The upside to not saving for your child's college education

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/23/2012 ( 85 moms have responded )

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If you’re doing everything you can to save for your children’s college education, chances are it’s because you think that will give your kids the best start in life.

Here’s a radical thought: Maybe the best thing you can do for your kids is ask them to pay at least some of their own way.

New research from the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University finds that kids whose parents are footing the entire college bill, including tuition, books, housing and recreation money, were most likely to be partying and possibly floundering.

“Parents who pay for everything -- including their children’s recreation and fun money -- they have children who are more heavily into drinking, drug use, marijuana use,” said Laura Padilla-Walker, associate professor of at BYU’s School of Family Life.

Padilla-Walker’s research also found that the kids whose parents were paying for everything had less of a sense of what they wanted to do in the future than those who were getting little or no help from Mom and Dad. Not surprisingly, they also were less likely to be working while going to school.

The findings, which were based on an analysis of about 400 college kids across the country, suggest that it may be good for kids to at least pay for some of their own expenses while they are in college. Without the structure of a job or the responsibility of having to pay some of their own way, some kids may simply be getting distracted.

At the very least, parents may be able to stop fretting so much about saving for college.

“It doesn’t look like you have to pay all your student’s college expenses in order for them to be successful,” Padilla-Walker said.

You may want to help out somewhat, however. In her study, the kids that seemed the most focused on school and the future were actually the ones that were getting no help at all.

Still, she cautioned that that route also has its pitfalls. Some kids who are footing the bill on their own might take longer to graduate or have to drop out because they can’t afford to keep going to school. They also may not take the time to really figure out what they are best suited for in terms of a career.

A sharper focus on the long-term goal of college, rather than the partying aspect, is clearly beneficial. Padilla-Walker noted that many kids are taking longer than the usual four years to graduate from school, and some aren’t really getting a start in life until they are 28 or 30.

“I think most parents would prefer it to be closer to the 25 range,” she said.


http://lifeinc.today.msnbc.msn.com/_news...

Well, I for one will not be paying for my children to go to College/University. I am a strong believer and always have been, that in order for them to take it seriously they must pay for most, if not all. Will I be willing to help them in desperate time of need? Of course. Will I be paying for anything in full? Absolutely not.

I think a child paying for themselves creates a strong work ethic, what being an adult is about, especially in respect to money and working for what you want in life and keeps them from doing whatever they want (when it is all paid for).

How about you? Will or are you saving to pay for your child(ren) post-secondary education? Or will they be expected to work and get loans?

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Janice - posted on 04/23/2012

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Meme how expensive is college where you live?

The average 4 year university is about 10k a semester and that's with out room and board.

I can't imagine not at least trying to help out if I could.

Lady Heather - posted on 04/24/2012

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How to becone a university professor in archaeology:

1. 4 years bachelor

2. 2-4 years masters (depending on success of research)

3. 3-5 years phd (same issues)

4. 1-2 years post doc for a pittance

5. 5-10 years sessional instructing also for a pittance while spending every night praying to a pantheon of gods that you get hired permanently next semester

6. Finally get hired. By this time you are old and cynical and hate everything.



So yeah. One day you might make some money. If someone is hiring. If you are female (like my kids) and you want a family? Good luck with that. That's the sad fucking reality of it. You really have to love what you do.

Jodi - posted on 04/24/2012

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I think, sometimes, we also have to think outside the box as to where our degrees will fit in. Often, a degree that is considered a "career choice" can be incredibly flexible and adaptable. I think we all have to adopt the view that ANY career choice is likely going to need updating, reskilling, and so on at two or three times during our lifetimes. No job is safe from societal changes really. Those days are well and truly gone.

