Radio host uses the N word...

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Sharon - posted on 08/14/2010

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Tah - I get the difference - but I think its out of place.

If black people want to lose the stereotype - they need to stop segregating themselves.

Its ok for US to use this word but YOU can't use it in any form or in any context.

Its not right. I want equality and racism to end as much as anyone. But don't we have to help ourselves? Instead of living down to expectations shouldn't we try to be better than what is expected?

Shouldn't that start with getting rid of "our" words type of situations?

Sharon - posted on 08/14/2010

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The caller was an idiot. The word wasn't directed at the caller - it was used in reference.
I'm sick & tired of pussy footing around that damn word.

See? "we" can't even say it here. The "n' word, "that word" what the fuck? She said NIGGER. She didn't call that woman a nigger. She said its said on HBO and a gazillion different comedic acts and I hear it all the damn time in rap music.

I would never say it to a black friend because it is unkind and rude. But to pussy foot around it when referencing the word - is just stupid.

Maybe if people are sick of hearing it - we should march on and protest rap music for perpetuating the stereo type and the use of the word.

You cannot claim its ok for THIS group to use the word while CALLING their friends, comrades, and neighbors niggers or nigga's then scream "racism" for someone else for simply referencing the word.

Sharon - posted on 08/16/2010

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Talk about timing - I am LOVING what this beautiful man has to say about the "n" word.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/OPINION/08/16/gr...

From white or black, the n-word is not OKBy LZ Granderson, Special to CNNAugust 16, 2010 4:04 p.m. EDT

Editor's note: LZ Granderson is a senior writer and columnist for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com, and has contributed to ESPN's Sports Center, Outside the Lines and First Take. He is a 2010 nominee and the 2009 winner of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) award for online journalism, and a 2010 and 2008 honoree of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA) for column writing.

(CNN) -- I was out roaming the streets of east London with a group of friends back in 2007 when we stumbled across this sweaty hipster club tucked between an old church and a bank. It wasn't a very large space, holding maybe a couple of hundred people, but what it lacked in size was more than made up in the energy coming from the predominantly white, eclectic crowd on the dance floor.

The music was a continuous flow of everything from '80s house music to current hip hop and I had just enough beers in me to join the raucous crowd in singing the words of each song at the top of my lungs. From Inner City's "Big Fun" to House of Pain's "Jump Around," it seemed with each track, the crowd grew louder and louder.

Then Kanye West's "Gold Digger" came on. For those of you who don't remember the chorus, allow me to refresh your memory:

"Now I ain't sayin' she's a gold digger

But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas"

I've never sobered up so quickly before in my life. There I was, one of maybe a handful of black people in a crowded, dark room with hundreds of drunk white people yelling the n-word.

Now obviously I never felt I was in any real danger. And even as the crowd repeated the word over and over and over again, not once did I think anyone around me meant anything malicious by it.

Still, I became angry ... I just wasn't sure at whom.

I thought, "What is it with white people and that word?"

But then I also had to ask myself, "What is it with black people and that word?"

After all, at least on that night, Kanye was the one who brought it up.

Last week Dr. Laura Schlessinger used the word repeatedly on her radio show in a discussion with a caller. The knee jerk reaction to her rant is to demand she be fired. That was also the response to Don Imus' on-air racial slur back in 2007, and Rush Limbaugh's racially charged comment in 2003, and of course who can forget Jimmy The Greek for sort of getting the ball rolling in 1988.

I believe Schlessinger and the others deserve the repercussions their actions have drawn, but I am frustrated that as a nation we continue to interpret the censure of such people as progress while ignoring some of the uncomfortable truths nestled inside their racist diatribes. It is in dissecting these uncomfortable truths that we get to the actual social progress, not with the cosmetic firings that make us all feel better for a moment.

For example, I know there is a contingent of black people who claim our usage of the n-word is done so affectionately that's why it's OK for us to use it and not whites.

