legalization of pot

Isobel - posted on 09/25/2009 ( 42 moms have responded )

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I can't remember what exact thread we were on the other night but a few of you inspired me...give 'er

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Johnny - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Jodi:




I see the point of decreased violence, etc, but full legalisation will also send a message to our children that it is ok.  We are already on a losing battle trying to teach our children not to smoke, and responsible use of alcohol, because they are legal substances.  Imagine the message that would be sent by legalising marijuana.  Decriminilise it, certainly, but I have a problem with legalisation at so many levels.





I would have to disagree with you on this, although I don't know about the situation in Australia.  Here in Canada, we have been having quite a bit of success bringing down the smoking and drinking rates for teenagers (still struggling with binge drinking 20 somethings though).  Strong education campaigns starting before they are teenagers, like when they'll actually listen, seems to be having an effect.  But right now, there is not a lot of marijuana educuation, and a recent survery suggested a large percentage of teenagers actually believe that marijuana is healthy(!!! - if anyone is interested, I'll try to find it).  I'd like to hope that part of legalizing it would include broader education campaigns about it's risks.  Because telling kids that marijuana is just as dangerous as coke and heroin isn't working.  First of all, they know it's not true, so then they don't believe you when you tell them that it does do bad things.  A fact-based marijuana education could perhaps lower the number of kids doing pot.  Around here, they do it more than smoking or drinking.  Because it is illegal, it's easier for them to get.

Johnny - posted on 09/26/2009

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Marijuana is the main source of revenue for our local criminal gangs. They run huge grow-operations here, and export all over Canada and the US. Much of the marijuana in the Northwest US comes from right here. In exchange for the pot, our gangsters get cocaine and illegal weapons. I'm very much simplifying the situation, but suffice to say, if pot was legalized in Canada and the US, many people here, including many law enforcement officials and politicians, believe that our criminal gangs would have a far harder time getting their hands on guns and cocaine to sell locally. Last year, our region suffered a huge gang war in which many murders (including that of 3 innocent people) occurred using the illegal firearms which these gang members traded marijuana for. Legalize it, let people grow their own. It's just as bad as alcohol and cigarettes. In my view, booze is worse because it can make the drinker violent (who has every seen a pot-induced brawl?). Take away some of the money-making capabilities from criminal gangs and see if things get better. It is at least worth the experiment. We can always go back if it's a mess. But prohibition never did come back despite all of the dire warnings from the temperance promoters.

Sorry for the rambling, my thoughts are a bit jumbled this evening.

[deleted account]

Quoting Jodi:

Yep, and let's see marijuana coming out of the black economy.....like that's going to happen. If you legalise it, then that means we can all grow it ourselves, right? After all, it is a natural product that can be very easily cultivated......So how, exactly, do you propose it be taxed?



Marajuana is actually not really difficult to grow. But the point of "regulate" is just like alcohol-you should have to have a liscense to grow it, and cops should be able to bust people for "making" (growing) it illegally. This regulates the amount of contaminants in the plant (which are often what causes the health problems involved) and allows it to be taxed (growers can either directly sell it to people or they can sell to businesses that then sell it to clients.)

Jodi - posted on 09/25/2009

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Okay, a few facts:



Marijuana decreases the body's ability to fight diseases.

People who smoke marijuana often develop the same kinds of breathing problems that cigarette smokers have including coughing and wheezing. They tend to have more chest colds than nonusers. They are also at greater risk of getting lung infections like pneumonia.

Smoking marijuana decreases blood flow to the brain.

Studies have shown that marijuana lowers testosterone levels in men.

Marijuana use can also lower sperm counts, possibly resulting in difficulty having children.

Females who use marijuana, over time, increase their levels of testosterone which can result in increased facial hair and acne. It may also adversely affect reproductive functioning in women.



Do you think collecting the taxes would be worth the additional pressure on the health system? If it is legalised, it is essentially the system saying "it's ok for you to go and smoke it". Currently, the fact that it is illegal is what stops people using it in the first place. By making it legal, and far more readily available, it will increase usage.



