US has the BODY of Osama Bin Laden

♏*PHOENIX*♏ - posted on 05/01/2011 ( 357 moms have responded )

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It is reported that he is Dead, killed in Afghanistan

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Vegemite - posted on 05/03/2011

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"It was signed in Belfast on 10 April 1998 (Good Friday) by the British and Irish governments and endorsed by most Northern Ireland political parties. On 23 May 1998 the Agreement was endorsed by the voters of Northern Ireland in a referendum. On the same day, voters in the Republic of Ireland voted separately to change their constitution in line with the Agreement. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) was the only large party that opposed the Agreement. The Agreement came into force on 2 December 1999."
from wiki

Vegemite - posted on 05/03/2011

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No just there is an agreement but it's not really being followed by either party but no one is actively involved in war activities so as usual this lack of commitment and will is being brushed under the carpet. Of course they blame each other.

[deleted account]

I dont' mean to derail so i'll try to keep this brief. Are you saying that they don't vote for it because they're prevented from doing so?

Vegemite - posted on 05/03/2011

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Yes there is an accord but Northern Ireland is still part of Britain the IRA has not disarmed and the Irish Guard (a section of the British Military) are still visible in public. The marching season still continues where Protestants march through Catholic neighbourhoods and the walls still stand and have been reinforced. There were also talks in feb 2010 that have yet to see any results from. So yes there is an accord but nothing has changed except day to day life is a little better than before.

[deleted account]

"They also occupy part of Irish soil and call it Northern Ireland"

Christinie, I don't pretend by any means to be an expert in your nation's poltics but wasn't there some agreement recently that a majority vote in NE would allow that part of the country to become part of Ireland? I'm probably not phrasing it properly but I remember reading something on Wiki about it. Belfast Accord or something?

Vegemite - posted on 05/03/2011

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This is exactly how i feel Jenny and the poverty that exists in this developed country is appalling. I don't understand the priorities of the U.S. government.

Jenny - posted on 05/03/2011

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This describes how I feel about it all:

TZM: Response to Media; Death of Osama bin Laden



On May 1, 2011 Pres. Barack Obama appeared on national television with the spontaneous announcement that Osama bin Laden, the purported organizer of the tragic events of September 11th 2001, was killed by military forces in Pakistan.



Within moments, a media blitz ran across virtually all television networks in what could only be described as a grotesque celebratory display, reflective of a level of emotional immaturity that borders on cultural psychosis. Depictions of people running through the streets of New York and Washington chanting jingoistic American slogans, waving their flags like the members of some cult, praising the death of another human being, reveals yet another layer of this sickness we call modern society.



It is not the scope of this response to address the political usage of such an event or to illuminate the staged orchestration of how public perception was to be controlled by the mainstream media and the United States Government. Rather the point of this article is to express the gross irrationality apparent and how our culture becomes so easily fixed and emotionally charged with respect to surface symbology, rather than true root problems, solutions or rational considerations of circumstance.



The first and most obvious point is that the death of Osama bin Laden means nothing when it comes to the problem of international terrorism. His death simply serves as catharsis for a culture that has a neurotic fixation on revenge and retribution. The very fact that the Government which, from a psychological standpoint, has always served as a paternal figure for it citizens, reinforces the idea that murdering people is a solution to anything should be enough for most of us to take pause and consider the quality of the values coming out of the zeitgeist itself.



However, beyond the emotional distortions and tragic, vindictive pattern of rewarding the continuation of human division and violence comes a more practical consideration regarding what the problem really is and the importance of that problem with respect to priority.



The death of any human being is of an immeasurable consequence in society. It is never just the death of the individual. It is the death of relationships, companionship, support and the integrity of familial and communal environments. The unnecessary deaths of 3000 people on September 11, 2001 is no more or no less important than the deaths of those during the World Wars, via cancer and disease, accidents or anything else.