Johnny - posted on 04/24/2012

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I went to university for what, at the time, was supposed to be one of the most in demand careers in my province. I decided to become a social worker in grade 10, did loads of paid and volunteer work to pad my resume, took the required undergrad degree, and got in. 8 years later, loads of government budget cuts, the success of "essential service" legislation meant that the pay was barely enough to make my rent and pay my loans. In addition to my chosen profession, I worked nights in a video store and did at-home admin work for a friend's business. I didn't just give up luxuries. I ate out of my parent's fridge because I couldn't afford food. My only "luxury" was my 20 year old car that I was required to have for my job. If it hadn't been for the loans, I probably could have scraped by until I had enough experience to return for my master's and got a better paying hospital job. But I ended up with exhaustion, got sick with kidney failure, and gave up. Now I don't use my degree, but I make about twice as much in working in business.



I don't want my kids to have to give up their dreams because of their debt burden. Like I said before, I will never afford to own a home. And I will probably never be able to afford to work in my chosen profession. If you had asked the experts on the job market at the time I was career planning, they would have told you I was making a great choice and that the loans would be worth it. They would have been wrong.



I will say though, I know plenty of people who went to community college and are working in retail. Actually, almost every acquaintance I have who still works in retail went to community college. Life is pretty unpredictable. I don't want my kids saddled with huge debt when they are trying to start their lives. If they already know how to work hard and stay dedicated, it doesn't teach them anything they don't already know. It just puts them a step behind the kids who aren't struggling with that burden.

Jodi - posted on 04/24/2012

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They get what is commonly called a job.

A lot of kids save up before then and do backpacking, or they get jobs while they are travelling.

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Sherri - posted on 04/25/2012

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I do not think it is my job to pay for my kids college. I can not afford too and therefore they will be footing the bill. I will be able to help them with their books but that is it. They are all expected to attend college as well but they will have to pay for it on their own.

Stifler's - posted on 04/25/2012

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Trades are just as good aswell or working your way up in business. If my kids want to do that I have no problem with that.

Stifler's - posted on 04/25/2012

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Uni isn't for everyone. My husband never went to uni or TAFE and makes more than my dad and I ever made havign been to TAFE and Uni.

Aleks - posted on 04/25/2012

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I will be waiting to see what it is that my children will wish to do before I start planning their future.

Both my kids may not even want to go into university, they may prefer some kind of trade, or pursue other interests.

Also, given that we DO live in Australia.... like Jodi has already explained, government provides the student loan covering the cost of tuition. To be honest, both myself and their dad have gone through university using HECS (the government studen loan), therefore, I would think that should our children chose to go to university they can do it in the same manner. This then means that they are the ones responsible for paying it off and, hence, managing their studies to be finished off quicker rather than slower. Though we will probably be quite happy to provide roofs over their heads during their time of further study.

I would also like to point out that some of the more in the demand university courses can be very very costly, some costing in total of above $50 - 60,000 (for example medicine, law, dentistry, economics and commerce - especially the double degrees containing a law combination, that are extremely popular and almost essential now - are some of the most expensive degrees at the moment)

I also live in a state that offers 9 different universities and countless TAFEs (kind of like technical collages that offer training/studies but not of university degree calibre ). So there is plenty for my kids to choose from should they pursue that path, without having to necessarily leave to live and study elsewhere (I would say that just about every course they may wish to study will most likely be offered here).

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It is impossible to know what fields will be in high demand in the future, but a lot of degrees can be very open and qualify people for a lot of different positions. I know in the US, almost any BS or BA will qualify one for a position in middle management, which isn't the most fascinating place to be, but it will pay the bills and allow one to work up the latter, or bide time until they can get into their chosen profession without forcing the person into horrendous amounts of debt.

That is one of the reasons I would rather J go for an engineering degree, then go on for his Masters in Architecture, rather than a straight through Architecture program. There are hundreds of different kinds of engineers, and we will always be innovating and creating new things, so there will always be a demand. I'm sure we will always be creating new buildings and houses as well, but competition among architects is fierce, whereas engineers tend to team up. That way, even though it takes a couple extra years, he would have a lot more options than just architecture. Most engineering degrees can be "tweaked" into specific fields with just a few additional classes--my husband's degree was in Electronics Engineering, but he is now a Data Systems Engineer, and all he had to do to switch was take a few certification classes and now he is qualified to do both.