I do understand what you are trying to say, that cigarettes and alcohol are bad for you and also put pressure on the healthy system, but why introduce another substance into this system which essentially creates the same level of long-term health problem when the governments of many countries are already trying to restrict access/social acceptability of cigarettes and alcohol? What sort of sense does it make to legalise it and then start the adverts telling you how bad it is for you?

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Tracy - posted on 09/27/2009

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Quoting Jodi:



Quoting Carol:



Around here, they do it more than smoking or drinking.  Because it is illegal, it's easier for them to get.










See, this is where I can't understand that it will be harder for them to get if it is legal.  People will still grow it in their backyards (or wherever else), if they can't get it legally.  Legalising it will not make it any harder to get hold of. 






I have read all the posts and would to totally agree with Jodi. You have taken the words out of my mouth :)

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Carol:


Around here, they do it more than smoking or drinking.  Because it is illegal, it's easier for them to get.






See, this is where I can't understand that it will be harder for them to get if it is legal.  People will still grow it in their backyards (or wherever else), if they can't get it legally.  Legalising it will not make it any harder to get hold of. 

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Natalie:

Laura, I'm interested to know why you don't think marijuana will be able to be taxed. I mean, I can imagine some problems in making a transition from black market to legitimate retail, but we're able to tax other things in various ways, so why not marijuana?

In my area, it is decriminalized, so if you get caught with it, all that happens is it's taken away and you might have to pay a fine. It's still a federal crime though, so dealers can still get busted. I don't think the feds really care about small time users though, so most people aren't affected. In general, I don't really see more users or people who seem like users than I did back in Alabama where I'm originally from. There, people might spend up to six months in jail for possession of less that a gram. What I gather from this is that legalization probably wouldn't cause a huge spike in usage.

Carol, I think the potential benefit of reduced gang violence and cocaine use are excellent points! That right there is enough reason for me, what are we waiting for?


I don't have a problem with decriminilisation for possession.  It's pretty much the case where I am too.  However, how can you tax something you can grow in your backyard?  No-one taxes me for my vegetable garden, although I could buy these things in the local store and it would be taxed.  Same thing. 



I see the point of decreased violence, etc, but full legalisation will also send a message to our children that it is ok.  We are already on a losing battle trying to teach our children not to smoke, and responsible use of alcohol, because they are legal substances.  Imagine the message that would be sent by legalising marijuana.  Decriminilise it, certainly, but I have a problem with legalisation at so many levels.

Natalie - posted on 09/26/2009

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Laura, I'm interested to know why you don't think marijuana will be able to be taxed. I mean, I can imagine some problems in making a transition from black market to legitimate retail, but we're able to tax other things in various ways, so why not marijuana?

In my area, it is decriminalized, so if you get caught with it, all that happens is it's taken away and you might have to pay a fine. It's still a federal crime though, so dealers can still get busted. I don't think the feds really care about small time users though, so most people aren't affected. In general, I don't really see more users or people who seem like users than I did back in Alabama where I'm originally from. There, people might spend up to six months in jail for possession of less that a gram. What I gather from this is that legalization probably wouldn't cause a huge spike in usage.

Carol, I think the potential benefit of reduced gang violence and cocaine use are excellent points! That right there is enough reason for me, what are we waiting for?

Isobel - posted on 09/26/2009

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I don't think they will ever be able to tax marijuana if it becomes legal.

I do think it's harmful and addictive for some users.

But I also think that is wasteful to prosecute people for using it. Decriminalization seems to make the most sense.

This thread is nowhere as funny as I thought it would be ;)

Natalie - posted on 09/26/2009

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One of the things about the health issues with marijuana is that it's really difficult to do a study when the subject is illegal to possess or use. My understanding is that (at least in the US) the results for many studies of marijuana are based on data from self reported users. These users may or may not be using the weed in conjunction with other substances, which could affect the outcomes. So I don't think we can really conclusively say whether or not pot is a huge detriment to our health (though yeah, it probably is not so good for us to ever breathe in smoke). There are just too many variables and contradictory results. We can't justify keeping it illegal when at worst, the effects of the drug are on par with two legal substances: alcohol and tobacco.

