Tutoring children now begins as early as 1,2,3

Jodi - posted on 07/01/2012 ( 45 moms have responded )

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THE age of children seeking the help of tutors is getting younger and younger, with parents now forking out thousands of dollars to have preschooolers privately coached for school entrance assessments.
As part of dozens of school readiness programs across Sydney, children as young as three are learning how to count, sound letters and write their name to prepare for big school.

Parents hope it will give their child an edge in school entry interviews at private and Catholic schools and in the best start kindergarten assessment, which evaluates their skills when they start school.

Begin Bright early learning centre director Tina Tower said more than 600 children were enrolled in school readiness programs across five centres around Sydney.

Children attend weekly one-hour classes at a cost of $26 from age three.

"They learn all the foundations and develop a really good attitude to learning so when they start school they don't encounter any problems," Ms Tower said.

"We make sure that they can hold their pencil properly, they can write their name, know their alphabet and know their letter sounds."

She said the best start kindergarten assessment was difficult and most children would not be able to answer more than two questions if they were not prepared.

"That's a horrible introduction to school," she said.

Ms Tower said parents enrol young children after noticing how much an older sibling struggles at school. The program is about stimulating children's minds rather than pushy parents, she said.

Sydney Catholic Education office media spokesman Mark Rix said enrolments at systemic Catholic primary schools were made in accordance to set criteria, with priority given to baptised Catholic children of regularly worshipping families.

This is followed by children from orthodox churches, then other Christian churches, and lastly children from other faith traditions or non-religious backgrounds.

Mr Rix said the interview was to meet the family, not test the child's academic qualities.

"It's just about making sure the teachers know what they are ready for, so they have got strategies in place to help the child from day one," Mr Rix said. "It's not a determinant of enrolment."



Letting kids develop on their own

PROSPECTIVE kindergarten students at St Joseph's Primary School in Como, in Sydney's south, are asked to count, hold a pen and say their name during pre-enrolment interviews.

But the assessments are held to assess a student's development rather than determine whether they will be accepted, principal Anna Cindric says.

All families are interviewed regardless of the year of enrolment.

In a pre-kindergarten child, the principal looks for developmental signs such as speech, pencil grip and reading abilities.

"You're trying to get a picture of the child as a person and as a learner," Ms Cindric said, adding that she wanted to see whether a child needed learning intervention before starting school, rather than trying to select a smart student.

The school is a strong academic performer but Ms Cindric said the assessment was not used as a basis to knock children back and only to assess their development and what their needs would be if they were eventually enrolled in the school.

http://www.news.com.au/business/your-bus...

How young is too young for a tutor? Are parents overly competitive and putting too much pressure on their children? What are your thoughts?

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Alexis - posted on 07/08/2012

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Maybe I am weird, but my son turns 3 next month and he can count, knows his letters and we have been working on letter sounds. We also work with him on spelling his name and drawing shapes. I don't think my son is ahead of the game or anything, I just don't understand why one would hire a tutor to do something I thought parents were suppose to do or fully capable of doing? I also don't understand why we wait until they are 5 (kindergarten) to teach them these things when they are fully capable and willing at a much younger age. Don't get me wrong though, we don't have schedule or strict rules about having to learn this stuff as you may with a tutor we just work it into everyday learning, like what sound does a cow make.

Vicki - posted on 07/06/2012

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Young children learn best through play. In Scandinavian countries formal schooling doesn't start until 6-7 years. Outcomes in those countries are no worse than other countries where they push kids into formal schoolwork at 3-4 years.

My boy will be going to a Steiner school for at least the early years, probably all of primary school. We go to the playgroup at the school now and have seen the work of the older children. Despite the fact that they don't officially learn to read and write until 6 the older children produce wonderful written work. I don't see the point in interrupting playtime for formal lessons. Yes in our modern world academic knowledge is required to get a job, but my son won't be looking for a job at 6 years old, so he doesn't need to be studying when he's 3. If he specifically asks me how to write his name or whatever I'll show him but otherwise it's play play play.