I also second Meme's ideas on trade school. My husband started out at a community college and earned his associates, from there he landed a job with a company that paid for his BS and PE (Professional Engineering Licence). Now he is a partner in his firm and his loan amount was very minimal.

Janice - posted on 04/25/2012

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Yeah, I grew up poor too. I was paying for my own car insurance, pager/beeper and and any spending money with my part time job while I was in high school. After HS I got a full time job and while living at home I paid for rent (only 100$), car payment and insurance, medication (asthma), for my own food and entertainment Savings, what's that? Lol!



I really hope that my hubby and I can get ahead of the game so our kids will have it better. And we would be in a much better spot if it weren't for my school loans.



Someone mentioned that in Australia university education isn't pushed like it is in the US. Here there are tons of commercials about how parents need to save for their children's education. Its made to seem like you must go. I think that there needs to be limits on programs. I know they have them for the local community college. I graduated with over 3k other students and about 500 were education majors. Even if only 1/2 stay in the area the market is overflowing. The worst part is that the college is still advertising teaching as as promising in order to keep enrollment. I feel like people or being duped.



I personally knew that the market was declining but every single person I talked to insisted that getting my BS (I already had my associates) was a good decision because having a college degree will get you a job no matter what. This is flat out

not true!



ETA: bitter much? ;)

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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My parents had no money. They struggled my whole life to afford like food and house payments. Many people are now wheres the 30 000 for uni going to come from. I don't get it.

Mrs. - posted on 04/24/2012

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I started a RESP for my daughter when she was 2 months old.

My parents offered to foot my entire bill at the same time as footing the last year of my older brother's school. I was such a spoiled, entitled brat that, without them asking, I took a year off to give them an easier time of things (I could hear them talking about it a lot, being very stressed about it) and took that time to save up for both a trip to Europe and pay for my first year's tuition. No one asked me to do that, I wanted to do that. That's what came from my parents offering me a "free ride". I was super responsible and worked to pay for some of it despite not being asked to. Just sayin'.

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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I would actually hate to be a parent in a place that didn't have HECS. My parents paid my sisters rent for 3 years and that was expensive enough. Let alone paying for the actual uni fees.

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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Yeah a gap year is just a year of working a job or backpacking overseas getting life experience and/or saving some money up towards stuff for uni rather than going straight from school to uni.

Lady Heather - posted on 04/24/2012

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Now you could go get a BEd, but in my province archaeology is not a "teachable" subject so you can't teach past elementary school. There are a few other applications but it's not something particularly valued so you generally won't make over 20 bucks an hour without at least an MA. Poli sci degrees are much more broadly applicable. My sister and her husband both studied poli sci and have always been employable.

Johnny - posted on 04/24/2012

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My niece is managing to swing quite a successful career with a political science degree. Sometimes it is a matter of luck and being at the right place at the right time. She left the federal Health Ministry hear for a job at a university two months before everyone in her department was laid off. Most of them will be unlikely to find jobs in that field now.



Scientific fields have also always been considered good career moves, at least here. Now that these government budget cuts are coming along, there are going to be a lot of unemployed scientists who will also struggle to find work. There are no firm guarantees. Every career choice can end up problematic in one's lifetime.

Jodi - posted on 04/24/2012

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Oh, I don't know, Heather, one of my University Profs, who's income isn't exactly a pittance here, has a background in history and archaeology and went into education :P

Lady Heather - posted on 04/24/2012

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Nursing here is still a shoe in. Nearly anything medically related is a great choice. If my kids ask my opinion I'll tell them to be engineers like their dad. Four years of school and five years of working and he is well into six figures. I will also tell them not to go into archaeology unless they are Indiana Jones or sonething. Fml. I had fun though.