Let's legalize it. Like alcohol and- increasingly- cigarettes, it should be used only on the premises of an authorized seller, or in the privacy of one's own home. We should tax the hell out of it- healthcare, research, and education are all areas that I think would benefit from this money. That revenue could also go towards curbing illegal importation of drugs into the US. Again taking a cue from alcohol and tobacco sales, growers, distributors, and sellers would have to obtain and maintain a specific license in order to sell it. If they did not, they would be subject to fines and be shut down if they did not get the license after being busted the first time.

Will there still be weed on the black market? Probably. Underage users? Almost definitely. We see the same thing with alcohol and cigarettes, but that is not enough reason to make them illegal. Marijuana should be treated the same way. A lot of the crime associated with pot is a result it being illegal- people take revenge for getting narced on, dealers rip people off by giving less than what buyers pay for, or taking the money and never delivering the goods.

Why should we continue to waste time and resources punishing marijuana users when they are not hurting anyone? Why not turn it around and make it beneficial to our country?

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Laura, I think it was in response to the fact that we could tax it if we legalised it. And we wouldn't need to pay taxes in policing it. However, it has also been pointed out that it would still need to be policed, and there have been arguments that the tax probably wouldn't cover the health care of those who indulge (same as taxing cigarettes and alcohol doesn't cover the health care), so the whole tax argument is a bit of a moot point really, in my opinion. I still think people will grow it anyway. It's already illegal to grow, and people still do it. It won't stop just because we legalise it but make it regulated!!!

Isobel - posted on 09/26/2009

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Sorry Christa...I'm a little confused, what does this have to do with pot? Did you mean to post this on a different thread (distribution of wealth or money)?

Christa - posted on 09/26/2009

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What we should really do is burn all our laws and get rid of our prisons (since they cost the government money), quite paying for police (they cost money too) and just let people run around doing whatever they want. Maybe it would get us out of the recession, eh? Maybe we should just let anyone run around with a gun to....and no need for locks on our cars or homes...cause surely no one would walk in and steal our prized-possessions, right? Heck, maybe we should tell all our government agencies we don't need them either.....THAT WOULD REALLY SAVE US ALOT OF MONEY!!

[deleted account]

Quoting Jodi:



Quoting Diana:

If we stop doing everything that has the potential to cause us problems, then life is going to be dull as all hell-and stinky, from the sounds of recent studies. lol





Diana, I do understand what you mean, but this is not about stopping doing something that is legal.  Why legalise something when we KNOW it actually does cause problems.  When it comes down to it, do you think that cigarettes and alcohol would have been legalised AND glamourised back in the day if they had known the implications?  Of course they wouldn't have.  Back in WWII, the soldiers were given cigarettes as rations!!!  They were encouraged to smoke!!  Many people now would think that is not feasible, but it DID happen.  Back when cigarettes and alcohol became legal no-one actually understood that there were health implications.  The studies hadn't been done.  The studies on marijuana have been done. 






The biggest expense on our health systems today is the result of alcohol and cigarettes (sure there are other issues, and the results of obesity are fast becoming a top health system cost), but WHY introduce another one?  If you check through the costs of the health system, and the contribution  of alcohol and cigarette taxes, you'd probably find that the taxes do not outweigh the costs of the health care.





=) We'll just have to agree to disagree.



Like cigarettes and alcohol, I view this as a personal choice. Maybe it's a personal choice that you should have to pay more taxes...Who knows....But I think you should be able to make it.

Isobel - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Jodi:

Because if it is freely available to grow at a personal level, why do you have to pay tax on it? Ok, maybe you grow an extra few plants. "Personal use". No tax, how do you tax its value? Grow an extra few plants. "Personal use". No crime, no tax. Alcohol is not made in backyards (well, moonshine, home brew maybe). When it is no-one is taxed for it. Sell your handful of homegrown plants, no crime, no business, no tax. And who is going to police what you are growing? Is there going to be a new department in the government who goes and checks out those who register they are growing marijuana? And they will know exactly how much they are growing, and how much they are selling.