Jodi - posted on 07/03/2012

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Children in Australia only generally get held back based on emotional or social growth. Academic achievement rarely factors into it, because (1) it is believed (and understandably so) that holding a child back will interfere with emotional and social growth, which in turn has an even greater effect on academic achievement and (2) it is a far more sensible solution to provide the child with additional learning support.

Let's consider the literacy rates in the world, and those countries whose literacy rates are the most advanced are those countries who start the children with *formal* education at a LATER age.

Studies have also shown evidence that children learn best through PLAY. Play helps to solidify and give meaning to learning. Young children are unable to grasp abstract concepts, and to be quite honest, alphabets, numbers, etc, are quite abstract. Young children are not necessarily capable of attaching meaning to them. Some do, some don't. It has nothing to do with intelligence, and everything to do with developmental milestones.

IMO, no young child should be sitting entrance tests to get into Kindergarten, that's just fucking ridiculous.

Krista - posted on 07/06/2012

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I agree that it is important to know how to cook, fix things, and be generally self-sufficient. After Hurricane Juan, I saw how ill-prepared most urban dwellers are for even the most short-lived loss of modern conveniences, and it was a real eye-opener. Those are important life skills, absolutely. But they can be taught relatively quickly and easily. Math, reading and science provide a solid foundation for EVERYTHING else out there.

You can't be a very good cook if you don't know basic math (try doubling recipes if you don't know how to add fractions). You also can't fix or build things if you don't know math (ask any carpenter how much he uses math). And if you can't read, then you're vulnerable as hell to any predatory asshole who will be MORE than happy to tell you what that paper you're signing actually means.

I agree that tutors for babies is pretty ridiculous. But despite what people might think, the zombie apocalypse has not happened yet. So we DO need more than just basic self-sufficiency skills.

Sherri - posted on 07/06/2012

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@Erin Kids ought to be learning how to fish, hunt, preserve, cook, build things, etc, the things in life that are actually more important

Really Erin other than cooking I have never once used a one of this things and I am 40. Not a one of these other than cooking do I believe my kids will use in their lifetime either. We are not living in the stone age here.

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Faith - posted on 07/31/2012

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Amen Sister! Kids need to be taught by their parents all those things. But let them be kids!

Faith - posted on 07/31/2012

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Amen Sister! Kids need to be taught by their parents all those things. But let them be kids!

Jaime - posted on 07/29/2012

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No need for the iron gavel. I'm fully aware of the no T.H.U.M.P.S policy, and don't believe I have expressed any worry over the decision to delete her posts. I do think her overall opinion was valuable to the discussion, so hopefully she can come back and just omit any future solicitation in her comments.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/29/2012

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Jaime, there are MANY solicitors in this site. Every one of Helens 4 posts yes 4 were worded differently soliciting for business of tutoring. You don't know if she was a teenager, a mom, a business women, or a man. We do not tolerate soliciting on this site, only in certain areas of this site is it exceptable. It is right in the guidelines of the no THUMPS policy that is in place by the creators of CoM. If you have an issue with it, you can bring it up with management.

Otherwise, lets get this conversation back on topic.

Thank you,
~DM MoD Little Miss~

Jaime - posted on 07/29/2012

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I don't think Helen was focused so much on soliciting a job, than sharing her views about tutoring young children and offering people the chance to learn more about her program. And although this is a site for moms to share and chat and discuss, I don't see a problem with non-moms joining the discussion. If anything, it might have given Helen some pause to think about her stance on the issue. She's only a teenager so she has a lot to learn about the world in general, but I didn't think we were so one-minded that it mattered whether or not her interest stemmed from the perspective of a woman or a mother.

Dove - posted on 07/28/2012

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Thanks 'Little Miss'... sorry I didn't report that. I was 'trying' to give the girl the benefit of the doubt... or something like that. ;)

~♥Little Miss - posted on 07/28/2012

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~~~MOD WAARNING~~~

Solicitations will not be tolerated! And PLEASE always report solicitations so we can rid CoM of these headaches!

Thanks you
~DM Mod Little Miss~

Dove - posted on 07/28/2012

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Deleting this post since it doesn't make sense with the other posts that were deleted. ;)

Helen - posted on 07/28/2012

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Congratulations about your oldest daughter. I'm sure she will have a bright future ahead of her!
Yes, there are people who do not have time on their hands who need our services.