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Nursing is in high demand here, but the pay for nurses without a BS degree is very low--I forget what they are called, CNA, I think--Certified Nursing Assistant, then an RN is an actual Registered nurse which requires the full BS, but even an RN with a lot of experience doesn't earn a whole lot. I don't see the appeal, but people are flocking to the nursing courses. I don't like hospitals....



I didn't think about it until Krista E mentioned it, but she makes a very good point. I do pressure J to go to college close to home. We do travel extensively, so perhaps I can offset it that way. I would not want J to be bitter about staying close to home because he felt forced by me, but at the same time, I do not like the thought of him being all the way across the country either. I guess we'll cross that bridge when we come to it, and for now, I will try to lay off the influence :P



Someone asked about "for-profit" colleges. A lot of the online colleges that are popping up are, but not all of them--some are legit. A for profit college will accept anyone, they have no admission standards. For profit schools do not put income back into the school the way a traditional college is required to; they are set up as businesses, whereas traditional colleges are set up as educational institutions. The latter requires officials to have set salaries and profits to be reinvested back into the school, for-profits distribute profit among owners and/or investors--their goal is not education, it is to make a profit. Not sure if that clarifies it or not, I don't know all the legal specifics, but I know that a for-profit school is required to let potential students know it is a for-profit and not a traditional school.

Janice - posted on 04/24/2012

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So who pays for the gap year, if you don't go into armed forces?



If you planned to pay for your child's college would you pay for a year off for them to "find" themselves?

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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We have what's called a gap year sometimes. A year of doing nthing or travelling.

Jodi - posted on 04/24/2012

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Maybe that is where we differ Krista. Australians are actually the most travelled people in the world (there are statistics on that), and yet it is not common for our children to go to University away from home unless it is necessary. Our kids, however, do tend to still get those experiences in other ways. Very few have never been beyond their own area of Australia. I don't see it as an issue.

Krista - posted on 04/24/2012

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I forgot about NSCAD and the NSAC. My bad. And yes, around here, if you become a nurse, you will NEVER lack for work! It's a great career if you want a lot of options as to where you want to live in Canada -- you could live pretty much anywhere in the country and find work in your field.

One other thing that I wanted to mention about my child and his post-secondary education -- I will not be pressuring him to stay close to home. My mom did that to me, so I never left Atlantic Canada. Now, it is one of my bitterest regrets -- that I did not take the opportunity to broaden my horizons and live in another part of Canada, or even another country, for at least part of my schooling. I fully plan to encourage my child(ren) to look at educational possibilities around the globe, not just in their own tiny backyards.

Jodi - posted on 04/24/2012

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Where I live, teaching is guaranteed income, pretty much, They can NEVER get enough casual teachers, so even if you can't initially get a full time job, you can get almost full time doing relief teaching. So while that may not be ideal, there are a lot of contract and casual positions available. Believe me, I looked into it before I went and enrolled for the year. However, it also is highly recognised for HR and various other positions as well, including in government, etc. It is also internationally transportable (apparently the qualification I get is recognised in many countries - in fact, I am studying with many Americans...I have been told it is a cheaper degree for them, even paying International Student rates, that studying in the US).

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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I think that there is way more jobs in nursing and you can get a job wherever you go in those industries. We have to live here so Damo can work and make a decent wage if I had finished my nursing I could live wherever I wanted and make money.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Ah, nursing is still very much needed here in NS. They are crying for nurses. My neighbour is a nurse and she is stuck working 16 hour shifts 5 days/week because of the shortage (she likes the extra money though, since it is OT). I suppose it really depends on where you live.

Mary - posted on 04/24/2012

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Actually, nursing is no longer a sure bet either. It used to be true, but the reality is that an inexperienced new grad is now taking at least one year to find a job - and not necessarily in a specialty of their choice. The shitty economy has meant that a lot of nurses who would have retired, gone part time, or become a sahm no longer have that luxury. As well, hospitals and other healthcare employers have pretty much cut things down to the bare bones with staffing in response to decreased volumes and revenues.