I'm sorry, I just can't see it working in any way whatsoever.

Alcohol is sold through underground markets, I don't know about you, but I can't grow a bottle of whiskey in my garden, can you?


first...Mary you WOULD be VERY surprised.  My husband talked me into plantin two splindly little runt plants (I laughed and thought he'd never get more than a joint off of those two plants combined) Within 2 months they were 6 feet around...each.  So yeah Jodi, I've had the same experience as you and it is wretched.  The problem here in Canada you see though, is winter...everyone would run out at the same time...but you're right, if it were legal to grow, everybody would grow more, back yards would be filled with it.

ME - posted on 09/26/2009

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My husband makes and bottles his own beer. It takes anywhere from 6 weeks to 4 months, depending on what he is making. He had to buy all of the equipment, he has to purchase the ingredients every time he makes a new batch, and in the 6 weeks to 4 months it takes him to get to bottled beer, he buys plenty of wine and beer from local markets. I see your point, but I think you are exaggerating the effect. Americans want everything RIGHT NOW! If they can buy it down the street, why go to the trouble of searching for it on the DL? AND even if they do, we still benefit by decriminalizing it, and saving massive amounts of tax dollars on court costs, legal fees, and prison/jail stays.

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Because if it is freely available to grow at a personal level, why do you have to pay tax on it? Ok, maybe you grow an extra few plants. "Personal use". No tax, how do you tax its value? Grow an extra few plants. "Personal use". No crime, no tax. Alcohol is not made in backyards (well, moonshine, home brew maybe). When it is no-one is taxed for it. Sell your handful of homegrown plants, no crime, no business, no tax. And who is going to police what you are growing? Is there going to be a new department in the government who goes and checks out those who register they are growing marijuana? And they will know exactly how much they are growing, and how much they are selling.



I'm sorry, I just can't see it working in any way whatsoever.



Alcohol is sold through underground markets, I don't know about you, but I can't grow a bottle of whiskey in my garden, can you?

ME - posted on 09/26/2009

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Not if it's not a crime. Why would it be? Is alcohol sold through underground markets?

ME - posted on 09/26/2009

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Lets say some ridiculously high number of people (like 60%) grow their own pot. They are still no longer shuffled through the legal system at expense to tax payers, and they still have to buy the supplies from somewhere; grow systems, seeds, etc. The other 40% buys it from local small business owners, creating new jobs, paying taxes, etc. It still seems like a big net gain to me.

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Mary:

Please...I can't keep a house plant alive to save my life. I would never do the work to grow my own...and there would be plenty of others. Would SOME people grow their own, of course, but the majority would not. Give me a break!



You may be surpised Mary :) 

ME - posted on 09/26/2009

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Please...I can't keep a house plant alive to save my life. I would never do the work to grow my own...and there would be plenty of others. Would SOME people grow their own, of course, but the majority would not. Give me a break!

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Yep, and let's see marijuana coming out of the black economy.....like that's going to happen. If you legalise it, then that means we can all grow it ourselves, right? After all, it is a natural product that can be very easily cultivated......So how, exactly, do you propose it be taxed?

ME - posted on 09/26/2009

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Legalize, regulate, tax...People who want to smoke it already do, but are concidered criminals for it. Legalizing would not only make money for our over-burdened, under-revenued systems, but save mone in the US in court and Legal costs. Yes...Marijuana is problematic for people with a propensity for addiction, but for the rest of us, it is not. I have started and stopped smoking dozens of times with no problems or issues to speak of, and most smokers are just like me. Most of my friends have smoked at one time in their lives, many still do, but just as many have "grown up" and quit due to job requirements, family responsibilities, etc. It's time to do it already...save money, make money, decriminalize, help sick people...there are endless benefits!

