a dog well, fall back on the personality standard.

But breeding is very important. ugh i don't have time to go into more details... I gotta shower and get to work. Good luck Kate C.

Rosie - posted on 12/07/2010

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i actually decided our dog based off of temperment. he's a lab retriever mix. very loyal, very friendly, very good with kids. plus i think they are adorable animals.

i have heard pit bulls to be more aggressive, and i just won't take that chance with my children, so i steered clear of that breed. i wouldn't get any breed known for agresiveness. and yes i understand not all dogs of that particular breed are going to be agressive, i just won't take that chance with my family. plus i think most of the more aggresive dogs are ugly anyway, hehe. pitbulls, german shepherds, boxers, chihuahuas, all ugly to me. chows are kindof cute, but meh, i like my scooby. :)

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