Birth Control at 12?

Lori - posted on 03/26/2010 ( 33 moms have responded )

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My 12 year old daughter came to me recently about birth control to "regulate her periods and help her with acne." Not 100% concerned about the boys yet but I also know that will be coming soon. She's not the best with personal hygiene. My husband and I haven't 100% made our decision yet. Her periods are monthly but she's having a difficult time writing down when her period is starting and stopping. We've got several concerns about this but haven't ruled the idea out completely either. We do NOT want to think of birth control as a "miricle pill". We've decided not to make final decision for minimal of six months. In the meantime, we plan on beginning her on a multi vitamin to see if she's responsible enough to take it on a daily basis. We've decided to work with her on tracking her period so she has an approximate date of when her period is going to start next. We've also decided it's time to start discussing basic need to know's such as how to prevent STD's and pregnancy. We're going to also keep an eye on her personal hygiene and use the birth control as sort of an encouragement for her to take better care of herself. My husband and I have decided that how she does over the next six months will determine which form of birth control we will utilize. If she can not take the multi vitamin at the same time each day for six months and her personal hygiene does not improve then we will will look at something like depo prevera. If she is able to take the multi vitamin and her personal hygiene improves then we will consider the birth control pill. In six months time, she will be a little bit older, might start having more interest in boys and regardless it will be time for further discussion. But to be honest with everyone, I'm petrified. I figure if she's asking there's a REASON she's asking. Maybe not necissarily for the boys but in six months time peer pressure and the boys and all of that really begins. Are we making the right decision?

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Melissa - posted on 03/27/2010

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this is a tricky one.. one i am petrified of facing up to myself in the future. i think you should trust your instincts. sounds like your doing everything right to educate her on the facts of life. it would be nice to think we can protect our daughters innocence until they are a appropriate age but these days girls are getting younger and younger sadly. i think although it probably does sound extreme.. if she has asked you i would seriously consider putting her on the pill, better to be safe than sorry. just make sure she knows that once she is sexually active that the pill doesnt protect from std etc.

Shannon - posted on 04/06/2010

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Lori - Definately sit down and talk with her whithout daddy first! The Daddy's tend to skew the situation without even trying! Find out if those are her only reasons because at her age there is a real good chance she is not regular yet. My daughter is 13 and has been having hers for about a year now and we do keep track of hers (just we know when we need to go shopping!) and she still isn't all that regular. She also has the acne issue but a lot of that is the age and the changes she is going through as well. Have her see a dermatologist first and get topical treatments to try first.

I did have to start taking the pill at a young age myself and I am soooo glad my daughter is not like me in this. I had such pains that I was physically ill 2 to 3 days every month and boy was it a HEAVY flow. After missing so much school the nurse at school talked to my mother about putting me on it for that reason. The biggest problem I have had with being on the pill for most of the last 15 years is that you do have to switch them up from time to time because over time they can become ineffective for birth control ( my oldest is in that 1% when it don't work!).

If you do choos to start her on them they do make low dose pills which are better for young teens since they do not have the higher hormone concentrations.

Whatever you do choose good luck to you!

Jennifer - posted on 04/01/2010

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My cousin was 13 years old when she asked her mom the same thing. She thought this was the easier way to get on the pill. Her mom freaked and refused to let her get on the pill, she didn't want to make it easy for her to have sex. I am now a mother of 3 girls ages 11,12, and 13. I understand her position and don't want my children to evening be thinking of sex at this age, but realistically they are.My cousin was pregnant 2 months later. Maybe she is asking for the right reasons but whatever the reason you don't want to take any chances. Talk to her about the risks and the advantages and then take her to her peditrician and see what they say. I don't want any of my girls on the pill at their age but I also don't want to be helping her raise a baby. Good luck.

Shannon - posted on 04/07/2010

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We decided to put our daughter on the pill for this same reason. As a Teen Mother myself, there were so many girls at my special school for Teen Parents that had 1 year old babies and were only 13 years old, so the possibility is definitely there. The regularity of it and the responsibility helped our daughter. She seemed happy we trusted her to take it on her own. She is 18 now and still claims to be a virgin (taken the abstinence til marriage oath), but we were much more comforted knowing she had this protection in the event she did decide to become active.