Many thanks,
Helen

Sylvia - posted on 07/28/2012

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Erin, I agree it's ridiculous and a waste of money, but if you think better-off people hiring tutors to give their already privileged kids an even bigger advantage is "socialist", you need to get a better dictionary o_O

Dove - posted on 07/27/2012

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Oh and I did forget to mention that my oldest taught herself to read at 3.5 and was reading chapter books in K.... That's not what makes her smart now because even though she could READ at that age.... comprehension took quite a while to catch up because their young brains have a lot of trouble making sense of chapter book stories when they are at the age that they 'should' just be starting to read.

What makes her still at the tops of all her classes some 7 years later is the fact that she LOVES to learn and WANTS to learn. You can't pay someone to teach THAT to a child.

Jaime - posted on 07/27/2012

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"although school starts at around 5 or 6, the ATTITUDE towards education MUST be cultivated earlier to be the most successful." I agree that the attitude towards education should be cultivated early, but our definition of what constitutes a cultivation of education differs a smidge. When my son tells me a story or asks me a question...these are both opportunities to help him cultivate an understanding of his world. Fancy flash cards and 'your baby can read' gimmicks designed to pigeonhole a child into the category of 'superhuman' do very little to foster an understanding of what is being taught...it's all memorization at so young an age. I haven't met a six month old that can actually read...nor do I care to.

"My mother was very big on early learning"....the most effective way for a child to learn is through play, so although it's wonderful that your mother was a big supporter of early learning, it's not necessary to interfere with the natural process of learning through play and sensory perception early in life. Reading chapter books at age 4 puts you in a very tiny minority of children, and although an acceptance to MIT is an incredible accomplishment, I don't think it should be the primary goal at infancy.

One final though is that learning is not defined by or limited to text books, multiplication charts, or spelling dictation. Cultivating and encouraging education would be a hell of a lot easier if aduts would keep this in mind...

Dove - posted on 07/26/2012

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PARENTS can cultivate the love of learning in a child for free, Helen. WHY would anyone waste the money to hire a tutor for a toddler/preschool aged child? That is absurd.... IMO, of course, but what do I know? I'm just a mom with three very bright kids. ;)

Amanda - posted on 07/26/2012

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Alexis, my 2 yr knows all those things too because she wants to not because she's super smart or been pushed to learn them.

Jaime - posted on 07/09/2012

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I find that when adults interfere with too much structure, it tends to stifle the learning process. Balance seems to be the universal key to all things and this is no exception. Learning is something we do from the moment we're born and continue our entire lives. I don't really understand the excessive need to school young children, as if they will somehow leak intelligence if we don't plug them in to a source of "education" immediately following their first steps. When my son was an infant, my cousin offered to share her 'your baby can read' series so that I could get him started and I politely decline. I beg to differ that my baby can read at 6 months old...he can't wipe his own ass or hold a spoon, but he's reading Dickens in his crib...*eye roll*

Jodi - posted on 07/08/2012

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You're not weird Alexis, you are working with him through your contact and play with him. These people in the OP are actually specifically going out of their way to have their children TUTORED in these skills, which is ludicrous IMO.



@Vicki, the outcomes in those countries are actually better. I think we could all take a leaf out of their book with respect to literacy outcomes.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 07/06/2012

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"You really don't like these socialists do you Erin. Has it occurred to you that the above OP is much more capitalist and elitist nonsense? Could you please explain how it is socialist nonsense, because your debate, yet again, in nonsensical.

No Jodi, she can't. She's even convinced that the US, the country she lives in is socialist. This is the same person who claimed a month ago that Canada's health care system doesn't help the elderly and can't find facts to back it up nor does she come back to reply and back up her veiws.