Jodi - posted on 09/26/2009

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Quoting Diana:

If we stop doing everything that has the potential to cause us problems, then life is going to be dull as all hell-and stinky, from the sounds of recent studies. lol


Diana, I do understand what you mean, but this is not about stopping doing something that is legal.  Why legalise something when we KNOW it actually does cause problems.  When it comes down to it, do you think that cigarettes and alcohol would have been legalised AND glamourised back in the day if they had known the implications?  Of course they wouldn't have.  Back in WWII, the soldiers were given cigarettes as rations!!!  They were encouraged to smoke!!  Many people now would think that is not feasible, but it DID happen.  Back when cigarettes and alcohol became legal no-one actually understood that there were health implications.  The studies hadn't been done.  The studies on marijuana have been done. 



The biggest expense on our health systems today is the result of alcohol and cigarettes (sure there are other issues, and the results of obesity are fast becoming a top health system cost), but WHY introduce another one?  If you check through the costs of the health system, and the contribution  of alcohol and cigarette taxes, you'd probably find that the taxes do not outweigh the costs of the health care.

[deleted account]

I doubt it will increase usage. If you really wanna smoke now, you can and you do.



As with cigs and alcohol I think this one's a personal choice. If a person is willing to undergo those risks then they should be able to. All sorts of medicines are bad for us when absued-even Tylenol can cause liver failure if abused, deodorant has recently been linked to health problems, and we all know what sorts of problems overeating can cause-so really anything can be abused, and anything is harmful if abused. If we stop doing everything that has the potential to cause us problems, then life is going to be dull as all hell-and stinky, from the sounds of recent studies. lol



I get your point, too-not burdening an already overburdened healthcare system. But taxing it creates new revenue for that worn out healthcare system-and not everyone is going to experience those side effects-I've personally met a lot of pot smokers (hey, what else is there to do in a small rural town...drink, smoke, and have sex) and none of them had trouble conceiving (in fact, if they did I'd hate to see how early they had kids without smoking pot-most everyone I grew up with had kids by the time they were 20...lol). Of course, just because I don't see the negative effects doesn't mean they're not there-I'm not so naive as that.



I just think it goes back to personal choices, and this is one that I think people should be allowed to make, since it doesn't harm anyone except the smoker.

[deleted account]

Quoting Jodi:



Quoting Diana:




Quoting Jodi:





Quoting Diana:

I dunno, Laura...I've never heard of someone driving stoned and killing a bunch of people, although I guess it might've happened (?)










Actually, I wouldn't get in a car with someone who was stoned, and I have actually refused to in the past, just as I wouldn't get in a car with someone who has had too much to drink.  They are just as impaired to drive as someone who has been drinking.  I don't know the stats for marijuana usage, but I do know that drugs now kill more people on the roads than alcohol.













Well I didn't say to get in the car with a person who was stoned or that it was a good idea to drive while stoned...I was making the stereotypical (but hey, there are stereotypes for a reason...) point that once someone is stoned they don't *want* to drive-and that I've never heard of someone being killed by a high driver, although it's not totally implausible.









True, my apologies Diana :)  I was just making the point that people DO drive stoned, and quite regularly.  I think if you researched the stats, there would be people who have been killed by a stoned driver.  In my experience (just the people I knew that were heavily into it when we were young), they actually believe they are better drivers when they are stoned, and that is extremely scary.  They used the reasoning that they are more focused, less aggressive, more likely to notice detail, such as someone stepping out on the road, etc.  My argument used to scream in my head, but try to convince them logically that this may be true, but did it occur to them that with their reaction time (and we all know how slow they are), they may as well be drink driving, because it equated to the same result.






haha...It's ok. And I know that they do-I've seen it. But I've never heard of any of them having an accident, although as I said, it's not implausible. We might have a better chance of regulating that though if it were legal and someone could be tested for it when they were pulled over, as with alcohol.