Beth - posted on 04/07/2010

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I think you are doing the right thing by discussing options, educating and improving on personal habits. You also have to consider her young age in other ways, at 12 she is just starting and very much still developing, in six months time the issues she raised may not even be a problem. My daughter at 14 was unequally developed and was upset, six months later it was no longer an issue. Also, birth control is not without risk itself! The pill has some very major side effects, and I have seen some very young women's lives changed because of things like blood clots attributed to them. It is becoming more common! Please check with your health care providers, they should give you some help. Keeping communication open with your daughter is the key in knowing what to do.

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Lori - posted on 04/12/2010

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I just wanted to take some time out and really thank everyone for their support. I can honestly say that everyone's advice, views and input have trully helped. I can also honestly say that I have to 100% agree with everyone and their points of view regarding this subject. When I first posted this subject I almost expected to have to close out the conversation because of different opinions and conflict. If I've seen it happen once here I've seen it happen a thousand times where conversations have become too heated to continue when it comes to very difficult decisions. I'd like to thank every single parent here for not turning it into a whirlwind debate.



To give you all an update on how things are going. After long and cautious thinking regarding the situation at hand. We've made the decision that now is just simply not the time. Come to find out through further discussion she got the idea from an older sibling on the other side of things. We know eventually that this topic will definately be up for discussion again soon and we're not trying to fight the enevitable. In the meantime, we've all started working more closely regarding personal and femine hygiene and also seeing a great deal of improvement. We've also discussed with our daughter the risks of birth control.



On that note, I'm going to go ahead and close this conversation out on a happy note. But again, thank you. *Take Care & God Bless*

Geri - posted on 04/06/2010

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I have read alot of your replies on this subject...and you can talk to your kids and teach them till you are outta breath but ultimately it is their call...you can not be there 24/7 to protect them every second. And yeah you can HOPE they make the right decisions..but if they believe they are in love and they have "you" (there parent(s)) in one corner saying "NO" and the boy they claim to love (along with raging hormones) in the other giving her time and attention...which do you think she is gonna choose??? My hats off to you..Laurie...for asking for comments and advice on this from parents that have gone down this road...my daughter is 11...she will be 12 in may..and she has not started YET...but if she ever comes to me and tells me she is interested in taking the pill...guess what I am going to do??? I have already had the talk with her and continue to talk with her and ask and answer questions...but the bottom line is...if they want to have sex...lol..they are going to!!! Look at todays society...lol...and the public school system...hmmmm...wow...thats a concept..since the GOVERNMENT has control over that ....

Laurie...I had an irregular period...for all of my teen yrs...and I tried the pill for 3 yrs..it did not help...but what did help was when I gave birth at 26 yrs old to my 3rd child..and I am ok now...my periods are normal. Good Luck..and God Bless!!!

Ann - posted on 04/06/2010

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No judgments here, but I know I wouldn't have even considered it when my daughter was 12. Why does she care about regulating her periods? I would wonder if there are other reasons she is asking for it. Acne can be controlled in other ways. This is just my opinion, but I would say no. Good luck on your decision.

Kenitra - posted on 04/06/2010

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My opinion, putting them on birth control is like saying it is okay to have sex, If she truly just wants to regulate her periods, get active in exercise and sports. If she truely wants to control her acne, eat right. But if her hidden desires are to have sex, and discouraging her doesn't work, yes, put her on the pill. She has to be up front and honest with you. Oh, by the way, no depo shot. Although have no periods sounds wonderful, you can still get pregnant, and on depo, you wouldn't know it right away because you do not have periods to keep track of. The only form of birth control that is 100% is abstinance.

NJ - posted on 04/01/2010

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I think you are very lucky to have your child come to you for help! I know you are doing what is best for her and your family, with all information and medical issues covered. Fascinating what others have to say on the subject! I like your response as to encouraging her to keep track of her periods and spend a bit more time on hygiene. My daughter's fifth grade teacher encouraged her young charges to begin wearing deodorant! Personal hygiene lagged a bit, but she has become fastidious in the past few years (now 16).

