What age do kids star the times tables?

Virginia - posted on 09/24/2009 ( 26 moms have responded )

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My son is 7 and my mother in-law says he should know them now. I remember it being in the third grade but i'm not sure about that.

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Susan - posted on 01/28/2010

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I have homeschooled for 15 years and each year God teaches me something new. The most important thing I have learned is to take each child where they are and master one thing at a time. Don't try to keep up with the Jones so to speak. Use grade levels as a guage but don't let them master you. Remember why you chose to homeschool to begin with. There is no rush. Things will be reviewed again and again. Enjoy this time with your kids and the relationship with them. Two of mine are in college now and my last is a junior in high school. I only have this year and next with her. I wouldn't change one moment. When you start to stress, take a deep breath, make yourself a cup of tea, and remember why your doing what your doing. It will help put things back in perspective. Each child is unique and special. Each child will learn differently in their time. There is no hurry. Enjoy the adventure.

Tammy - posted on 06/23/2012

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I read a really good point in an article by the guy who puts out Math U See. When you're 20 does it really matter if you learned division when you were 8 or 12 as long as you learned it?

Delia Yvette - posted on 06/25/2013

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How did you get him to learn them ... My son is having trouble memorizing them..

Jasmine - posted on 01/14/2013

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My daughter is 12 and she still don't no her times tables and her time

Emily - posted on 03/09/2011

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I learned multiplication in public school when I was 8... it was the 3rd grade. However... that has absolutely no bearing on your home-schooled child. They start learning their times tables once they've mastered addition and subtraction, and they can understand the concept; and not before. This may be at age 6, or it may be at age 13. It depends on the child. My 6 year old is doing 4th grade work, but my 9 year old is only in 5th grade. It really makes no difference. In the end, your home-schooled child will know far more than his government-schooled counterparts. It's inevitable.

I had to deal with the whole "by this age, blah, blah, blah" thing with my own husband. By his account, our children were always behind... until one day they learned something he doesn't know himself. He hasn't said a word about it since. :)

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Sharlene - posted on 06/02/2014

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Hi, My name is Sharlene Goodwin and I am a teacher and a mother of 3 (12, 10 and 3).

I sympathize with you and your feelings about the school system. There are many great things about school but I do agree that there are points that are failing our children.

My daughter, Katia, has struggled with basic facts in maths. I looked to the school and they did not seem to have a way to address it. The way that maths is taught now is totally different than when you or I was at school.

Research (and common sense) shows that without a firm and strong foundation in maths (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) our children are set up for failure at High School. Children need to know there basic facts so well that they answer any times table or division question within 3 seconds- this leaves the brain free for harder maths.

I was frustrated that the school had no way to address this, so I have created my own answer! I produce daily 10-15 minute worksheets on the basic facts set at the level or the age of your child. I make them fun and I make them relevant to the way basic facts are taught at school.

It is such a relief to see my daughter learning the basics as we need these in everyday life. It makes me happy to see her confidence growing and her attitude of "I'm hopeless at math, so what's the point?" changing to "Hey I can do this"

You can sign up for a free trial at www.stayontrack.co.nz, if you like us we are only $6 a month. It was important to me as a parent to make this affordable for other parents.

I send a worksheet a day, Monday to Friday and it is to be worked on for 10-15 minutes. Longer if they are really enjoying it!

I am currently writing articles and sending 'Wednesday Wisdoms' addressing parents concern about maths, often as parents, we feel unsure in this subject.

Time for that to change, it is all about practice and repetition! If you want to be good at sports-what do you do? You Practice and maths is the same!

Sign up at www.stayontrack.co.nz and trial us for free as well as getting informative emails. I love what I do.

Sharlene

Julia - posted on 02/26/2013

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I learned my times tables in second grade. That was in private/ catholic school. My sons school does times tables in 3rd. He is in first grade now and math is his best subject. I am working on getting him put into the grade ahead for math next year so he isn't bored.