[deleted account]

Quoting Jodi:



Quoting Laura:

I'm surprised I haven't heard yet that it's not addictive...I will say again, no more problematic than alcohol. My ex-husband got to a point where he smoked a joint as soon as he woke up...and on every break at work, then as soon as dinner was done...then as soon as I go the babies down for bed. It got to a point where I didn't know he was stoned, I could only tell he wasn't cause he was throwing things around. I'm not huge against it...I just think that a lot of pot smokers (some of my very best friends) think it's more harmless than it is.






Laura, it is addictive for two reasons (and I have seen studies about it too).  Firstly, similar to cigarette smoking, it is psychologically addictive over a period of time.  So many people who smoke it regularly cannot cope without it psychologically. Secondly, because most people mix it with tobacco, it is phsycally addictive - the nicotine. 






Pot can also trigger conditions such as schizophrenia and epilepsy (only if you are predisposed to them), and evidence points to it being a contributing factor to such things as depression, aggressive behaviour, and other behavioural issues.  .






Why legalise yet another addictive substance when we already have issues with alcohol and cigarettes?  Maybe decriminilising for medicinal purposes would be ok (I know it does have some positive benefits for some chronically ill and terminally ill people),  but why would you want to legalise it?






Personally I hate the stuff.  I've been there, done that, and can't stand the smell (long story about that one, but I have an ex who used to grow the stuff).  However, I couldn't give a shit if someone else smokes it.  It's none of my business, as long as they aren't doing it inside my house, or offering it to my kids (or anyone's kids, for that matter).






But in that case it's not the pot that's physically addictive, it's the nicotine.  Psychologically I can get...But not physically, because pot doesn't contain nicotine (and I think it depends on where you are as to how many people mix it-here no one does).



I just don't see the big deal...Like alcohol, it can be fun and a break from everyday life when used responsibly. But, like alcohol, it can be abused. One's legal-why not the other? And why should we legislate for those who abuse things rather than for those who are capable of being responsible? Why are we wasting tax money fighting an industry that could be regulated and capitalized on?

Jodi - posted on 09/25/2009

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Quoting Diana:



Quoting Jodi:




Quoting Diana:

I dunno, Laura...I've never heard of someone driving stoned and killing a bunch of people, although I guess it might've happened (?)








Actually, I wouldn't get in a car with someone who was stoned, and I have actually refused to in the past, just as I wouldn't get in a car with someone who has had too much to drink.  They are just as impaired to drive as someone who has been drinking.  I don't know the stats for marijuana usage, but I do know that drugs now kill more people on the roads than alcohol.










Well I didn't say to get in the car with a person who was stoned or that it was a good idea to drive while stoned...I was making the stereotypical (but hey, there are stereotypes for a reason...) point that once someone is stoned they don't *want* to drive-and that I've never heard of someone being killed by a high driver, although it's not totally implausible.





True, my apologies Diana :)  I was just making the point that people DO drive stoned, and quite regularly.  I think if you researched the stats, there would be people who have been killed by a stoned driver.  In my experience (just the people I knew that were heavily into it when we were young), they actually believe they are better drivers when they are stoned, and that is extremely scary.  They used the reasoning that they are more focused, less aggressive, more likely to notice detail, such as someone stepping out on the road, etc.  My argument used to scream in my head, but try to convince them logically that this may be true, but did it occur to them that with their reaction time (and we all know how slow they are), they may as well be drink driving, because it equated to the same result.

[deleted account]

Quoting Jodi:



Quoting Diana:

I dunno, Laura...I've never heard of someone driving stoned and killing a bunch of people, although I guess it might've happened (?)






Actually, I wouldn't get in a car with someone who was stoned, and I have actually refused to in the past, just as I wouldn't get in a car with someone who has had too much to drink.  They are just as impaired to drive as someone who has been drinking.  I don't know the stats for marijuana usage, but I do know that drugs now kill more people on the roads than alcohol.