I don't believe it's OK for anyone to use the word because of its undeniable link to one of the country's most brutal and disgusting periods. It was a word used to intimidate and belittle. Any attempt to alter its meaning through some warped sense of exclusivity is not only misguided, but disrespectful to the blood of both blacks and whites that was spilled in the name of racial equality.

Yes, between friends it could hold a different connotation. But I would argue there is very little affection in Kanye using the word in a song, and that our continual injection of the word into pop culture is not only hypocritical but unintentionally gives white hipsters in London, Sydney, New York or any other city where a song like "Gold Digger" can be heard, permission to say it.

The substantive question, the one that could lead to a better understanding, isn't who is saying the n-word, but why. Now, if a white person said something like that, they could be labeled a racist. Me? Someone out there is calling me an Uncle Tom right now. And it's this sophomoric labeling that keeps us locked in a hamster wheel.

It's hard for me to believe that Schlessinger's remarks were rooted in a genuine yearning to promote honest dialogue about race --more like a belligerent attempt to shock, likely out of her own frustrations. How could a white person who has been in media as long as she has be ignorant of the ramifications of uttering the n-word on air?

But she was right about one thing: Culturally neither blacks nor whites have the courage to talk honestly across color lines. We still act as if "colorblindness" can be achieved without addressing the nuances of race in a country with a complicated history such as ours.

So, politically we coin euphemisms like "inner city" and "real Americans" as if no one knows what's really being said. We draw lines in the sand on topics such as the n-word and we're quick to assign harsh names to anyone who tries to cross that line, because bullying is much easier than listening.

I know, I know, we have a black president, that's got to mean something, right? Yes, it does. But also keep in mind the nation has also seen a dramatic increase in hate group membership and we have a new political movement with racist organizers woven into the early stages of its fabric since the election of that black president. This language isn't helping.

There is still a lot of work to be done and quite frankly the rebuke of Schlessinger does very little in addressing that work. Just as dismissing Imus, Limbaugh et al has done little. Public gaffes like these need to move beyond reactionary name-calling and firings and toward the kind of conversations that can only happen when we remove the muzzle of fear.

Jaime - posted on 08/14/2010

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"a lot of people don't understand, don't want to and never will"

Awesome, so I'm an ignorant white woman who couldn't possibly understand the hurtful nature of racism? Did it ever occur to you that I do understand and I just don't see it as the 'boo-hoo' story that she's making it out to be?

Where does your assumption come from that the people telling you that your reaction is over-sensitive, is because they don't have to "deal with it"? Why, because they tell you that you're being over-sensitive? Did it ever occur to you that you are being over-sensitive? I think this brings us back to the double standard of the use of the word 'nigger' or 'nigga' or however the hell you want to spell it. You can say it and have it be just another black 'hey how are you'...but I can't say it and have it be received in the same manner regardless of whether or not that was my intention. We don't have our heads buried in the sand...we're friggin' trying to eliminate the sand just as you are...but it's rather difficult when I unload a bucket only to have someone like you pour it over my head and then tell me I've gone and buried myself!

[deleted account]

I looked Nas up before I posted that comment, as I had "heard of him" just did not know about his background. During that search, I found the title and the lyrics to several of the songs on the album. I had to read them to fully understand them. All he talks about is "taking revenge", shooting cops, having "b****es, and guns, guns, guns. He talks about teaching kids to be thugs, following in his violent footsteps. I'm sorry, all that I was able to take from it is that he wants to pit black people against white people and start a street war.



He is igniting hate between the races. Black people hearing the lyrics are enticed to a glorified life of crime while white people hearing the same lyrics are bombarded with reasons to fear the black population. If he and the black population are so annoyed that "cops watch them more" and people are afraid and suspicious of them "just because they are black" then maybe they should stop singing about killing cops and blowing people away. People are not suspicious of black people "because they are black" they are suspicious because they hear music like this encouraging black people to be violent criminals.