I was one of those nurses. My plan after my daughter was born was to drop to part time...and then, 3 weeks before I delivered, my husband was laid off. I didn't become a sahm until just before her 2nd bday - and it was not my choice to wait that long.



Every so often, I peruse the available positions at about 10 different hospitals within a (reasonable) driving distance of my home. Compared to just 5 years ago, it's slim pickings - and all of those posted positions require a minimum of 2 years experience in that particular specialty.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Also, like I said, most everyone I know that went to University are now working in some minimum/hour job or working multiple of them or have had to completely switch their career choice. As for the ones I know that went to a Community College, every single one of them are working within their chose career path, that they took in the College. When I did 2 of my 4 years at the Community College, their were 3 adults in my class, that had spent 4-8 years in Universities and still could not get a job. 2 of 3 now have great careers, the other one, dropped out before the 2 years was done.



As I said, I don't care too much what my kids pick but of course I will speak very highly of the Community College path. Simply because I know they are almost guarenteed a good career directly upon graduating (as long as they are serious students), whether it be a trade or some business path or IT. If they choose University, then I will definitely help them assess what is offered and guide them toward a practical path. Since they will be paying for a lot of it, I want to make sure they are interested the entire time and take it seriously.

Janice - posted on 04/24/2012

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"Also I think student debt is part of life. It's an investment in your future and it's worth getting a loan if that's what you want to do, it's worth the repayments to have a stable career that's going somewhere."



I used to think that but almost everyone with my degree in my graduating class have retail jobs making minimum wage.

Janice - posted on 04/24/2012

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Stifler's mom - I have my bachelor degree in education and getting a job is near impossible in my area. There typically over 500 applicants for every position opening and their have been layoffs in most district for the past 3 years. I know its different everywhere but the market has been tough for over 10 years in my area, so I don't think education is ever a sure bet for a job.



I hope your kids pick nursing ;)

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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Also I think student debt is part of life. It's an investment in your future and it's worth getting a loan if that's what you want to do, it's worth the repayments to have a stable career that's going somewhere.

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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If my kids pick nursing or bachelor of education or something they can get a job in straight away I'm all for helping them out financially if they need 8000 to do their endorsed enrolled nursing at TAFE. But it would be an interest free loan not a handout. But I'm not paying for changing courses, and spending 10 years in uni on my dollar. I think that it's good to support yourself anyway. If you don't have a job from the get go and you end up just quitting uni what are the chances of getting a job at all if you have no resume and haven't worked for the last 5 years. They're going to give it to joe blow who's been in the work force since 15.

Janice - posted on 04/24/2012

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Kelly, an you give an example of a for profit college? Are you talking about all the online universities that have suddenly popped up?

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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A bursary is given to those students that have a financial need for help. They can apply for it at the beginning of both semesters per year.

It is a grant from the school to help pay for the fees.

Janice - posted on 04/24/2012

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Kelly I had to look it up. My understanding is that a bursary is a grant that private schools sometimes give out to students with financial difficulties.



I received what my college called "The Saint Rose Difference" my last 2 semesters. It was a free 1,000$ off the 12,000$ bill.



There are 5 colleges/ universities with-in 15 miles of my home (not including any 2 year or trade schools) but only 1 is public. The public university did not offer my major :(



I definitely plan to influential in my children's college decisions. I made many poor choices when it came to my education and I don't want my kids to make the choices. So I will not allow any liberal arts major - my dime or not! ;)

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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I have not heard of any "for profit" colleges or Universities here, in NS. Not positive though. Just haven't heard of them, so I assume if they are around, there aren't many.

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There are about 4.6 million in SC. The 80 or so colleges I saw included community colleges/trade schools, but did not include "For Profit" schools, which I don't trust as true colleges. Many are not accredited, and have no admissions standards, so anyone can attend as long as they pay tuition. Tons of these are popping up in the States, is this an issue in Canada as well?