In the US we have cut off dates for when our children can enroll in Kindergarten (The don't seem to have them here in Canada) and in New York state the cut off is the first of December, but if your child is near that date you can hold them back. My older daughter has ADHD and I believe bi-polar so I started her in Pre-K when she turned 5 and Kindergarten when she turned 6 ect ect because when she was age ready for Kindergarten I didn't feel she was emotionally ready for it. She's done fine and has gotten all 3s and 4s on her reportcards. She was in the excelled reading group in grade one. Her weak point right now is math, but only because she gets bored with it. But I did get hell from International Students for District 23 here in the Okanagan because I wanted to put my 6 year old who just left Kindergarten into grade 1 instead of grade 2 like they wanted.

I do feel tutoring a baby is extreme. Allowing your younger children to learn by having them play and do for themselves and figure out problems naturally works out better.

Finally I do feel cooking and maybe learning how to can or make jam is important and fun (yes I'm a dork I love to bake! I made cookies, banana bread and bannock yesturday even though it got up to 27 here and I can't have my screen open because my baby and the cats will escape.) However math and science are important as well because without math and science you won't know the hows and whys for when you do your cooking, baking or preserving. I also like knowing how to fix things and be self sufficient. But don't ask me to hunt or fish because I have bad aim and no patience.

Dove - posted on 07/06/2012

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Math, reading, and science ARE important... extremely important if you want anything more than a basic labor job. I do agree that they aren't the ONLY things that are important in education, but they should be the main focus.

Of course, I also personally love year round or modified traditional school schedules. 2-3 months out of school is too much for a kid unless the parents are supplementing things at home as well. ;)

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 07/06/2012

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I agree Sherri. Seriously, Erin has fallen off her rocker and I am beginning to feel she is a troll. Since, she has hit every single thread and cried about socialists. Even when the thread doesn't come close to a socialist idealism.



ETA:

I too, have never hunted, built much (unless it came out of a box) nor do we fish for our food (only for entertainment). We, of course, do cook and yes, this is important for kids to learn but it is a requirement to LIFE. If you don't cook, you don't eat (well, unless you are rich and eat out every meal).

Janice - posted on 07/06/2012

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I'm sure I cant see some posts but Jodi I completely agree about children learning through play and retention.
Studies have shown that if I child repeats a grade due to lack of academic progress they often only catch up for a year or two and then fall behind again. The better solution is to give additional support.
Getting additional support can be such a struggle though. My friend's daughter was very behind and she had to fight tooth and nail to get her help. It took her 6 meetings with the school for the 1st grade teacher to admit the child could not read. They still promoted her to 2nd grade but she will be in a classroom with extra support. This is a case where a child really could benefit from a tutor but she is almost 7, not 3.

Jodi - posted on 07/06/2012

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You really don't like these socialists do you Erin. Has it occurred to you that the above OP is much more capitalist and elitist nonsense? Could you please explain how it is socialist nonsense, because your debate, yet again, in nonsensical.

Erin - posted on 07/06/2012

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It sounds like a big waste of money and a bunch of socialist nonsense. I don't see how in this economy anyone can afford to tutor babies in pre-pre-school classes. I think kids are rushed and smothered by school and home work and don't get to be kids. I don't believe in year round school don't believe in most methods of testing, aptitude tests, or IQ tests. I can't stand that the government thinks the only respectable classes are math, reading and science. Kids ought to be learning how to fish, hunt, preserve, cook, build things, etc, the things in life that are actually more important. Math, reading and science is imprtant but it's just absolutley crammed down the kids' throats. Leave the poor kids alone already.

Dove - posted on 07/03/2012

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I'd rather risk having my kid do two years of K than higher a tutor at 2 though...

Of course, my 4 year old does already know most of your list to enter K and he's still got a full year of preschool left to go. ;)

Sherri - posted on 07/03/2012

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@Janice No they will not stop admittance into Kindergarten they will give some major support as if they don't know these things they are quite behind.

However, at the end of Kindergarten if they have not grasped at least most of them majorly I think at least 80-85% and some of them at least basicly, 15-20% they will hold back because these children will just fall further and further behind and never be able to catch up and learn what is required for the next grade too.

I won't lie our school system is tough. They also will typically have at least an hour of homework a night starting next year, not including projects etc. that need to be completed.