I agree that the original issue is that the husband did not stand up to his family for her, and that he should have, but by the time the story made it to this article, that had long since ceased to be the point. If you truly wanted to discuss the host's lack of sympathy, you would have titled it "Radio host tells woman to get over racism" not "Radio host uses the N word" which blatantly implies that the debate is more about the word she used than her lack of sympathy for the caller's situation.

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Tah - posted on 08/17/2010

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well thank you..thats how i chose him...a pic on the internet..lmbo..he was standing there...right after boxing practice..arms folded..looking like fresh meat..and i was just off a diet of one man for 6.5 years...lol...now there goes my baby...lol

Charlie - posted on 08/17/2010

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oh you wernt Joking Tah LMAO .

I was thinking " she must be joking because that IS Kanye "

haha nice one Tah your mans a hottie :D

[deleted account]

I can't see the next page so I have to comment to get there. HI EVERYONE....these changes are driving me nuts!

Hannah - posted on 08/17/2010

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I think that the radio host was being insensitive to what it is like to be black. I admit that I will never know what it is like to experience racism and I will never pretend to know. Just like others have said, further segragating yourself in using the "N" word only hampers the progress we have made. I believe that with each generation color will fade and hopefully we will see no color at all.

[deleted account]

I dated a boy back in school a boy who was absolutely the most kindest person i ever met and at break we met up as we did everyday.One of the days a friend of his meet with our group of friends and the greeted each other saying whats up and the N word..i nearly choked.i was like why greet each other that way and i was told by another friend its okay for black people to say it but not us(white people) and i was 16 at the time and i said if you ask me i dont see any use for the word by anybody and the never greeted each other like that again while in front of a group of mixed people.I always thought maybe i was wrong for saying that,but i still feel the same there is no use for it and its good to hear some black people who also feel the same about that word.:-)



Just to add my 2cents from a distance your husband looks like p diddy but close up looks like a double of Kayne.You lucky lady lol.

Tah - posted on 08/17/2010

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well thank you..i try..lol..we went to a grown and sexy sweethearts party last weekend...lol

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WOW! He's good looking....and here I was sitting thinking, "why in the hell does she have a picture of PDiddy as her profile pic?" .....lmao. He's very handsome, Tah.

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They do that here on the radio and the music TV stations, Loureen. It doesn't meet with standards for daytime viewing/listening. It's basically considered a swear word. I had no idea that the lyric was changed in the Glee version.

I don't believe it's OK for anyone to use the word because of its undeniable link to one of the country's most brutal and disgusting periods. It was a word used to intimidate and belittle. Any attempt to alter its meaning through some warped sense of exclusivity is not only misguided, but disrespectful to the blood of both blacks and whites that was spilled in the name of racial equality.
That statement from the article Sharon posted is everything I feel on this subject.

Charlie - posted on 08/16/2010

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They dont play that version here instead of the "n" word he just repeats broke , broke !

Sharon - posted on 08/16/2010

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I was just thinking of something...

My kids - have no real clue what racism is, they've experienced it but I've cushioned it and deflected it as often as I could.

But the kanye song... when that song came out, it was so popular, I remember we were singing along in the car and my two oldest paused in the song when he sings "niggas" and looked at me for the "ok" to say a bad word. I shook my head. Its just better to never say it - then we had to talk about it.

I didn't think much of it at the time but its a wedge. I see that so much more clearly now. And that makes me angry. There shouldn't be any such wedge. We're all just PEOPLE, yes people with history, ugly & dark and forgetting it won't fix it, but neither will self imposed segregation.

Charlie - posted on 08/16/2010

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I think the point of frustration comes from the fact white people will never what it is to black and black people will never know what it is to be white race wise .

Jaime - posted on 08/16/2010

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Thanks for sharing that article Sharon. The author makes some very clear points about the setbacks we face as a whole society when we perpetuate the use of the 'n' word and furthermore try to justify the do's and don'ts.

Sharon - posted on 08/16/2010

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He's also right that its hard to for blacks & whites to openly discuss some of these issues - for oh so many reasons. Its sad and I just look forward to the day (whether I'm alive or not) that racism is just a point in history.