While I will allow J to study any field he likes, and support his decision financially as best I can, I will not pay for J to attend a for-profit school--He must choose a real university or trade school. While for-profit colleges account for less than 10% of US college graduates, their graduates are responsible for nearly 50% of all deferred and defaulted student loans, so I feel they are clearly doing something wrong that hinders their graduates from paying their loans back.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Krista--- Did you forget about Cape Breton University, Université Sainte-Anne. ;)

Universities
Acadia
Atlantic School of Theology
Dalhousie
Univ. of King's College
Mount Saint Vincent Univ.
NSAC
NSCAD
St. Francis Xavier
Saint Mary's
Cape Breton University
Université Sainte-Anne

http://www.novascotiaeducation.com/AbsPa...

Krista - posted on 04/24/2012

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There are 9 universities in Nova Scotia, Kelly, but probably about another 30 or so community colleges, technical schools, private career colleges and online colleges.





As far as footing the bill, I'm with you. I want my kids to focus and select their field of study carefully, and to have a plan in place. I don't want them to go "just because", and wind up wasting their time and my money. I know some parents are hugely opposed to letting their kids work a year or two prior to starting university, but if my kid has no idea what he wants to do, then damned if i'm going to pay for university while he's figuring that out. He can work, and he can spend that time doing his research and talking to career counselors and getting a better idea as to what field interests him. And once he has a general idea of where he wants to go in life, then he can research schools to figure out how best to attain that, and THEN he can go. But as he grows up, I fully plan on helping him figure that stuff out. If, in high school, Sam shows interest in becoming a doctor, well guess what? I'll set up an appointment for him with our doctor so that he can talk to him and find out what the job is like.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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I don't care what my child chooses. Hopefully it is something that she will not only enjoy but also make decent money, in order to sustain her life style thereafter.

However, I still don't plan on paying for it all. It is up to her to make some head way, too. ;)

We have 11 Universities (i just counted them all) and several Community Colleges throughout the province. I am sure there are private ones, I haven't checked. We also only have about 1 million people in NS. Not sure how many there are in SC.

Our Universities are some of the best in Canada. I know people from all over the Country that come here just for their studies.

Johnny - posted on 04/24/2012

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I will support most programs, but like you, if she wants to switch majors 20 times and has no goal, I won't fund that. If she needs time to figure herself out, I'm fine with her taking time out to work and travel. A "gap" year is a good way to explore yourself and the world a bit IMO.

[deleted account]

Please excuse my ignorance for a moment. What is a Bursary? Is that a discount or is it like a refund on monies that you have paid? Or is it just like a tax credit where you get to deduct that amount from your taxable income?

[deleted account]

It would be difficult to choose from only 8 or 9 colleges. Are there really so few in all of Nova Scotia?
We have about 80 to choose from in SC, but not all are public (the private ones have no in-state discount), and only one has a full architectural degree program, so if he sticks with that I will pay for him to go out of state if that is what he really wants to do.

Back on the topic of paying for college, do those of you who are planning to foot most of the bill feel like you should have a higher say in your children's choice of degree?
I plan to allow J to study anything he wishes, but I will draw the line at constantly swapping majors and staying in school forever. I know several parents who have told their children outright that they will not pay for an education in certain subjects.

Johnny - posted on 04/24/2012

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I'm not sure about the bursaries. We get a bursary here too, I hadn't really added that into the equation. I was speaking strictly of school fees. We also had a bursary that was given when you graduated high school and had admission to a university.



Our trades are done at community college too. It's just that now they are looking for more than just a high school diploma some of the time. My neighbor got his finishing carpentry ticket last year. To get into the program he had to have his GED and have completed a full year of general studies at a post-secondary institution. Then the program and the apprenticeship following.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Yep, it is Province wide. Which is what I said. ;)

Krista - posted on 04/24/2012

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I think that bursary is province-wide, MeMe. I just looked at the website for Saint Mary's University (or as we Dal folk used to call it, Robie Street High...)