Charlotte - posted on 04/01/2010

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You are lucky parents to have a daughter who trusts you to straight forwardly ask for birth control even if she only asks for the sake of regulating her periods. Even though she may not be emotional prepared and ready for sex as yet, her body is preparing, and new inclinations follow naturally. Nature talks … and we should listen to her. My daughter is 12 years old, and she is already on birth control. There are two reasons:

First - it regulates her menstruation. Condoms are not solution in this issue.

Secondly - around here, at least, many 13 years old girls are being sexual active already, and some debut sexually as young as eleven years old. My daughter's friend, at the same age, is having regular sex with her boyfriend already. All this could happen with my daughter(s), and I am not taking chance on the talk alone. We can be shocked of their youthful sex life and rebuff the contemporary social reality by supposing something else of our daughters, but too many parents has ruined the life of their daughter in refusing the apparent modern approach in dealing with reality of today. My children are informed of the nature of sex, not only from the perspective of STIs, but know that sex is important celebration of life, and that they therefore should act from consideration of quality, not give in to curiosity alone with a 'random partner'. It is my experience that positive talk about sex has its own constructive, preventive effect because candidness allows the young ones to become more mental mature about the nature of their body. Then the child feels taken care of and honored as biological being, and find itself more psychological at ease in respecting advisement. I do not think that offering my daughter birth control push her faster into 'adult love' than it would natural ensue, but my positive frankness about sex's spiritual worth will surely account for a positive preventative effect, however, at least in choosing partners more wisely (a big step in itself for a lot of young people). And when she decide to be 'adult enough', I would know as a responsible mother that I have done my part in all of what any modern mother can do to prevent her young daughter from getting pregnant without having harmed her sexual self-worth in the process (as many parents actually do by negative preventative talks about sex), as the trend shows that more and more girls are still children when initiated into the world of 'adult love'.

I am not saying that your daughter is necessity into boys and sex right now even though she has bravely stepped forward and asked for her birth control, but you really do not know. If she is getting pregnant, you as parents could be held legally liable in your state, as you know (therefore better she is on prevention, at least). If she feels inclination or having thoughts about trying out some aspect of sex or has decided to become sexual active with someone, to wait as long as 6 month before giving her birth control could be risky parenting. However, I understand that you need some time in deciding which type of birth control you would offer her by the effect of the outcome in monitoring her behavior in discipline and cleanliness. I hope she will prove herself 'adult' enough for the pill by the time she is thirteen years old, though. The pill does the job on all accounts as most suitable for a young girl as your daughter.

Some words of advice about her lack of intimate hygiene. Having little to none pubic hair is always the most hygienic solution, especially if the girl demonstrate problem with hygiene. My daughter and even my son shave their sexes hairless, and having me as a role model (we are pretty much nudists on the beach and at ease with causal nudity at home, so it is impossible to hide from them the fact that I am as hairless as my youngest daughter). To shave pubic hair is not a new phenomenon, but was common in the higher classes before the Victorian epoch, as the Crusaders brought this hygienic practice to Europe from the Muslim world, and being smooth was yet an older tradition in Egypt, Greece and Rome, as a signalization of cultivation and high social position even in young people. It is an honorable tradition, and many thousand years older than porn. You mention that your daughter has hygienic problems with her sex, and it seems to me that she therefore is in serious need to begin shaving her pubic hair. Blood and hair is not easy combination to handle, and being hairless solves this practical problem in staying odorless, also of sweat and vaginal discharge. You know the mess ...