As a society, it is safe to say that we seek a world that strategically limits all such unnecessary consequences through social approaches that allow for the greatest safety our ingenuity can create. It is in this context that the neurotic obsession with the events of September 11th, 2001 become gravely insulting and detrimental to progress. An environment has now been created where outrageous amounts of money, resources and energy is spent seeking and destroying very small subcultures of human beings that pose ideological differences and act on those differences through violence.



Yet, in the United States alone each year, roughly 30,000 people die from automobile accidents, the majority of which could be stopped by very simple structural changes. That's ten 9/11's each year... yet no one seems to pine over this epidemic. Likewise, over 1 million Americans die from heart disease and cancer annually - causes of which are now easily linked to environmental influences in the majority. Yet, regardless of the over 330 9/11's occurring each year in this context, the governmental budget allocations for research on these illnesses is only a fraction of the money spent on “anti-terrorism” operations.



Such a list could go on and on and with regard to the perversion of priority when it comes to what it means to truly save and protect human life and I hope many out there can recognize the severe unbalance we have at hand with respect to our values.



So, coming back to the point of revenge and retribution, I will conclude this response with a quote from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., likely the most brilliant intuitive mind when it came to conflict and the power of non-violence. On September 15, 1963 a Birmingham Alabama church was bombed, killing four little girls attending Sunday school.



In a public address, Dr. King stated:



“What murdered these four girls? Look around. You will see that many people that you never thought about participated in this evil act. So tonight all of us must leave here with a new determination to struggle. God has a job for us to do. Maybe our mission is to save the soul of America. We can't save the soul of this nation throwing bricks. We can't save the soul of this nation getting our ammunitions and going out shooting physical weapons. We must know that we have something much more powerful. Just take up the ammunition of love.”

- Dr. Martin Luther King, 1963



~Peter Joseph

www.thezeitgeistmovement.com

Amber - posted on 05/02/2011

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Ohh...Bush Jr. didn't declare war; only Congress has the power to declare war. So, if we're putting together a lynch mob, add them to the list please? They are just as responsible and nobody ever blames them.

Amber - posted on 05/02/2011

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I'll rejoice when we have true peace. When the man I love isn't living hours away from me tending to soldiers who are coming home from war injured, emotionally exhausted, and stressed beyond belief. When I'm not waiting for the phone call to tell me that he's getting on a plane because they need physicians over seas. When my son isn't hugging a teddy bear made of a military uniform with his daddy's picture on it to fall asleep at night because he misses him so much, then I'll rejoice.

I'll rejoice when one of our dearest friends is on a plane home from Afghanistan alive and is able to hug his two sons again, sons that are missing their father desperately.

I will not rejoice because one man is dead and our circumstances have not changed at all. I will not mourn his death, but I won't be celebrating it either. Not until those I love and hold close to my heart are out of danger and can sleep peacefully knowing that they aren't going back.

That would be something worth celebrating.

Firebird - posted on 05/02/2011

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"I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr

Vegemite - posted on 05/02/2011

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Laura the IRA is a legitimate army just like the U.S.A.'s take it or leave it. Eire has been at war with Britain for nearly 500 years we are forced to change our country's name and the names of it's cities, speak another language and even anglicize our own last names. On my passport I have two last names yet my real last name is not allowed to be used on my birth cert. The British army came into Irish homes and killed families, they line the streets of Ireland with their guns. Until the late 70's there was the same kind of prejudice against the Irish as there is now against Muslims. Look up bloody sunday. Look up the potato famine. They also occupy part of Irish soil and call it Northern Ireland. Yet the British have the gall to call the IRA a terrorist group give me a break. Wake up and smell the propaganda surrounding this war, get an education on the real situation in Ireland before you compare the Irish Republican Army to Al Quaeda. It's extremely offensive, especially to those who have lost family members or friends.



