Dealing With Lower Back Pain

Sarah - posted on 08/21/2009 ( 6 moms have responded )

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Just wondering if any of you have started to experience lower back pain, and what you are doing to help alleviate it. I suffered through my other 2 pregnancies, and now that I am starting to feel it come on, I want to try some different things to help. Any ideas?

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Amy - posted on 11/03/2009

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No problem! I'm glad I could help! I was reading further in the book, and found some variations on the pelvic rock that can be done a little easier throughout the day. It says that before bed, the hands and knees one is always most effective.

There's the Sitting Pelvic Rock:
1. Begin in a tailor sitting position. (Indian style, but with both ankles on the floor, and hands on your knees). Roll your pelvis back so that your weight shifts to the base of your spine. You feel as though you have been pushed in the abdomen.
2. Roll the pelvis forward again as far as it will go.
3. After repeating these motions about then times, stop when the pelvis is forward but relaxed.

Standing Pelvic Rock: This one is excellent for building strength in the back muscles and to maintain a good posture while standing.
1. Put your hands on your hips so that you can feel the pelvic bones.
2. Push your hips and abdomen forward and tailbone back and up (toward the ceiling).
3. Reverse. Tuck your tailbone under you and tighten your buttocks. The top of the pelvis has moved back, bringing the hipbones with them. Notice how your abdominal wall has tightened.
4. Repeat 2 and 3.

Kitchen Sink Pelvic Rock: The "kitchen sink" can be anything of the right height - a chair back at the office, the desktop in the schoolroom, a window ledge, bathroom sink, countertop, cupboard, dresser, etc. - wherever you are. Do it each time you go to that specific spot.
1. Stand straight about two feet away from the sink, with feet comfortably apart (about 6 inches). Distances will depend on your size.
2. Bow to the sink.
3. Put your hands on the edge of the counter, elbows stiff, and let your hands support your weight. In other words, lean against your hands.
4. Point your tailbone toward the ceiling. (it may hurt behind your knees, so go easy).
5. Tuck your tailbone down and under you, as you relax your knees. This rolls your hipbones backward as your spine gets a comfortable stretch.
6. Do 4 and 5 three times.
7. Now with your lower back rounded, your tailbone tucked under you, knees relaxed, and buttocks tight, straighten your shoulders and head up over the rest of your body. Be sure to keep the good posture that your have created in the lower part of your back.
8. Walk up to the counter and find that you can get four inches closer to it! Keep your knees relaxed and the same pelvic posture as you go on to other things.
9. Repeat each time you go to the sink. (or chair, or desk, etc.)

Sarah - posted on 11/03/2009

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Amy, thank you so much for taking the time to write that all down! I can't wait to try it out! As I have gotten further along, the pain doesn't seem so bad, but now with being on my feet at work,and as my belly gets bigger and bigger, I imagine that this is going to be a lifesaver!! Many Blessings to you and your new little one coming!

Amy - posted on 11/03/2009

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Boy, have I got help for you! :) I have an old book from the 70s called Exercises for True Natural Childbirth. I'm not exactly sure why it's called that because it's only exercises for while you're pregnant, but I guess maybe it's to get your body ready for childbirth? Anyhow, it has tons of exercises in it that prepare your muscles, and the most important one (in my opinion) is the Pelvic Rock (also called cat curls). I'll just type straight out of the book:

Standing erect causes the uterus, as it becomes heavier and heavier with pregnancy, to push lower and more tightly into the pelvis. This compresses the blood vessels and interferes with circulation to the uterus, legs, and kidneys. The heavy uterus also stretches supportive ligaments that are attached in the small of the back at roughly the same position as in four-footed mammals. The pressure and the weight cause the pregnant female to "give in" to the uterus, letting it fall forward and sway her back. Backache and "pressure" pains are the result. Pelvic rocking on hands and knees allows the uterus to fall forward, releasing the pressure in the pelvis and causing no discomfort in the spine because of the all-fours position... This is an exercise that strengthens muscles in your back and abdomen and therefore makes it easier to carry the baby in the uterus... Pelvic rocking strengthens abdominal muscles to support the uterus, and what a difference in the figure immediately postpartum - your tummy will look flatter than ever before!... Pelvic rocking will help prevent varicose veins by increasing circulation to pelvis and legs.... Pelvis rocking will definitely help relieve tensions and relax you in preparation for bed at night. (Do extra when you are "too tired to do any").
How: Get on the floor in an all-fours position, making sure that you form a box, with your knees and hips in a line and your wrists and shoulders also perpendicular to the floor. Knees may be comfortably apart.
1. Lower your abdomen toward the floor until you look like a "sway-back horse."
2. Lift your lower back until your back is parallel with the floor.
3. Tighten buttocks. This raises the back slightly and tightens the abdomen.
4. Slowly return to the sway-back first position with control.
5. Repeat movements 2-4.
When: Do as the last thing before you go to bed - that is very important. Do eighty before bed, with a rest in between. Do at intervals during the day. For example: midmorning, midafternoon, and early evening, forty each time, then eighty at bedtime, too. If this is your first pregnancy, you may not feel theneed of the daytime pelvic rocks until your uterus has grown big enough to make you aware of a bit of pressure. If you have already had a child, you'll want to pelvic rock all day long because it feels so good.



Ok, that was straight from the book. Essentially, you're swaying your back down (like the sway-back horse), then stretching it back up (like a frightened cat - think of the stereotypical halloween cat). Now, she says to do 80 before bed, and that is insane! I don't do nearly that many...I do about as many as I can before my arms get tired. And I don't generally do them throughout the day, unless my lower back starts hurting. But I can tell you, it's almost instant relief! After you do it for a couple of nights, you won't want to skip it because you can definitely tell the next day. This is my 2nd kid, and I can honestly tell you from experience, it works! :) Hope this helps!

Jacinta - posted on 11/02/2009

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im in the same boat, i find that my hot water bottle works wonders. dont worry, its safe for you and bub to have direct heat on your lower back, have done the research. hope this helps

Kearsty - posted on 10/28/2009

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im 23 weeks and have been coping with lower back pain for a while now... I have stood in the shower with the water pounding on my back while i rub it at the same time. What has helped me out the most though is having someone rub it for me... These things helped, but didnt make it go away. I had it pretty bad one day that it hurt to stand up or lay down. As weird as it is, the more i walked around and did things ( I was cleaning) the better it got!

Jessica - posted on 08/22/2009

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I'm sorry I can't really help with tips for alleviating, But I have to say I'm right along with you on the lower back pain. I'm only 13wks, but I'm in so much pain it hurts just laying down! Hope someone else can give us some tips!! Feel better soon mama

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