Well I didn't say to get in the car with a person who was stoned or that it was a good idea to drive while stoned...I was making the stereotypical (but hey, there are stereotypes for a reason...) point that once someone is stoned they don't *want* to drive-and that I've never heard of someone being killed by a high driver, although it's not totally implausible.

Jodi - posted on 09/25/2009

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Quoting Laura:

I'm surprised I haven't heard yet that it's not addictive...I will say again, no more problematic than alcohol. My ex-husband got to a point where he smoked a joint as soon as he woke up...and on every break at work, then as soon as dinner was done...then as soon as I go the babies down for bed. It got to a point where I didn't know he was stoned, I could only tell he wasn't cause he was throwing things around. I'm not huge against it...I just think that a lot of pot smokers (some of my very best friends) think it's more harmless than it is.



Laura, it is addictive for two reasons (and I have seen studies about it too).  Firstly, similar to cigarette smoking, it is psychologically addictive over a period of time.  So many people who smoke it regularly cannot cope without it psychologically. Secondly, because most people mix it with tobacco, it is phsycally addictive - the nicotine. 



Pot can also trigger conditions such as schizophrenia and epilepsy (only if you are predisposed to them), and evidence points to it being a contributing factor to such things as depression, aggressive behaviour, and other behavioural issues.  .



Why legalise yet another addictive substance when we already have issues with alcohol and cigarettes?  Maybe decriminilising for medicinal purposes would be ok (I know it does have some positive benefits for some chronically ill and terminally ill people),  but why would you want to legalise it?



Personally I hate the stuff.  I've been there, done that, and can't stand the smell (long story about that one, but I have an ex who used to grow the stuff).  However, I couldn't give a shit if someone else smokes it.  It's none of my business, as long as they aren't doing it inside my house, or offering it to my kids (or anyone's kids, for that matter).

Jodi - posted on 09/25/2009

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Quoting Diana:

I dunno, Laura...I've never heard of someone driving stoned and killing a bunch of people, although I guess it might've happened (?)



Actually, I wouldn't get in a car with someone who was stoned, and I have actually refused to in the past, just as I wouldn't get in a car with someone who has had too much to drink.  They are just as impaired to drive as someone who has been drinking.  I don't know the stats for marijuana usage, but I do know that drugs now kill more people on the roads than alcohol.

Isobel - posted on 09/25/2009

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I actually, entirely agree with you...I think it is no more harmful than alcohol. Most are able to enjoy it sometimes, while an unlucky few are far more affected. I think it should be legalized so most can enjoy it and those who can't have legitimate grounds to seek help with their addiction...just like alcoholics

[deleted account]

hahaha...Well, my husband has been at several points like your ex-husband is. I'm not sure that the substance itself is addictive, since he didn't go through withdrawals without it, but the feeling is definitely addictive. I don't think it's harmless-it is hell on the lungs, for instance, but I think it's less harmful than some other things we allow people to do. And legalizing it frees up the money we spend fighting the industry as well as creates jobs and generates new tax revenue. It can also be better regulated to prevent contaminants if it's legalized.

Isobel - posted on 09/25/2009

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I'm surprised I haven't heard yet that it's not addictive...I will say again, no more problematic than alcohol. My ex-husband got to a point where he smoked a joint as soon as he woke up...and on every break at work, then as soon as dinner was done...then as soon as I go the babies down for bed. It got to a point where I didn't know he was stoned, I could only tell he wasn't cause he was throwing things around. I'm not huge against it...I just think that a lot of pot smokers (some of my very best friends) think it's more harmless than it is.

[deleted account]

Nope. Which is why I say I guess it could happen. lol I'm just going off my experience with pot smokers-most of them only venture as far as the closest munchies, usually in the kitchen and then to bed. Hungry, happy, sleepy. =D

[deleted account]

I dunno, Laura...I've never heard of someone driving stoned and killing a bunch of people, although I guess it might've happened (?)

Jeannette - posted on 09/25/2009

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Part of me is screaming legalize it already! Then, I think....maybe not, I drink, I'd probably smoke pot too! lol! (well, not smoke it, but consume it)

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