Get an understanding of the desperate poverty and starvation the people of Ireland have endured up until my father's generation. My Father's family was considered lower middle class. He lived in an apartment building of 13 rooms, and I mean rooms not real apartments. They shared one bathroom and shower indoors and one bathroom and shower outdoors between the 13 different groups of people that lived in the building. Think about that, imagine having to shower outside in the snow. Imagine that and being starved as well resorting to stealing food so you didn't have to bother your parents for food because you knew they didn't have it. Mother's feeding their babies sugar water because they had nothing else and no breast milk because of their own malnutrition and watching them starve to death.

What a load of bollocks! Has anyone intervened for Eire? No, instead they call the IRA a terrorist group and scoff at her people and their suffering.

[deleted account]

Two things i have read have stuck out to me :

Osama bin Laden is gone, and that is better than the alternative. But the celebration over his death feels misplaced. The remnants of his most successful strike on American soil remain intact through the collective sense of powerlessness that frames the conversation. He has proven to our adversaries that, when we are frightened, we lose our way. Until we find our way back, standing in the street, high-fiving his death may feel good, but our circumstances are little changed.
Huffpost.

"WTC= 3,000 deaths and climbing.
7,000+ American and coalition soldiers killed and climbing
1,000+ American amputees and climbing.
10s of thousands of American soldiers will suffer debilitate­ing PTSD from multiple tours.
Our true financial cost since 9/11 is now somewhere in the range of almost 4 TRILLION dollars.
These things are in addition to our rights and freedoms we have allowed to be quietly stripped from us.
100,000 more useless,wa­steful government employees we didnt need.
America has joined Third world tyrants who hold prisoners for years with no counsel and no trial.
We have kept in prison for years people we KNOW are innocent.
The world now knows that tortureing prisoners is the new American way.
All this for the CRIMINAL act of a few.Its been a decade of horrible choices.Is there anyone who truly believes that had this been treated for what it was,a criminal act,that this guy wouldnt have been caught/kil­led long ago?
If they had simply let things calm down,he would have popped his head up much sooner than this.
This clearly was a job for Interpol,C­IA etc,not armies.
I hate what Bin Laden did.How I prayed for him to suffer and die a horrible slow death.
But,he and his supporters have to laugh at the mileage they got out of their devious plot.
I am positive that in their wildest dreams,the­y couldnt have envisioned the carnage not at WTC,but what we did to ourselves in reaction to it. "

Johnny - posted on 05/02/2011

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Logically, it bothers me. Emotionally, I'm happy they killed him, I hope it was painful, I hope that his vision of heaven is the wrong one (no 77 virgins) and that he will just fade into nothingness.

The US is not an innocent bystander in the world. But NO ONE, no matter what, ever deserved what was done on 9/11 in the US. Nor in the UK on 7/05. Nor in Spain on 3/04. Nor in India (Bombay) in 3/03. Nor in Indonesia in 10/02. Nor in Turkey in 11/03.... There is never a reason that excuses terrorism.

Killing Bin Laden makes us feel a bit better. But I don't think it will do anything to stop or stem the tide. It doesn't matter who is doing it, the hatred fueled by any time of extremism is a dangerous thing, and seems to be more and more popular across the world.

[deleted account]

We certainly need to be on our guard - not just the US, but her allies. I abhore Bin Ladin and all he stoo for, bet let's not forget that he had plenty of financial support from other parts of the world, such as the US. That should cause a bit of eye-rolling.

LadyJane - posted on 05/02/2011

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It's about time that man got killed. I'm not sad at all. Not one bit. Too many other people had to die while he sat laughing at their sorrow. While I'm not one for dancing in the street and having a big ole party, this does bring those families a little bit of temporary relief. Sure no terror ever really goes away, but there will be some time while they re-organize their 'plans'. We still need to be on our guard and not let this victory weaken us.

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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exactly why I say that what he did was wrong, there was no excuse for it...and that he deserves to be dead.

I stand by the fact that singing, dancing, doing back flips is creepy.

and I happen to love America...I just have issues with her foreign policy.

