Lotus Birth

~Jennifer - posted on 07/31/2009 ( 34 moms have responded )

4,164

61

365

I ran across this article and I'm just wondering who has heard of this, or if anyone would actually try it. I'm assuming that this is after a home birth, as I've never heard of a hospital offering this option.





What is Lotus Birth?

Leaving the baby with their umbilical cord and placenta still attached, until the cord dries and falls off by itself is called a Lotus Birth. This practice is also known as nonseverance. Some cultures and species that practise nonseverance are; some tribal Aborigines, the !Kung tribe, & some species of monkey.



Why have a Lotus Birth?

Every mother has her own reasons. Here are some of the reasons that women may choose lotus birth;



- no desire or wish to sever the cord, or aversion of cutting through the cord.

- gentle and peaceful transition for the baby, allowing them to decide when to "let go" of that connection.

- respect for the baby and placenta.

- 100% gurantee that the baby gets the optimal and specific blood volume that is required for that particular baby.

- encourages the family to 'slow down' and partake in a babymoon or 'seclusion period'.

- encourages the mother to slow down in the first week or so for recovery and baby gets her full attention.

- minimises the "pass the baby around" game that visitors like to play! Most visitors will prefer to wait until the placenta is gone!

- spiritual or emotional reasons.

- tradition or cultural 'done thing'.

- no need to worry about how to clamp/cut/tie the cord!

- possible decreased risk of infection (Lotus birth ensures a closed system of cord, placenta, and baby. There is no open wound.)

- possible decreased healing time of belly button (Wounds take time to heal. If there is no wound, healing time is minimised.)





Full Article: http://www.joyousbirth.info/articles/lot...

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Charlie - posted on 08/02/2009

11,203

111

401

The story of " That dingo ate my baby "

The simple story is that three people heard the cry of Azaria on the night she disappeared from the tent in the camping ground at Ayers Rock (Uluru). Lindy saw a dingo coming out of the tent and dingo tracks were seen around and inside the tent. Blood from Azaria was found in large quantities - for an infant - on the tent mattress and other items, on the tent itself, near the carry-basket she had been sleeping in, and next to dingo tracks.

Shortly after the alarm was raised, Aboriginal and white trackers following the dingo prints (until they could no longer, as it mixed with shoe prints of humans on the road) saw drag marks in the sand; in two places were there was a shallow depression in the sand, where a bundle had been set down, apparently while the animal rested. The depressions contained the imprint of a knitted garment, and next to one, small, dark patches in the sand, which they took to be blood.

For everyone who had been with the Chamberlains that day, or held the vigil with them that night as they waited for word on their daughter, there was no question that the Chamberlains were a loving family, and that they had just experienced the loss of their daughter and sister under horrific circumstances.

But false rumours began to fly. Some members of the media and police helped spread the rumours. The first inquest found that Azaria had died by a dingo attack, and the Coroner chastised the police for shoddy work. He felt that some police may have been against the idea of a dingo being involved, and that their 'evidence' against the Chamberlains did not stand up.

Some who felt attacked by the coroner vowed to 'set things right' as they saw it. Eight months later, in the coordinated nationwide 'Operation Ochre' the Chamberlain's home was searched and large quantities of items were taken by police. At the same time, all of the eyewitnesses had police at their doors, asking for statements. From the beginning it was clear what the agenda was. When the eyewitnesses began to describe what they had seen or heard, the police told them that 'they did not want to hear anything about a dingo. This is a murder investigation.' The police told those who had been there on the night, and had seen the evidence first hand, that they expected an early confession from Lindy; they did not even expect it to go to trial.

The first inquest was overturned, and the second inquest made no finding, but bound the Chamberlains over for trial. The police would not get their wish of a confession for they failed to recognise how important innocence is to innocent people. Based on faulty 'evidence' - all of which was later overturned - Lindy was found guilty of murder and her husband of helping her conceal the crime. She received a life sentence with no parole; he received a three year suspended sentence.

The Chamberlains fought to prove their innocence, until they reached the end of all legal means available to them. But suddenly, bowing to multiple pressures, the Northern Territory released Lindy and established a Royal Commission to review all the evidence. Ultimately, the Chamberlain's convictions were quashed and they were exonerated. Four years later they received some compensation.

Still, even though the first Coroner had said he believed a dingo responsible, and the Royal Commission and NT Supreme Court echoed that, the NT government would not agree with them. Even the Crown prosecutor, in the trial, had said it was a case of 'simple alternatives'; either a dingo killed Azaria, or Lindy did. But, in 1995, confirming that none of the Chamberlains were in any way responsible for Azaria's death, the coroner at that time ruled that the cause of her death could not be determined. It seems hard to fathom, as all of the key witnesses were still alive, the testing still available, and the Royal Commission did enormous research, finally saying that it had not been proved beyond reasonable doubt that a dingo had not taken Azaria. One newspaper headline said it best - "OUTRAGE".