You say you want to offer her birth control as 'sort of an encouragement for her to take better care of herself', and that is great, but you could introduce her to intimate shaving in that regard as well. When she begins to shave or wax her sex, she would be more obliged to pay her sex organ attention, as in hygienic consideration, more regularly and habitually by having to keep herself systematically smooth (or in design). Being hairless brings the whole of her vagina to the forefront, so to speak, and as a natural consequence of being 'exposed to the elements' and not forgotten back a forest of hair, she will feel more obligated to stay clean, neat and fresh. Taking care of her sex to stay shiny instills in her a sense of bodily cyclic responsibility as a framework in being more adept in taking note of her periods as well. Because she have to shave often, it is easier for her to follow a decided program that she can monitor on paper and fusing this practice with taking notes of her periods, all in a dedicated 'intimate dairy'. Offer her the right equipments that she needs to stay smooth and shiny along with this intimate dairy monitoring her work. This should do the trick. My daughter takes note of all of her intimate doings and periods, monitoring what products and technique which works best for her, but she is doing all this in her ordinary dairy because she has no problem to handle her body in regard to her sexual progress and maturity. If your daughter needs help, assist her in establishing a sound scheme for her to follow and tell her that it is vital for her to cooperate because the pill is in reality not a child's play, and that she has to display an 'adult capability' if she is to be given her birth control. Safety comes with proper exercise and use, or birth control will in the end only provide her a false sense of protection. Tell her that when she asks for adult issues, she has to behave 'adult' as far as to her age – only then she would be trusted with 'adult' solutions.

Best of luck …

Crystal - posted on 04/01/2010

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It may help if you were to try and notice when her monthly starts that way you can see just how iregular it is. I clearly remeber when i frist started mine, for the frist year or so it wasnt on a set schedule. If you and your husband feels it is to early to start birth control then by all means DON'T. If you do decide to palce her on them make sure to keep an eye on her birth control can mean more problems for some young ladies. Such as myself. I was placed on them at a young age and they casued me more problems than helping. I hope this helps and good luck let me know how all truns out.

Cassandra - posted on 03/31/2010

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Not saying this is the case but I started having sex at 12 and got pregnant a month before my 14th birthday. Maybe she is thinking about sex but doesn't know how to broach the subject with you. Maybe she is just worried about regulation and acne. My daughter is almost 11 and her older friends have either started having sex or are thinking and talking about it. I am the "cool" mom so they talk to me about it, hopefully when my oldest starts getting curious I will still be "cool". Sex is not a play or pretend, it is a choice that you can't will or wish back. Make sure your daughter is informed and smart about it before the BC, stds suck, some you can get rid of, some are forever. On the swing side a baby is forever and the alternitives are hard to deal with at any age. I know!

Amy - posted on 03/31/2010

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I have a daughter that is about to turn 9. She has recently started asking the hard questions. (how are babies born, what is a period and things like that). I was very hesitant about having "the talk" with her and told her I would explain it all when she was older. She was very insistant that if it was something that was going to happen to her, she wanted to know. I finally relented and gave her a rated G version of the birds and bees talk. I found that she was more secure in herself after I did.



The fact that your daughter has come to you should speak volumes. She may be looking for help with her period and acne. Often, we find that our kids will ask things for friends when the friend does not feel comfortable asking her parents. I also think that you should deffinately be having the talk about STDs. I also have a son that is 13. It is amazing what gets said and done at school. As a mother, i would rather my kids get accurate info from me or their dad than learn it all at school. The most important thing to stress to your daughter is that if you put her on birth control you are not giving her permission to have sex. And that birth control is not 100% effective in preventing pregnancy or STDs. I don't envy you at this point. I dread when my daughter is old enough for this conversation. Good luck. It sounds like you are doing a good job of trying to cover all your bases. Just remember, if she is asking about birth control, six months from now may be too late.



It is hard to raise kids these days. There are soooooo many outside influences. We have to do the best we can and hope that when the time comes for our kids to make the tough decisions, they make the right ones. You have already passed the first test. Your daughter came to you and started asking questions. Is she younger than you would like for these conversations to start? probably so, but at least she knows that she can come to you. I had a class mate in the sixth grade that had a baby. We were all shocked. It is not that uncommon any more. I think that she is the right age to start looking into things. Good luck. You have a great support group. Let us know what you decide. I for one have a daughter coming up behind yours. Any info you get could help us all.