In 2011-2012 , the Nova Scotia University Student Bursary was awarded to Nova Scotia and Domestic students as indicated below. It is anticipated this bursary program will continue for 2012-2013 academic year.

And yes, international student fees are a LOT higher.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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You're right, that $1300 is more than likely not going to affect a decision, I was just answering that there is a discount. I have not looked at the other 8-9 Universities we have in NS (5 of which are in HRM, Halifax). Perhaps some of the other's have more of a discount here. ;)

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In the US, the In-State discount is close to 50%. Clemson, for example is $27,000 for SC residents, and $43,100 for students residing outside SC. I'm not sure a $1300 discount would really effect anyone's decision, but saving $13,000 per year, would make me consider trying to choose a school within our state.



One up side to the states that Heather brings to mind is that it is very inexpensive to live on campus. Most on-campus housing is between $6,000 and $8,000 per year, or $500-$600/month. You would never find an apartment for that little, and the board fees are very low as well, so I guess that helps justify the higher tuition.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Johnny- I don't know about now, but when I applied to universities, I did applications for both in-province and out of province and the costs were the same regardless whether I was in or out of province. Including Dalhousie, Meme. Although it could have changed.

Yes, I don't know about then but I was just on the Dalhousie site yesterday and it specifically stated Residents of Nova Scotia may be eligible for a bursary up to $1,283 for the 2011-12 academic year; $261 for other Canadian students. So, whatever "may be" means I dunno, I assume it means for those that need help with funds. It isn't very much either but it isn't very costly anyhow, IF the person is able to remain living at home.

Some trades like plumbing, electrical and others are looking for at least some general college courses pre-entry.

Here in NS, these trades are completed at our Community College's. They are two year courses and then you must do your apprenticeship via an employer. We have 2 community college's in Halifax. One is all IT and Trade programs, the other is Business type programs.

Johnny - posted on 04/24/2012

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I don't know about now, but when I applied to universities, I did applications for both in-province and out of province and the costs were the same regardless whether I was in or out of province. Including Dalhousie, Meme. Although it could have changed. Like Heather said, it costs a lot more for international students. Although we do have agreements between BC, Washington State and Oregon where we can attend each other's universities for the in-state/province rates. My uncle went to University of Washington and my best friend at UVic came from Seattle, so it's not uncommon.



I want my daughter to go to the best school for her chosen career. Whether that is university, college or a trade school. I won't try to predetermine her educational direction for her. We are aiming to save to cover up to a master's degree in tuition and books (no living expenses). If she chooses trade school, We'll use the savings for something else. Most people I know who have a trades designation also have a university degree, my husband, most of his friends, my cousin. It's becoming quite a common entry requirement here for things like Power Engineering, Machinists and such. Some trades like plumbing, electrical and others are looking for at least some general college courses pre-entry. So many applicants for few spaces, they can afford to be choosy.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 04/24/2012

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Kelly---Are Universities like that in Canada? Do you get a discount for attending school in your province?

Yes - here in NS this is held true. They will get a discount if they live in Province of the University.

Lady Heather - posted on 04/24/2012

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I don't know of any discounts for in province. Internationals pay more though.



My biggest expense was definitely not tuition. Do not go to school in Vancouver if you want cheap living expenses. Well, unless you have parents there. The husband and I moved in together mainly because it was the only way we could live downtown.

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We will be able to comfortably afford his degree as long as he goes straight through and doesn't extend his time too far. If he goes beyond a Masters degree, he will probably have to be completely on his own; I doubt we can foot the bill for doctoral degrees without some major financial planning.



I looked into architecture schools across the country and most of them run between $40,000-$50,000 per year. Clemson is much less because we would get the In-State discount, but if we were out-of-state, it would be in that range as well. Furman is a private school, so there is no In-State discount. Are Universities like that in Canada? Do you get a discount for attending school in your province?

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