This conversation has been closed to further comments

34 Comments

View replies by

Angie - posted on 08/03/2009

318

43

13

Let me get this straight...its still attached to the mom...in her HOO HA?!?!?!

Not for me...kind of gross to actually think about it...I didn't have a vaginal birth so I may sound "stupid" to this. Its kind of like Scientology, when Tom Cruise had to eat Katie Holme's placenta... GROSS. That is what I heard...when she gave birth to her girl

Charlie - posted on 08/02/2009

11,203

111

401

aaah seinfeld i loved that show .
We in Australia dont even have shrimps !
We have prawns Lol !

Dana - posted on 08/02/2009

11,264

35

489

Better than being the corny American repeating lines off Crocodile dundee. :)

Charlie - posted on 08/02/2009

11,203

111

401

Yeah it has become a catch cry along with " chuck another shrimp on the barbie "
Maybe it was off crocodile dundee !

Dana - posted on 08/02/2009

11,264

35

489

Wow, quite a story. Not really something to laugh about. I think though that I heard the line "the dingo ate me baby" in a comedy movie or something.

Dana - posted on 08/02/2009

11,264

35

489

Jen, where have I heard that before? It made me laugh my a** off but I can't remember where I heard it.

[deleted account]

Who would want to nurse/cuddle their baby with that thing still attached? I think I'd rather eat it than go for the Lotus option and thats saying something. I think I'll pass on both though. No offence to anyone who would do either, I'm just too squemish.

Sara - posted on 08/02/2009

9,313

50

584

I would assume that it would start to smell after a while, as well as attract insects and wild animals. Watch out for dingos!

[deleted account]

I asked my husband to read the description on a lotus birth and I wish I could have video taped his horrific reaction! Priceless! I always knew that my husband was squeemish about doctors, needles, medical anything. I fully expected him to be up near my face during Matthew's actual delivery. To my surprise, he peeked down a few times. Then came to tell me what it looked like. (I had no interest in looking at all with a mirror) Then hubby decided to watch the birth, and cut the cord. I was proud of him for not getting sick! I, on the other hand, puked :-(

JL - posted on 08/02/2009

3,635

48

105

Never heard of this....interesting and a bit weird. It that what someone wants to do then more power to them but no thank you I would have passed on that one.

Lindsay - posted on 08/01/2009

3,532

26

266

This is the first I've ever heard of Lotus birth! Too late for me, I guess! It seems odd to me but that's mainly because I'm not familiar with it. I'm sure there are people out there that swear it is the ONLY way to go and truly form a BOND with your child but whatever! Sorry, I just couldn't resist....=)

Charlie - posted on 08/01/2009

11,203

111

401

Yeah thats what my fiance said " its like cutting a garden hose " lol.

[deleted account]

Ok so I just asked my husband about the "pulsing cord" and he said yes, it was pulsing. He saw much more than I did on that end and he said it was like a heartbeat kind of pulse. When I asked if it was slow like my heartbeat or fast like the baby's he said it was fast. So I don't know, I'm sure my heart rate was up at that moment and it could have been pulsing to my heart rate but from what he said it was fast like how it sounded on the heartbeat checks during pregnancy. He also re-stated what I said earlier, that it was like cutting through thick rubber. He said, "It's not like what you see in movies or on tv, where the father just snips through the cord. You have to cut and cut, like if you're cutting through thick rubber or about a one inch section of copy paper." LOL Daddy's words. Now I wish I had let them set up the mirror so I could have seen but while he was doing that I was looking at my baby laying on my chest and I could care less what was going on "down there".

Minnie - posted on 08/01/2009

7,076

9

786

I can absolutely see keeping the placenta and baby connected until mom pushes out the placenta (I did this), but once it is no longer attached to mom and the cord is no longer pulsating there is no exchange of nutrients/wastes. So I can't see a health reason to hold onto it longer. I can cerainly see a spiritual/culural one though, and I respect that.

Deanne - posted on 08/01/2009

313

246

40

Exactly! They like to make you think your in control... but really, they do whatever THEY want!

Charlie - posted on 08/01/2009

11,203

111

401

yeah i was told about it previous to birth and thought it was something id like to do ( 5min elevation ) but after two days induced labor totally forgot and wasn't even asked anyway !

Deanne - posted on 08/01/2009

313

246

40

Oh & I too didn't realise the cord pulsed after birth until the blood spurt everywhere when daddy cut the cord!

Deanne - posted on 08/01/2009

313

246

40

We were told of it also (in Australia) that it was an option.... but they only really mentioned the benefits of the baby receiving that extra goodness for a few minutes. I thought it was an excellent idea but of course, when it comes to the crunch & your too busy enjoying your new bubba, they just do whatever & cut the cord seconds after birth anyways!
None of my midwives ever asked me for a birth plan (not that I had one cos I know how labours can go totally opposite to what you are expecting or wanting!!) so if I'd opted for that, it wouldn't have happened anyways!

