Required after school tutoring for school age children

Cassie - posted on 02/01/2011 ( 16 moms have responded )

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Here is a real life situation at my school that I thought could potentially be up for debate.

At our elementary school, just last week, we implemented required after school tutoring on Tuesdays and Thursdays for all children who did not pass the practice OAA (Ohio Achievement Assessment) in November. All children who did not pass must stay after school with their classroom teachers on Tuesdays and Thursdays until 5:30 pm. School releases at 3:30. If parents refuse to have their child stay after school, that child must miss all lunch recesses to receive the tutoring during lunch recess.

How would you feel if your child were one of the students who was required to have tutoring? Do you think this is a good plan that the school has implemented or is it unfair to children and parents?

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Laura - posted on 02/01/2011

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1. Some kids just plain don't test well, it doesn't mean they don't know the material.

2. Taking away lunch recess is just going to make life harder for both the student and teacher in the afternoon. Next that kid is going to be told they have ADHD because they can't sit in class because they didn't get the chance to run off their energy.

STUPID!!!

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I agree that taking recess and lunch time away is to much. HOWEVER, I do agree that even though basing it off of test scores sounds harsh as some kids just don't test well doesn't mean that they can't "tutor" their way out of their tutoring sessions. If the tutor see's that the child CAN do the work they should be able to turn around and say alright since you CAN do the work lets work on your test taking skills instead of the material. I think that for parents to object because of meal times, extracurricular activities, and such is kind of ridiculous as those things can be dropped, put on hold, or just changed so that your child can get the help he/she needs in school. Schooling and doing well in school is the basis for all future education. The better the child does, the more help they get, the longer and better the chances are that they will stay in school AND graduate. I have 3 kids who actually do very poor test taking but do excel in their schoolwork and knowledge. We are always working on their schooling but I do have plans to get them in at Sylvan as soon as we can afford it for one of their better study and test taking classes for each child. I am also reading on it so that I can start helping them even now at home with their test taking.

Cassie - posted on 02/01/2011

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My issue is that many of these students being required to stay after school for tutoring are doing well in school and really not needing extra help. But because there is so much pressure on teachers and administrators for students to pass a standardized test, the children are being "punished."

Bonnie - posted on 02/01/2011

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I'm fine with it either way, I just don't like the idea that if the child cannot stay after school than they have to miss recesses. Recesses are their breaks. Breaks help them throughout the school day. To me that is a lot of learning within a day even if it is only twice a week.

Sherri - posted on 02/01/2011

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I would be fine obviously they need some extra help and the school is offering it. I would most definitely take advantage of the extra help. The students aren't the only ones having to stay late those poor teachers are also having to stay an additional 4hrs a week as well, for no extra pay.

Tara - posted on 02/01/2011

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I think it's bullshit and unnecessary to their overall academic development. Kids need to be kids, force fed learning does nothing to instill a love of learning and a love of knowledge, just the opposite, force fed learning for the most part turns kids minds off of wanting to learn.
There is too much pressure at school already and this will only lead to more stress and more pressure.

[deleted account]

I think thats Bullshit. I think they expect way to much from children. I believe in a good education but it they are already at school for majority of the day an then have homework to do. when do they get down time kid time or family time?

[deleted account]

What if they have extra-curricular activities? Not that those are MORE important than education, but they are an important part of life. Or special family time after school.



I would strongly object to this.... and it's only partly due to the fact that we are normally eating dinner by 5..... I would be royally ticked if my kid were to miss all lunch recesses.



Our school gets out at 2 and that is early enough that they can still have at least a little bit of a life outside of school. Do they get to do their normal homework during this tutoring time as well? Or do they have to figure out where to fit that between dinner, bath, family time, etc......

[deleted account]

I'm torn...
Like many of you, I hate the idea of teaching to the test, however, there must be some way to measure the child's academic ability in comparison to others across the state and determine who needs additional help.
I understand why the feel they need the program--unfortunately, the fact remains that many parents in poorly performing schools will NOT work on material at home with their kids, no matter how easy you make it for them. In that situation, the kids are not missing out on family time or play by staying late, most are just missing out on video game time and actually getting help with homework that might otherwise go undone.

But, in objection....
The removal of recess and lunch is ludicrous. Those are needs and forcing a child to forgo lunch or recess to study will only hinder his ability to concentrate and retain the information.
I also feel 2 hours may be too long, but I don't know how the time is being used. If they have a short break, do homework 20 minutes, have a snack, then focus on study, homework, and/or play-centered learning for the last hour, 2 hours could be perfect.
Also, it is only offered 2 days a week, which may not work with everyone's schedule. It would be better to offer the program 5 days a week and require the children attend ONE day of their choice.

Cassie - posted on 02/01/2011

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I just wanted to add that our school is doing the required tutoring because we are on academic probation. If we "fail" the OAA again as a school, we risk possibly being forced to re-staff the school. That is why there is the sudden push for passing.



Not that it makes it ok in my eyes but that is our school's reasoning...



Edited to add: Only about 5 students in our third grade are not being forced to stay after school for tutoring..

Laura - posted on 02/01/2011

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Plus there is the fact of the stigma of "needing tutoring" The other kids are going to know why little Johny is not taking the bus home or missing recess and that could create a whole other slew of problems. Including getting label "stupid" or "slow" lets face it kids are mean.

Becky - posted on 02/01/2011

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I don't like the idea of basing it on their performance on a practice test. For one, some children just don't test well, or don't do well on those standardized tests. It doesn't necessarily mean they are not grasping the material. For 2, it makes it look like the school is just trying to get high test scores to gain recognition or something. I might be okay with requiring tutoring for children who were obviously not grasping the concepts they were being taught and were falling ahead overall in school, but I'd rather see it being done during school hours than after school or during recess.

Lady Heather - posted on 02/01/2011

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Wtf? If you have a concern about my kid's progress definitely let me know. No way would they be spending an extra two hours in class each day. That is a loooong time. And we need breaks! I take breaks. Kids need to run and play! We certainly won't be helping the obesity crisis if we take away recess.

Some kids just don't test well. My best friend in high school was brilliant. We'd study together and he knew way more than I did. Then I would get an A and he would get a C. I bet he failed an assessment test in his day. Now he has a MSc and works in software development. He's super clever. Forcing him to stay in school until 5:30 would have taken away the opportunity to participate in extracurriculars like music in which he excelled. I don't see how that would be beneficial.

Do bad on one test and you have to quit soccer/hockey/baseball/dance/gymnastics/art classes/piano lessons or any of the other variety of things kids might do between 3:30 and 5:30? That's when all my activities were scheduled. Lame-o. Life is learning too.

Joanna - posted on 02/01/2011

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Taking away family time or taking away much-needed break time? Ridiculous. Why not provide families with material they can work on with their children?

Cassie - posted on 02/01/2011

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Personally, I hate it. I don't agree with teaching to the test so I don't think that children should be required to be tutored if they didn't pass a practice test in November. It also infuriates me that students whose parents refuse to allow them to stay after school have their lunch recess removed. Children need their recess to use up excess energy and promote physical activity along with cooperative play. Taking that away for the remainder of the school year to receive tutoring is unfair to the child.

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