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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I'm sorry...did you miss the MANY times I said he was evil and there was no excuse for what he did?

I never said it was OK...what I said was please STOP saying that the US was simply an innocent bystander who had never done anything wrong.

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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@ Laura - you know I love you too. But you do have a chip on your shoulder where it comes to the US. There are certainly many many things wrong with this country, just as there are many many things wrong with Holland and any other country on the planet. But there are also many things right and seeing my adoptive country accused over and over of arrogance, mild retardation etc. really grates on me sometimes. It's not just you, I just zeroed in on you. But it feels like we always try to be so understanding and culturally sensitive to every other country out there, but it's a sport to bash the US.

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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To me it's like accusing a woman of bringing rape upon herself because she was dressed provocatively. Or because she went back to the hotel room with the guy and then changed her mind. Of course the US could have done things better throughout its history. In that entire article though I didn't see any occupation of any country. Meddling in their affairs to further their own agenda sure, but I don't see any colonized countries. And sometimes that kind of meddling is only too welcome. Like when the Nazis got their asses handed to them. Or should the US have been more sensitive to their sensibilities too? After all they were just trying to further the interests of blonde people. You know I think Bush Jr was a total failure, a war criminal and an outright ass. But he didn't make a complete fool of himself until after 9/11 (just a minor fool). Osama bin Laden just wanted someone to blame for the failings of his part of the world. People tend to do that, because it's easier than being introspective. That pattern has been repeated many times over throughout history. The US certainly had a hand in some of those failings, but it would have been a hell of a lot more productive if they had looked inward and fixed some of the issues that were fundamentally wrong within their own society. And what was the reason for the attacks in Madrid and Yemen and Bali? Guilt by association?
Also, it always annoys the hell out of me that people disparage the US for spending so much on defense and for projecting it’s military might, but whenever there is trouble in the world, what country does everyone look to to sort things out? Here’s a hint: it’s not Canada. When Yugoslavia was falling apart, the European Union was utterly helpless in dealing with it. We love to boast about our social programs but if we had to really be able to defend ourselves and come to the aid of others in the world without the US we would have to spend a lot more on defense than we do now, and there would be much less budget left for things like free education and universal healthcare.

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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and Esther, I adore you so I will ask you to reserve the eye rolling and sarcasm...I've expected that from other people I've debated politics with but not you.

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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To be honest...this whole thing (much like the issues between Israel and Palestine) reminds me a little too much of the Hatfields and the McCoys...

"an eye for an eye makes everybody blind"

Bonnie - posted on 05/02/2011

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I don't know if someone already said this or not, I haven't read all the posts, but many people out there are thinking her really is not dead.

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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When Iranian revolutionaries entered the U.S. embassy in Tehran in 1979 and seized 52 Americans, President Jimmy Carter dismissed reminders of America's long intervention in Iran as "ancient history." Carter's point was not merely that previous U.S. policy could not excuse the hostage taking. His adjective also implied that there was nothing of value to be learned from that history. In his view, dredging up old matters was more than unhelpful; it was also dangerous, presumably because it could only serve the interests of America's adversaries. Thus, to raise historical issues was at least unpatriotic and maybe worse.[1]

As the United States finds itself in the aftermath of another crisis in the Middle East, it is worth the risk of opprobrium to ask why there should be hostility toward America in that region. Some insight can be gained by surveying official U.S. conduct in the Middle East since the end of World War II. Acknowledged herein is a fundamental, yet deplorably overlooked, distinction between understanding and excusing. The purpose of this survey is not to pardon acts of violence against innocent people but to understand the reasons that drive people to violent political acts.[2] The stubborn and often self-serving notion that the historical record is irrelevant because political violence is inexcusable ensures that Americans will be caught in crises in the Middle East and elsewhere for many years to come.

Sheldon L. Richman is senior editor at the Cato Institute.