Tah - posted on 08/16/2010

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he makes good points...about the use of the word on both sides..being afraid to address race..thinking that ignoring these things will make it go away...see how open-minded i am..i get it..lol...

Jaime - posted on 08/16/2010

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Found this quote online today...thought I'd share it:



"It demands great spiritual resilience not to hate the hater whose foot is on your neck, and an even greater miracle of perception and charity not to teach your child to hate." James Arthur Baldwin



Eleanor Roosevelt said "no one can make you feel inferior without your consent"...this is a quote that I live by because I have to agree that we are all personally responsible for how we perceive the world. Certainly when we are young and vulnerable there are many influences that can steer us in different directions than what was thought to be intended for us...but at the core of it, we are all responsible for #1. We have responsibilities to our children, to guide them and teach them and love them into adulthood and beyond....but it is ultimately up to them how they choose to accept the world.



For the record choosing not to give something power, is not the same as ignoring it in the hopes that it will go away. I am not ignorant to the fact that racism is very prevalent in our 2010 society. Not just racism, but prejudice against anyone that doesn't fit the societal ideal of being a worthy member of the human race. Racism, ageism, homophobia, and on and on and on. So how do we end it? Well it's certainly not by perpetuating the nasty sentiments that serve as fuel to the hatred fire.

Tah - posted on 08/16/2010

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@Dana..i am considering other peoples sides...they dont agree with me and i dont agree with them...now..i find it funny that other people on here that agree with me..their post dont get responded to, though they say basically the same thing that i do..but wheni say it..i get jumped on..this is a debate..and again....when we have these debates...i usually have other debates or just people who agree with me going on through PM...so i may not be talking about something said on here at all...i haven't gotten upset or disrepected anyone on here for there view...if was closed- minded i wouldnt have started it...if everyone thought the same way or agreed on everything this would be a boring world and a boring forum. I understand why some people may feel the way they do...and it's their right to say so and i have the same right to do so correct?...i mean if im mistaken...let me know...

Tah - posted on 08/16/2010

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@Kati..firstly i wasnt even thinking about u when i wrote it so you can calm down....dont have a fit..also..you don't know about any private conversations i have had during many of the race discussions i have had on here..and also..im not saying just because ur white...some black people havent experienced it and i said it about them also..also who have i tried to get back because they got me...half the time i kill them with kindness or ignore them so dont presume to know me or what i do or how i react or how i feel because i was trying to shed some light on the use of one word in the black community which again i have neither condemned or agreed with...



walmart was the first thing that popped into my head because my nephews just left to go to walmart for me....not because of the other post..so we know what happens when we assume..



and last but not least for you..when i said everyone..i was including myself or i would have said alot of people..or all of you..or KATI...needs it...geez....

Rosie - posted on 08/16/2010

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nobody here is saying they have a clue as to what a black person has been through if they aren't black, and i don't think anybody here has suggested it. you all are sure saying that if people are white they can just accept racism back. it's ok. it's been done to you all your life so what the hell...i don't live my life by the code of you get me, i'll get you. i feel sorry for you that apparantly you think that's ok.

i'd like to know where i'm being insensitive to suggest that ANY form of racism is wrong. it's because i'm white, plain and simple. that makes it alright?!!seriously. and i'm the one that needs sensitivity training?

we will go back and forth all day about this, you're right about that. i don't have any clue where you or anybody else is getting the idea that people are being insensitive toward the struggles that black people have had to face over the years. or that you somehow seem to miss the fact that because someone thinks that any form of racism at all is wrong, yet you still seem to think that we would all jump on the bandwagon and chime in to someone calling another person a nigger in walmart. WTF?

[deleted account]

You seem awfully defensive Tah....I'm not sure why you started this debate if you're not willing to listen and consider the other side. Did you think everyone was going to agree or that you would somehow change EVERYONE'S minds by the end of it? We're here to debate not agree!