Queen - posted on 09/11/2012

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BOOOOO Monster in laws know everything! Listen to your sons teacher! now if your MIL is his teacher ur screwed! :)

Katie - posted on 02/17/2011

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I used the book First Lessons in Numbers , this book was from the late 1800's, for math and it does exactly what Tammy Foster said. Starts with counting , with Roman Numerals, into all the other subjects. He learned addition and subtraction at the same time and multiplication and division at the same time. By the end of the book we're doing fractions and problems with addition , subtraction, multiplication and division all in the same problem. I use a lot of old books for my homeschooling , most of them you can find for free on Project Gutenburg or 19th Century Schoolbooks. com. And we still have until June to finish his first grade year.

Tammy - posted on 02/15/2011

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I would just suggest not to base it on their age a much as on whether or not they have mastered the previous concepts. If they can add and subtract well and can do much of it in their head as possible and at an acceptable speed then you move on to the concept of multiplication. Teach the concepts and stratagies then practice until you achieve mastery...being able to do much of it mentally and at an acceptable speed. Then you add division, then fractions. This does not have to take many years. If you have ever seen a text book from the late 1700's early 1800's you would be floored. Anyone who thinks we're smarter today then back then is deluded.:) One book I saw took a child (probably age 6-8? range) from "we have 1 mouth, 2 eyes, etc, through division and fractions(?) in one year! Given the dedication of a couple of hours a day you can teach an entire math concept in one summer and I'm talking about the higher maths. I've heard it over and over again.

My best advice with hindsight added in..? Take a subjects scope and sequence and eliminate the age and grade level markers. Set a goal to focus on mastery and moving up when mastery of a skill level has occured.

Katie - posted on 02/15/2011

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I remember learning my times tables in the 3rd. grade but that was public school. I say let them go at their own pace. My son learned addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and is starting fractions, all in the first grade. He's a sponge . He has memorized all of the multiplication tables 1-12. And he can tell you what 1/6 of 24 is in about 3 seconds. Granted sometimes it takes him a few minutes but he is learning to do most of it in his head.

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I am not sure but I know he should be learning them no later than 4th grade. Depending on his learning level. My 7 yr old is already doing division and working on memorizing her times tables of course she is in the 3rd grade advanced math.

Tammy - posted on 01/02/2011

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I have finally begun to think in terms of skills mastered instead of grade level. If he has mastered the concepts of addition and subtraction then you can begin to introduce multiplication. First I would make sure that YOU understand the concept and decide how you will go about teaching him the concept. (no I'm not trying to make anyone sound silly) My daughter struggled with them but I also had a hard time explaining the concept. Because I was never taught the "concept". I was given a chart and told to memorize it. Totally different. Multiplication is a faster way to add Groups. You can start him off with a few things like skip counting. Tell hime that skip counting is actually the "answers" to the multiplication problem. Skip counting by 2's is the 2 times tables, skip counting by 3's is the 3 times tables, etc. Once he can skip count all the numbers fairly easily it goes fast from their. Then there are a few "rules" or "properites" that can be learned.



1) Everything multiplied by zero is zero

2) Everything multiplied by one is the same number

3) everything multiplied by 2 is double

4) The order propety: No matter how you place the numbers the product is still the same. 2x3=6 and 3x2=6



I have a big dry erase board of the times tables up to the tens with no answers. I showed my daughter how using these "rules" she actually already knows more than half of them.



With math it isn't about memorizing answers as much as it is knowing AND understanding the concepts so you can figure it out.

Tracey - posted on 02/02/2010

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I like the saying, "The curriculum serves me (and my family), I don't serve it." I have taught kids from infant through 6th grade; I taught 3 yr olds to read. However, since I've begun homeschooling, I've learned a lot about what 'we' as a society have accepted and forced on our children. Multiplication is a very abstract concept when you're talking 3x5=15, so we should wait until their little brains integrate enough to handle it (the two hemispheres begin to integrate about 7 and are usually fully integrated abou13). Using pictures, groups of toys, real life experiences (doubling or tripling a recipe), etc are real-life, concrete experiences that will build up to a mastery of the facts in a couple years. Third grade (depending on the child) seems to be a good time to introduce simple multiplication facts. Above all we want our children to succeed in this, so we must not force it before they are ready; in thier time, not society's, in-law's, or anyone else's (even our own).

FYI- I learned all mine in 3rd (public school). My daughter (gifted) started in 2nd (private school) but only mastered them in 5th (our first year of homeschooling).

Sky - posted on 01/29/2010

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My daughter just turned 8 in November. She's in second grade but just started third grade math at the beginning of January. She was first exposed to multiplication at the end of her second grade math book. We haven't worked on them since. If you're interested in helping him learn, try games. Even something like Yahtzee can be used to teach multiplication.

Dana - posted on 01/17/2010

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My son is 9 and doesn't know them yet because he isn't ready. He's mastered addition but still struggling with subtraction a bit. I project that later this year we will start multiplication (he just turned 9 in Dec). I'd say depending upon your child's development he should learn anytime between 8yrs-10yrs. This is the 2nd-4th grade range. I had a step-daughter in a previous relationship who was public schooled, in the 5th grade, age 10 and still did not know her multiplication, not for lack of trying to teach her. She just was not ready to learn them and could not comprehend until she was.

Dorothy - posted on 12/13/2009

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First of all your your child's educator. There is a huge push going on in the PS to teach concepts that are developmentally inapproipiate. Adults think this is so wonderful and challenging. When in reality all that is happening is the adult is being challegned. You are right, normally addition and subtraction are introduced first with skip counting. If they learn how to skip count multiplying will become a snap at the appropriate time. You can't skip around in Mathmatics. It is a logical, progressive building process that occurs. You should never teach algebra, calculus, geomentry before the brain has developed into the logic and rhetoric stages. It is also true of the basics foundational skills. Good luck!

Linda - posted on 12/12/2009

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I worried a lot about the times tables and I still do, however I'm learning to relax a little! My son is in fifth grade and has struggled learning his times tables. He picks up math very fast, especially geometry but he worries about not be able to memorize the times tables so he has developed some sort of block I think. Last night he was sitting with my daughter who is a senior in college helping her do her college math class, using her scientific calculator and getting all the right answers....okay, I need to relax. He's a perfectionist....great reader, fantastic speller, and is able to understand college math ideas.....yes, times tables are important and we will continue to work on them...but, I'm not going to lose sleep over it, that's for sure.... As for the "right time" according to public school...it's usually third grade.

Stacey - posted on 10/28/2009

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2nd into 3rd, and don't stress about the MIL. I swear the MIL's are always saying "they should know that by now, tsk!tsk!" My son is 7 as well and we started with easy one's this year (2nd grade) such as the 0 times 0 and up to 5, and the 1 and 2 times up to 5. He is mastering that and once they get the concept of multiples they are good. I just do 10 problems with him a day, and the double digit addition and subtraction (no carrying yet, that's later.)

Towana - posted on 10/07/2009

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When they have mastered addition and subtraction. Doesnt matter the age, what matters is the understanding.

Virginia - posted on 09/25/2009

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I know and I usually ignore it but since i was unsure i wanted to find out the truth. For my son, you know.

Virginia - posted on 09/25/2009

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Thank you. I thought it was the third grade but now i see he should start them next year.

Amy - posted on 09/25/2009

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We need to learn to ignore our parents. I realized this after our first year of homeschool. They truly don't have a clue.

Amy - posted on 09/25/2009

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My ten year old started in second grade. I now have a second grader and we will start soon. Multiplication games we have just ordered state ages 8 & up. They are for kids just starting. My ten year old was in third grade last year and still struggled with half of the times table. We will be reviewing again this year in fourth grade. (He has an above average IQ, just a lack of interest.)

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