After 70 years of broken Western promises regarding Arab independence, it should not be surprising that the West is viewed with suspicion and hostility by the populations (as opposed to some of the political regimes) of the Middle East.[3] The United States, as the heir to British imperialism in the region, has been a frequent object of suspicion. Since the end of World War II, the United States, like the European colonial powers before it, has been unable to resist becoming entangled in the region's political conflicts. Driven by a desire to keep the vast oil reserves in hands friendly to the United States, a wish to keep out potential rivals (such as the Soviet Union), opposition to neutrality in the cold war, and domestic political considerations, the United States has compiled a record of tragedy in the Middle East. The most recent part of that record, which includes U.S. alliances with Iraq to counter Iran and then with Iran and Syria to counter Iraq, illustrates a theme that has been played in Washington for the last 45 years.

An examination of the details and consequences of that theme provides a startling object lesson in the pitfalls and conceit of an interventionist foreign policy. The two major components of the theme that are covered in this study are U.S. policy toward Iran and the relations between Israel and the Arabs. Events in which those components overlapped--development of the Carter Doctrine, the Iran-Iraq War, and the Persian Gulf War--will also be examined.

In the aftermath of the most overt and direct U.S. attempt to manage affairs in the Middle East, the Persian Gulf War, it is more important than ever to understand how the United States came to be involved in the region and the disastrous consequences of that involvement. President Bush's willingness to sacrifice American lives to remove Iraqi forces from Kuwait, to restore the "legitimate" government of that feudal monarchy, and to create a "new world order" proceeds logically from the premises and policies of past administrations. Indeed, there is little new in Bush's new world order, except the Soviet Union's assistance. That may mean the new order will be far more dangerous than the old, because it will feature an activist U.S. foreign policy without the inhibitions that were formerly imposed by the superpower rivalry. That bodes ill for the people of the Middle East, as well as for the long-suffering American citizens, who will see their taxes continue to rise, their consumer economy increasingly distorted by military spending, and their blood spilled--all in the name of U.S. leadership
...............................................

There's a little bit...fine, it wasn't Afghanistan but OBL wasn't even from Afghanistan, their feelings were that all muslims have been controlled and oppressed for too long.

I can't say enough that I believe the Taliban was evil, that what they did was wrong! I just find it frustrating to hear over and over again how innocent the U.S. is.

Charlie - posted on 05/02/2011

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Muavae ~

"instead of throwing him in the sea they should of set him on fire for the whole world to see, so he can die a slow painful death just like all the victims he frikn murderd. dumb arsehole glad that piece of shits gone anyways "

Yes he got what was coming to him , he was an evil man but your bloodlust towards him makes you just as bad as those who sought the blood of westerners , sorry .

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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Laura - since I missed that class - can you enlighten me on which Middle Eastern country the US was occupying exactly?

Nikkole - posted on 05/02/2011

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Im glad one more bad guy is gone from this world but that just means someone else will come this fighting will NEVER be over (which is sad) I WILL NOT rejoice Anyone's death even the most hated person on earth any death is sad and i think its sad that some American's act immature by dancing around and having rude comments on face book about his death! My close friend is Muslim she moved here from Jordan when she was 1 or 2 and since Osama's death people on face book have been bashing her religion and ALL Muslims like they are all the same and i find that VERY Ignorant and Offensive of those people who group all Muslims the same as a terrorist (not saying anyone on here has)!! So like i said im glad one less bad guy is gone but im not going to celebrate!

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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The US has been occupying the middle east for decades...and before that Russia was...and before that...it was somebody else.

In my terrorism class we learned that more and more wars are becoming hybrids (not really country against country but org against org or theology against theology)...if they want to claim their war was against capitalism, doesn't the world trade centre become a valid target?

What he did was awful! My BIL was supposed to have a meeting in one of the towers on that day! I truly DO understand the sadness and devastation that America felt that day...I just think that they also downplay the sadness and devastation that their country has caused elsewhere.

[deleted account]

I agree with Dana S,,I dont give 2 shits about him or his familys death. They were asking for it !

[deleted account]

instead of throwing him in the sea they should of set him on fire for the whole world to see, so he can die a slow painful death just like all the victims he frikn murderd. dumb arsehole glad that piece of shits gone anyways

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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@ Laura - The US wasn't fighting any country pre 9/11 so when OBL and friends came in to do their murdering it WAS a peaceful country. And last I checked nobody is being oppressed here either. Granted, the US is still working on becoming the perfection that is Canada, but they weren't quite Iraq or Afghanistan either.*eye roll*

[deleted account]

thats good that bastards dead. I just read the Herald here in New Zealand and they said he was thrown in to the sea. haha good job

Krista - posted on 05/02/2011

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Peaceful or not, Laura, it's indisputable that Bin Laden and Al-Quaeda targeted civilians. This particular operation targeted Bin Laden, and did not harm any innocents. So yes, there is a big difference between dancing in the streets celebrating the murder of innocent civilians, and dancing in the streets celebrating the murder of a murderer. Do I think it's really fitting to be dancing in the streets? Not really, but I didn't lose anybody to that man. So if someone who DID lose loved ones to Bin Laden wants to dance in the streets upon news of his death, then who am I to naysay them?

Isobel - posted on 05/02/2011

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Oh, I'm sorry...the IRA is a legitimate army and Al Quaeda is not...how, exactly did you make that decision?

I don't think everybody in the middle east would agree that Bin Laden "came to a peaceful country" and killed thousands...The fact that America does their fighting outside their back yard doesn't mean they are peaceful.

Charlie - posted on 05/02/2011

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Nanna always said " never post statuses about religion , sex or politics "

Ok she didnt but I should know that by now :0

Vegemite - posted on 05/02/2011

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Jennifer you can "lick my butt and suck on my balls!" bahaha
I'm sorry if that movie offends anyone but not really

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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Many also feel that Obama is a muslim born in Kenya and that Elvis has just left the building.

[deleted account]

Saudi arabia did not want his body.So the Americans throw his body in the Sea
Many still feel hes alive though.

Jenni - posted on 05/02/2011

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@Christine So I wasn't the only one thinking of Trey Parker and Matt Stone?

Vegemite - posted on 05/02/2011

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Thank you Laura and September
Davina did you mean Team American...F' yeah ;)
Esther I agree there should be a war crimes tribunal for Bush and his men.

Vegemite - posted on 05/02/2011

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"If English Military had've killed Gerry Adams, do you think it would've got more than 2 minutes air time here?"
The Irish Republican Army is not a terrorist group they are a Nation's army involved in a 500yr old war. England would say they are terrorists but the truth is England is responsible for more "terrorist" acts against Ireland as Eire is against England.

http://www.google.com.au/#q=history+of+t...,tll:1550,tlh:1599&prmd=ivnsb&ei=-w2_TbPZOY3evQPewp3HBQ&ved=0CCsQyQEoAQ&fp=c8f5903a6243ecc

September - posted on 05/02/2011

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This is the best comment I've come across all day about his death..."I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that"~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

[deleted account]

I should have phrased it better. Dancing in the streets is tacky. Being relieved and solemnly thanking those responsible IMO is not.

Esther - posted on 05/02/2011

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I don't think so Jen because we didn't randomly go into a peaceful country with the sole objective to kill several thousand civilians. Don't get me wrong - I think the invasion of Iraq was wrong, criminal even. I think Bush et al should be prosecuted for war crimes BUT no country was invaded until AFTER OBL came in and murdered all those civilians. And even when Iraq was invaded, the objective was never to kill innocent people. We knew it was inevitable, but that wasn't the objective and measures were taken to try to minimize civilian casualties. So those people celebrated the death of thousands of innocents. We celebrate the death of one horribly evil man. Slight difference.

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