Tah - posted on 08/16/2010

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its funny because people will say "im not insensitve to it" and then in the next sentence say something insensitive.,,or tell someone that has experienced it time and time again that they are being to oversensitive to it..well you tell me how i should react since you know what it's like ..or keep speaking about racism as if it's something that happened in the past and is not still going on. or act like they have a clue when they dont.,,or that they dont think they are better than me..great..cause i don't think you are either..and i realize that no matter what i say they wont get it...thats about the time i tell them hey..we can agree to disagree..no sweat off my back....racism doesnt consume my life..i dont walk into walmart and wait for someone to call me a nigger..but racism..happens...sometimes i laugh about it..sometimes i get annoyed..i can sympathize with things i havent gone through..but i cant truly get the full measure of it unless it happens to me.....i think that culture sensitivy training is a great idea for everyone...

ME - posted on 08/16/2010

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You were right Tah...I have a headache...no use in banging my head any further...

Rosie - posted on 08/16/2010

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um yeah. they are denying a group of people the right to use a word simply based on the color of their skin. same thing. people are people, we don't get to decide what race gets to use what words. it completely goes against everything that black people have been fighting for. to turn around and do it to another race because they've been discriminated against doesn't make it ok, not even close. next time you tell a black person that they can't say something because they're black and tell me how well that goes over for you.

Charlie - posted on 08/16/2010

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I just think its pretty simple it upsets people dont say it .

Just because my friends and i joke around and call each other dickheads dosent mean its ok for me to go and call other people dickheads , and that is not nearly as bad as saying nigger considering all the history it has behind it .

Ignoring past mistakes attached to the word doesnt make it go away it leaves room to make the same mistakes again , i dont buy the " dont give it power " either .

Tah - posted on 08/16/2010

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@Mary Elizabeth...dont bang your head..you'll just get a headache..lol....but i am glad that you did the culture sensitivity training. Sometimes i dont even get upset because i know that some people dont even realize how insentive they are to it....and that eliminating that word in the black community is still going to leave lots of racism to overcome..most of the times i experienced racism..i wasn't called any names.....people think if you ignore it...it will somehow melt away..or "not giving it power"...i give up....lol

ME - posted on 08/16/2010

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"it's the simple fact that black people have fought soooo hard to be treated as equals in this society. and then to go and turn around and do the same thing to white people as white people did to them"

The SAME thing??? Really???

[deleted account]

Hate the word. Won't say it in any context.

In all honesty, I find it vulgar and crude when I hear it used in rap songs or by black comedians. It's like a programmed response to be disgusted at it's use. Doesn't make any difference to me whether it's pronouced with an "er" or an "a" at the end. It sounds backwards.

Rosie - posted on 08/16/2010

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for me krista, it's not the fact that i just want to say this word sooooo bad, that i feel like i'll perish. it's the simple fact that black people have fought soooo hard to be treated as equals in this society. and then to go and turn around and do the same thing to white people as white people did to them, it's assinine and completely full of intolerance. they're doing exactly what they fought against.
to me it makes their struggles seem like they are less important in our society if they are just gonna do what they don't want other people doing. you know, the whole do unto your neighbor as you would want done to you thing.

Krista - posted on 08/16/2010

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Frankly, I don't understand the complaint by white people that they can't say "nigger/nigga" but black people can.

So what? It's one freaking word. Is your vocabulary so starved for variety that you will simply perish righthisverysecond if you have to go the rest of your life without saying that one word?

It's not a word that I say, either hatefully (because I'm not hateful) or ironically (because I'd wind up looking like that douche in the "Pretty Fly for a White Guy" video), and I don't feel particularly oppressed or upset that I can't go around saying this word.

Now obviously I'm not going to perform all sorts of verbal gymnastics if I'm QUOTING someone, or singing along to a song that happens to have that word in it. But otherwise, going the rest of my life without saying it is not a particularly onerous task.

Jaime - posted on 08/16/2010

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I just don't understand the claim that 'nigger' is offensive when only white people or people that are not black use it. It's either offensive or it isn't...it's that simple really. If the black community is hanging onto this word because they want to claim it as their own, then it's also fair to say that it's a part of their culture and should NOT be offensive...yet somehow it is. It's backward thinking and it makes no sense. I don't think the radio host was intentionally trying to be insensitive. The caller asked if she thought the word was offensive and she pointed out that black guys say it all the time...perhaps she didn't answer with a straight 'yes' or 'no' to appease the caller, but she did bring up a point about the fact that the word is still widely used in situations of racism and otherwise. So it's the context that's offensive, not the word.

ME - posted on 08/16/2010

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I think that use of this word is offensive. I think it is immeasurably moreso when used by white people. I had to take a cultural sensitivity class when I was training to be a crisis counselor with a women's shelter and counseling agency...they didn't even let the white people talk for the most part (listening was seen as the most important thing that the white community can do to improve race relations in our country)...failing the training meant you couldn't work for the agency. At first this made me feel a little bad (kind of outraged actually; I mean, I'm not racist, wtf!), but by the end of the training it was crystal clear why they ran the training the way they did. White people can be incredibly insensitive and totally unaware of the issues that people of color face in this country on a daily basis. This radio show host (as well as parts of this conversation) prove that completely...

Rosie - posted on 08/15/2010

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i also thought that this post was about the use of the word as well. but if we are talking about the insensitivity of this womans feelings about her husbands family calling her a nigger, then yes i do agree that she was being insensitive. but not necessarily because she used the word nigger, but because she obviously didn't give a shit about this womans feelings. who wouldn't be upset about being called that? so other than pointing out that black people perpetuate the use of the word, she could've addressed the original question asked.

Tah - posted on 08/15/2010

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@Kelly..i titled it what it said when it popped up..next time i will give it another title so that you will know....

Tah - posted on 08/15/2010

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well if you must know...it comes from the fact that a couple of months back we had a reather heated debate about race and black people getting over it...and some of the things that were said and implied about the topic said it all..messages i received in my inbox from some women who even admitted it...and your comments..and you are entitlted to your own views...and i am entitled to mine, and those views are formed from upbringings and experience, so we can agree to disagree..also..i dont care what situation im in with my in-laws..race or how to make a pound cake...if he sees that i am uncomfortable he needs to step in and try and diffuse the situation.....your point of view is that the word wasn't offensive..okay great for you..the caller didnt feel that way....and she is the one going through it..she is the one that is there, shes knows the full story.some people may just want advice, not a wound dressing...i'll be the kettle it you makes you feel better...and you continue with every post to prove my point...there many thngs about other cultures, lifestyles that i know i dont get...open marriages...breastfeeding until 8 years old..whatever...and i admit it....I dont get it..im not going to pretend i do...so as i told the person from before..if she wanted to say it thats fine with me..i dont agree with anyone treating anyone that way..if a white caller called and said hey my wifes family is of color and is racist towards me calling me a cracker and saying out of the way things to me...and the host said we''ll you shouldn't have married a person of color stop being som sensitive..i would have a problem with that also



on every forum of race..i dont know if you r new or not..i dont always read evey post...someone says that the person or people are being over-sensitive..like the walmart post...all blacks leave the store..a woman was offended and didnt know if she wanted to shop there anymore....some peoples response...to sensitive..get over it...it was just a joke....the teacher who without warning allowed her students to dress in klan sheets and go to school scaring black and white students to death...o..to sensitive...get over it..geez...could she at least have sent a note out warning them..i mean they lived in a town where whites were the majority and racism happened..i would have pissed my pants...same comment.so there will always be someone who says that the reaction to the n word..or any of these things is the person being oversenstive and they should just get over...i would like to know in what situation...in your great opinion....is it okay to be a little sensitive?...since you do get it...o...and i didnt say that not all white women or men get it..because some do...now..i did have a white woman send me a message that said that...but..i never did...i read peoples post...responses....underlying tones..sarcasm..etc...and then i say...o..she doesn't understand..and my head hurts from the banging..so on to the next...