Charlie - posted on 08/01/2009

11,203

111

401

yeah i have heard of it and you can ask for it at the hospital in Australia , I have only heard good things about lotus birth .
If you do not like the idea of having it attached for so long , it even helps to keep the placenta elevated above baby , after birth for 5 mins !! so baby can get as much goodness from the placenta before cutting it .

Dana - posted on 08/01/2009

11,264

35

489

Yikes! A little too far for me. It doesn't seem like it should be very healthy or sanitary. Why is it always portrayed as something that needs to done quick..... Make sure to clamp it and get it cut? Is it just b/c of what Mary said, it actually increases the incidence of jaundice? Jaundice is a pain in the butt when mixed with a preemie who doesn't have the suck swallow down. I'd prefer to stay away from anything that increases the incidents of jaundice. I obviously have something personal against jaundice.... LOL

[deleted account]

Well ya learn something new every day! Never heard of the practice either. I can understand the natural part of a lotus birth, and like Lisa said, the mystical part. I'm wondering if this might be part of some Native American cultures. Well, it's something I definately would not care for. I also never saw the cord, and my placenta was sent away to be biopsied so I never saw that too. But with all due respect to other cultures, let them practice as they wish.

[deleted account]

LOL Mary, I didn't even know the cord pulses. Jacob came out, Steve cut the cord and then I asked the doctor to show me my placenta and (wow it's BIG) then it was disposed of. I never saw the cord when it was still attached. I'll have to ask Steve about it, if it "pulsed" lol He did tell me that it was a little hard to cut...like thick rubber.

Mary - posted on 08/01/2009

3,348

31

119

Ok, I honestly think the whole thing is a bit bizarre, but I did want to through this out there...Not unheard of to have pt's ask that the cord not be cut until after it stops pulsating. Most people aren't aware of this, but it actually increases the incidence of jaundice.

[deleted account]

I've never heard of this at all! How strange it sounds to me! And I mean no offense to anyone who may be part of any cultures that practice this, just that to me it is a strange concept. Personally, no. I would never consider doing it. Let me pop out my baby, let Daddy cut the cord and send the rest out with the medical waste. Ugh, I can't imagine the SMELL! Lisa, is that what the Rosemary is for?

Minnie - posted on 08/01/2009

7,076

9

786

"gentle and peaceful transition for the baby, allowing them to decide when to "let go" of that connection"

see this is where I think it merges with mysticism. The baby doesn't decide- the cord, attached to the placenta, or unattached, is still going to dry up and detach from the navel at the same rate.

- 100% gurantee that the baby gets the optimal and specific blood volume that is required for that particular baby.

Hmmm..correct me if I'm wrong, but once the cord stops pulsating, doesn't that prevent the flow of blood? I mean, once there is not active blood flow I would assume that the blood cells aren't very viable in the cord and placenta any longer- they would no longer be receiving oxygen and nutrients- they would be stagnating.


- spiritual or emotional reasons.
- tradition or cultural 'done thing'.

Yes, the above two are the main reasons I think

- "no need to worry about how to clamp/cut/tie the cord!"

I think that if they don't know how to do that they PROBABLY shouldn't be handling an unassisted home birth, what say you?

- possible decreased healing time of belly button (Wounds take time to heal. If there is no wound, healing time is minimised.)

There is no healing to take place cut or uncut. The cord just dries and separates from the navel whether or not the ubilical cord is still attached to the placenta. I don't understand this reasoning.

Minnie - posted on 08/01/2009

7,076

9

786

I've read up on it before- and one thing that hit me was the reason that it's 'natural' to leave the placenta attached to the infant- but really, when you want to be as natural as possible- what animal leaves the cord attached? (I have not heard that some monekeys do it, but maybe they're an exception) And that's because having the afterbirth hanging around baby is a death sentence. Not only is it cumbersome (in lotus birth the placenta has to be repeatedly treated with rosemary and kept in a cloth or basket), but it would attract animals. I'm sure we've ALL seen documentaries in Africa with gazelles giving birth and how much that attracts the jackals. All animals actually eat the placenta to clean up the remains (not suggesting we do that!)

But really, HOW is leaving afterbirth (after allowing the ubilical cord to finish pulsating so that the infant can get its blood) natural? If anything, I think it's full of mysticism- not nature.

I'm sure that in a year or so I'll have found something that totally refutes what I believe about it now, as that tends to be the trend of my life, lol.

Obviously it doesn't do HARM to the baby, I just don't see it as a 'natural' thing- but more of a spiritual thing.

Sharon - posted on 07/31/2009

11,585

12

1314

Um how long does this take? Weeks?



I think I'll pass. I haven't seen the harm of cutting through the cord - its worked for us(?) for how many hundreds of years? But you know? A few extra hours wouldn't be bad....

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms