Is it ok to go to formula now he has teeth??

Emma - posted on 01/01/2010 ( 6 moms have responded )

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I have breast feed my six and a half month old exclusively up until a few weeks ago. He has three teeth and thinks it's funny to bite!! He drinks formula with no problems, in fact he seems to spit up less when drinking formula.

I know that you are meant to try to breastfeed for a year but im exhausted all the time and my nipples are killing me?

Does any one else have this problem??

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Anita - posted on 01/03/2010

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Hi Emma, good on you for breastfeeding for that long, I envy mums like you who can breastfeed, I wasn't able to, its' harder than you think.
My 2 babies are both on formula and they are both healthy. They haven't been sick yet, and are 6 months and 16 months. Good luck with everything.,

Ashley - posted on 01/03/2010

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AAP RELEASES REVISED BREASTFEEDING RECOMMENDATIONS



Below is a news release on a policy statement appearing in the the February issue of Pediatrics, the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

For Release: February 7, 2005, 12:01 am (ET)

CHICAGO - A long-time advocate of breastfeeding, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is issuing a revised policy statement on "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk" to replace its existing policy developed in 1997. The new recommendations reflect new research on the importance of breastfeeding.

Studies on infants provide evidence that breastfeeding can decrease the incidence or severity of conditions such as diarrhea, ear infections and bacterial meningitis. Some studies also suggest that breastfeeding may offer protection against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), diabetes, obesity and asthma among others.

Research indicates that breastfeeding can reduce a mother's risk of several medical conditions, including ovarian and breast cancer, and possibly a decreased risk of hip fractures and osteoporosis in the postmenopausal period. Increased breastfeeding also has the potential for decreasing annual health costs in the U.S. by $3.6 billion and decreasing parental employee absenteeism, the environmental burden for disposal of formula cans and bottles, and energy demands for production and transport of formula.

Although breastfeeding initiation rates have increased steadily since 1990, exclusive (no water, juice, nonhuman milk or food) breastfeeding rates have shown little or no increase over the same period of time. Similarly, the proportion of infants who are exclusively breastfed until about six months of age has increased at a much slower rate than that of infants who received mixed feedings (breast milk plus infant formula).

The policy recommendations include:

* Exclusive breastfeeding for approximately the first six months and support for breastfeeding for the first year and beyond as long as mutually desired by mother and child.
* Mother and infant should sleep in proximity to each other to facilitate breastfeeding;
* Self-examination of mother's breasts for lumps is recommended throughout lactation, not just after weaning;
* Support efforts of parents and the courts to ensure continuation of breastfeeding in cases of separation, custody and visitation;
* Pediatricians should counsel adoptive mothers on the benefits of induced lactation through hormonal therapy or mechanical stimulation.
* Recognize and work with cultural diversity in breastfeeding practices
* A pediatrician or other knowledgeable and experienced health care professional should evaluate a newborn breastfed infant at 3 to 5 days of age and again at 2 to 3 weeks of age to be sure the infant is feeding and growing well.

The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults.


I don't care for WHO or Health Canada... Do your research and pick one that is best for you. I prefer the AAP guidelines myself. My belief is that if my child can walk over to my breast for a meal, it's time to quit;) LOL! Really... Do whatever you feel is right for you!

Anna - posted on 01/03/2010

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Health Canada recommends: •Nutrient-rich complementary foods, with particular attention to iron, should be introduced at six months of age (approximately 180 days), with continued breastfeeding for up to two years and beyond.

World Health Organization
“ The vast majority of mothers can and should breastfeed, just as the vast majority of infants can and should be breastfed. Only under exceptional circumstances can a mother’s milk be considered unsuitable for her infant. For those few health situations where infants cannot, or should not, be breastfed, the choice of the best alternative – expressed breast milk from an infant’s own mother, breast milk from a healthy wet-nurse or a human-milk bank, or a breast-milk substitute fed with a cup, which is a safer method than a feeding bottle and teat – depends on individual circumstances.[7] ”

The WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life, after which "infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond."[7]

American Academy of Pediatrics
“ Extensive research using improved epidemiologic methods and modern laboratory techniques documents diverse and compelling advantages for infants, mothers, families, and society from breastfeeding and use of human milk for infant feeding. These advantages include health, nutritional, immunologic, developmental, psychologic, social, economic, and environmental benefits.[8] ”

The AAP recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life.[8] Furthermore, "breastfeeding should be continued for at least the first year of life and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child."[8]

WHO and Health Canada both recommend 2 years.

Ashley - posted on 01/03/2010

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends one year! But, I'm about done at 7 months... I have a biter too! You've done well... Hope your transition is easier than mine:)

Anna - posted on 01/03/2010

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When DS bites me, I pull him off the boob and tell him, "no" and that ends the feeding. He doesn't bite me very often. Also, sometimes pushing his face into my boob helps. I know it's the exact opposite of instinct because you want to pull away, but it gets him to let go.
It's now reccommended to breastfeed for 2 years, and thereafter as long as both mom and baby want to continue.

April - posted on 01/01/2010

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well my 6month old daughter is teething, but hasnt gotten any teeth yet, but I have also been exclusively breastfeeding since she was born, recently I have slowly been transitioning her over to formula and believe me I know how exhausting it can be, I feel you should do whatever is best for you and your baby, those 6months of breastfeeding will still benefit your baby in the future regardless

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