Jakki - posted on 07/03/2012

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Yeah Jopi - that's my experience too. Last year we had some trouble with our Year 1 child - she was really behind everybody else with her reading and maths.

We talked about holding her back because she was on the young side for the year and could have done year 1 again. But they said "nope - social integration and emotional maturaity is what we look at, nothing to do with academic levels".

So she's in Year 2 now - having lots of fun doing cartwheels with her friends, but not blitzing the academic world!

Janice - posted on 07/03/2012

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Sherri will they actually not allow admittance into kindergarten or grade promotion if children dont know these things? It is similar (although some of that is definitely still 1st grade stuff here) for my area but those or more the ideal and not required. Holding kids back almost never occurs. They will typically promote a child and then give them support.

Sherri - posted on 07/02/2012

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Things and times have changed in order for my son to be prepared for Kindergarten this past year. He needed to know his ABC's upper case and lower case, be able to spell his first and last name, be able to count and write #'s from 1-20, know his phone # and address, know all his colors.



By the end of Kindergarten he had to know this in order to advance to first grade.



Read 100 sight words, Be able to know and recognize money and their values, be able to add and subtract, Algebraic notation and solving number sentences, Patterns and functions, Plane and solid figures, Count on by 1s to 150; count on by 2s, 5s,and 10s and count back by 1s with number grids, number lines, Rational counting, Place value and notation, Meanings and uses of fractions, Data analysis, Qualitative probability,Length, weight, and angles, Temperature and Time.



These things some of them I didn't even begin to learn till 1st or 2nd grade. Oh and this is public school too by the way.

Lady Heather - posted on 07/02/2012

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Gah! Just let them be kids ffs! I so agree - if they don't love it you are only doing them a disservice by pushing them to learn too quickly. Children learn naturally. They have so much to soak up as it is. They don't need lessons on top of that. That said, my daughter just turned three and she does all those things. But she does it because she wants too. Just one day last week she started printing her name out of the blue. I had nothing to do with it. Now she has me print words and she copies because she thinks it's fun. I was the same and was reading a couple months later. Well guess what? I'm not some super genius now. I haven't done anything totally awesome for the planet. I didn't even go to some prestigious university. Early literacy doesn't predict anything about future life. I'm not an idiot. That's about all you can predict from it.

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i think that's a bit premature. i understand if your child already has a diagnosed developmental or learning disability to give them a bit of extra help, but for the average child i feel it's uneccesary.

Corinne - posted on 07/02/2012

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I'm in the U.K. Here kids get 15hrs free nursery per week from the age of 3yrs. I put both of mine in to the nursery attatched to the primary school I wanted them to attend, as it gave them a better chance of getting in there. M will go into yr2 this time and D moves up from nursery to reception class. The nursery kids learn through play and rhyme time, most of them can now sing their ABC's and 1,2,3,4,5, once I caught a fish.... they're now learning to write their names. (This is all stuff that I've been doing with them at home btw, I'm not leaving it to the school!) When D starts reception class in Sept he will be 4yrs & 2weeks old, he will be expected to read and write his own name, recognise numbers and letters, colours and shapes.
I think paying a tutor to drill your kids, is a waste of time and money and a lazy assed way of doing things. Get off your butts and sing to, play with, read to your child; that is how they will learn.

Mary - posted on 07/02/2012

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Tracey, I was thinking the same thing, lol. My daughter could spell and write her name by the age of 3, count to 20, and tell you the sounds that pretty much every letter makes. Sure, I "work" with her some, but if I were being honest, much of that she probably learned from watching cartoons on PBS (Super Why and Word World in particular).

She does go to preschool, but it is a play-based learning environment without any pressure on academic-type stuff. IMO, life for this age group should be fun, free, and full of play.

Tracey - posted on 07/02/2012

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My kids knew their letters and numbers before starting school, they had a very good educator - it was called Sesame Street.

Janice - posted on 07/02/2012

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Why a tutor? Why not just send them to preschool where they get to play and learn?

I'm in the states and when you enroll your child in kindergarten at age 5 they do an assessment just to give teachers a starting point for each child. As a teacher my self I know its important to understand what each child knows (or doesn't) in order to teach them. I would need to know that most of my incoming class know the alphabet except Joe & Sue so that I not bore the majority and give help to those who need it. But unfortunately I could totally see some parents seeing this a test to be mastered and getting a tutor or something.