Jaime - posted on 08/14/2010

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Going back to this woman's grievance with her family...I agree that the husband shouldn't have allowed his family to be such douchebags, but what was the nature of the comments being said to this woman? And do we really know that the husband needed to step in and defend his wife? THAT is my point. I am not of the belief "ignore it and it will go away" because that's not realistic. I am however, of the belief that if you give something too much power over you, it will consume you and turn you into what you were fighting against in the beginning...we see this pattern all to often with lobbyist groups for abortion, the environment, anti-government organizations...it pretty much always elicits some kind of violence and it just perpetuates more violence. So when I say that a woman's boo-hooing to a radio host that didn't readily jump to dress her wounds wasn't a huge deal, it's not because I don't sympathize with hurt feelings or a sense of displacement, it's because I agreed more with the point the host was trying to make about the word not being offensive. The woman asked her if she thought the word was offensive and the host replied "black guys say it all the time" and then she repeated it herself. I fail to see how the host was so morbidly insensitive to this woman's complaint? If she didn't want an honest answer, then why bother calling in the first place. She's off licking her wounds and the host has made a public apology and we are no further on this issue because we're back to "you guys just don't get it"



Well forgive me but, did you want to be the pot or the kettle this time?

Tah - posted on 08/14/2010

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if u read my earlier post..i said that my problem with her is that she was discounting the callers feelings and the situation....if she is offended that her in-laws are being racist toward her then she has every right to be..and she didnt need the host telling her that she was being sensitive and that in that case she shouldnt have married her husband...but one thing i have learned through racial debates on here is that alot of people dont understand, dont want to and never will....i have been told i was being oversensitive to people showing racism openly to me..of course its been by those who dont have to deal with it...so they can bury their head in the sand....who is the host to tell the women who she should marry and in essence to get over it...so my problem was with her entire response..but im sure to someone who has not had to walk in that callers shoes, you would think she was just looking for sympathy...apparently im not crazy because im not the only person that thinks the host whole response was uncalled for...the woman may have been dealing with more than just being called a nigger by the in-laws whichi am so sure they didnt say with butterfly kisses,



Talking about race on here is sometimes like banging my head against a wall...again...and quite lonely since i am the minority .if you check my earlier post...you will see that i have not said that if using nigga is right or wrong..i have only been explaining to those who dont understand the thoughts of the black community on it(and not the whole black community.) i know i have some sticklers on here for being dotting every I and crossing ever T...



also..i doubt if the host was black, if the caller would have gotten that response...

Jaime - posted on 08/14/2010

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I'm aware of what 'conscious rapper' means Tah, but you can't deny that even the rappers themselves don't want to identify as conscious rappers. Mos Def, Talib Kweli...two of the most noted rappers in the last two decades or more and they BOTH discount the idealism behind the 'conscious rapper' label.



I listened to the first Nas song you posted and he used the word nigger to make his point...but so did the radio host on her radio show. She was making a point the same as Nas is. So let me ask you, would it be a different story if the radio host was black or if it was Nas that spoke to the emotionally-charged caller?

Tah - posted on 08/14/2010

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@Jaime..all my life..you didnt know..all black people know each other....and..i was referring to what she said, she said she doesn't know him..meaning she doesnt know his songs etc..as least that is i took it to mean..anywho...on to the next



@Kelly...did you listen to the song...it basically says that they called us niggers but we are much more...but i posted the link..with the words...



And this is what i meant by conscious rapper,someone who talks about these issues and puts them out there and gives you insight that can't come from google...

Jaime - posted on 08/14/2010

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Here's something interesting:



I googled 'conscious rapper' and to my surprise some of the more noted conscious rappers are actually fighting against the term as they relate it to a superior label of their industry...and all they really want is to be able to 'chill' as one whole unit of hip-hop artists...or niggas' as they put it.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscious_h...

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