But I do think pre-school is very important. We have moved down the learning criteria for each grade, so what was taught in 1st grade 10 years ago, like reading, is now taught in kindergarten. It used to be that K was all about socialization and just starting to learn the alphabet and how to count. Now children are expected to know the alphabet and be ready to start letter sound association. I do think that pre-school is appropriate and necessary. I mean if an only child goes to school with out ever learning how to work in a large group setting they will probably struggle with the demands of kindergarten even if mom and dad taught them the ABCs. Pre-school should be all about fun and playing while sneaking in lots of learning, well actually kindergarten should be much of that too.

Its unfortunate that some people are so focused on their child's future adult life that they forget that they will only be little for a short time. Let them play!

Jenni - posted on 07/02/2012

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Geesh, they're already starting school a year earlier than when I was a kid. In addition, at least here in Ontario, the Junior/Senior Kindergarten program will be switching to full time. No adjustment period whatsoever. Yeah, so imo it's too much. Let them have a bit of free time to learn and adjust to the world before you start throwing deadlines, homework assignments and instruction at them.



It also sounds a wee bit lazy. It's pretty easy to teach these things to your kids yourself by just incorporating it into their routine and play. I didn't find it required much effort at all to teach my kids their shapes, colours, numbers, letters (sounds), spelling their name, (all the basic knowledge that will make adjusting to kindergarten go more smoothly) by 3-4 years old. Preshoolers want to KNOW everything! It's the perfect time to teach them, I agree with that. But isn't that half the fun of being a parent? Why pay someone else to do it? You're just giving up essential bonding time. There's plenty of time for school in the near future for them.

MeMe - Raises Her Hand (-_-) (Mommy Of A Toddler And Teen) - posted on 07/02/2012

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Poor kids! I could never understand, not just letting kids be kids. I dunno, I am not looking to create a rocket scientist at the age of 1, 2 or 3. I firmly believe letting them learn through play. I am not really even into structured play, until they are older, like 4 and getting ready for school. I prefer to give them options and let them decide on what they would like to do.



I never tutored my daughter (as a toddler) and she is going into grade 8 with solid A's and B's. She has always been an A, B student. I fail too see why anyone wants to push their child.



I really think this is way over the top and I truly feel bad for any kids that are forced to do this. :(



ETA:

I do put my kids in Daycare and they teach them a lot, there. Then we pick it up at home. It isn't hard. Kids are pretty damn smart little criters. ;)

Amanda - posted on 07/01/2012

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I am a mum in Australia and my son will be starting school in January, so at the moment I am going through the enrolement process and waiting on an interview.

In my opinion my son is way too young for a tutor, I wouldn't use one, and yes I do think it's over competitive parents trying to out do each other through their kids.

From asking around other mums and teachers I know, the things they ask a child to be able to do before starting school is to be able to recognise their own belongings, follow simple instructions and be able to take themselves to the toilet.
Yes my son can hold a pen properly, wirte his name, can count, knows his alpahbet and some letter sounds but he has learnt them because he was interested and wanted to learn these things not because I forced them upon him.
Kids have 12 yrs of schooling ahead of them, let them be kids while they can. If they need tutoring later on then so be it but at kindy age, leave them be.

Stifler's - posted on 07/01/2012

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I think this is way overboard. Just like 6 month olds playing iPads. Ridiculous.

Krista - posted on 07/01/2012

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Sigh...poor kids. Let them play! That's how they learn best anyway.

Dove - posted on 07/01/2012

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My thoughts.... 'Tutoring' a preschooler or younger age kid (not including special needs things, speech therapy, etc...) is absolutely ridiculous. Your average, every day kid will learn just fine through play and being read to in those early years. The most important 'skill' to empower a young child with is the love of learning and 'tutoring' at a young age seems more likely to achieve the exact opposite effect. Sure, they may read or add at an early age, but if it's all about the learning and not the mere joy of learning something new.... what good is it for the future?

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