Chris - posted on 03/31/2010

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My 13 daughter & I are close, but I think at the age of 12 or 13 they are too young to be on the pill due to side effects. My daughter does take medication daily and is pretty good about it, but DON'T FORGET at that age and peer pressure the risks of her becoming sexually active are more if she's on the pill & thinks of it as a pregnancy preventative. Truthfully there are more things out there for acne that aren't as exterme my daughters pediatrician recommends an antibiotic cream then antibiotic pill.And as for her periods just keep track of them for a while, she's still young and developing so they could regulate out in a year or two. Weigh all options and talk to her more about the pill and emphazise the risks of "the pill"

Monica - posted on 03/31/2010

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You'd be shocked at what some of these 12 yr olds talk about..and do! If she's not doing the talking, everyone around her definately is and I am sure she is getting the idea. I have a 15 yr old boy and if it was possible for me to get him on bc at 12 I would have done so already! Most every girl he has talked to is no longer a virgin and it makes me sad. One of his friends even told me the other day that she is "abstinate now"...like she was some kind of pro before, taking some time off, retiring at 14! I dont trust these kids to make very good adult decisions and dont feel that they should have to pay for their bad decisions for the rest of their life. I think if your daughter is asking for birth control she is probably thinking about making a major life decision and needs to be protected. I'd talk to your gyn about the safest method for her, and if pills are a problem as they were for me when i was a teen, there are other options for that also. I had my son at 16 strictly because I was too scatter brained and immature to remember to take a pill daily. Makes it even more scary that I was then entrusted with a tiny human life! I would not put anything past any of these kids today. You definately did the right thing, being open with her and discussing the reasons and precautions. Good luck.

Lori - posted on 03/30/2010

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I'm glad someone finally decided to ask me the right question here. My daughter currently thinks of her periods as "irregular" because she's not doing what I taught her to do from the get go which is mark discreately on the calender when her peroid begins and ends. So instead of having an accurate date of when her period is going to begin she's got the week it's going to start down but not an approximate date. She needs to understand that just because she's not tracking her periods the way that she needs to be and therefore has no idea when it's going to start does not make her "irregular". Furthermore, as I've stated, her personal hygiene is not only a problem here but is also a problem at her biomom's house. You can provide all of the shampoo, conditioner, soap, deoderant and acne treatment there is avaiable, stay on them to use them and to care for themselves properly but if they can't even do that on a regular basis then it's again a show of severe immaturity and a sign that she's not ready. Personal hygiene is being discussed in BOTH of her homes by all FOUR of her parents. My daughter is seeing birth control as a "miricle pill" and that's just simply NOT the case. She needs to understand that these things are important and need to be taken care of more seriously. We have an entire six months to make a final decision and to see if we can get some of these responsibilities improved. I would just simply like to know what is avaiable out there for when the time comes for when she is ready. Are we freaking out? Absolutely. But she's growing up on us. We don't want to shut her down completely on the subject in fear that she won't bring it to our attention again before she becomes sexually active but there are absolutely things that need to be addressed before any birth control measures are taken. At first I thought the same. How insane is this that we're discussing birth control at 12 years old but I'd rather her bring them to our attention, make it open for discussion, than to make the crucial mistake of ignoring the situation altogether.

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For any parent out there who's daughter is simply wanting hormones to regulate her cycle and help with acne, please look into natural hormone therapy. You don't have to take the "pill" to help regulate your hormones. And, you don't need to use synthetic hormones, you can request natural hormones. These are plant based, not chemical based. I know this because I have been on these for years. I am estrogen dominant and had endrometriosis. My OBGYN writes the prescription. Now, if she is wanting birth control, that is another story...

Sherri - posted on 03/30/2010

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This is a very hard subject. My daughter just turned 12, and my stepdaughter 14, They are starting to ask about birth control and I and their Dad are trying to figure out the best course of action. We feel that they are way to young, But at least they are starting to ask about it. Their hormones are really kicking in, we have picked up their cell phones to see what they have been texting boyfriends, my stepdaughter is talking to her boyfriend about being "horny" uh oh...it was scarey finding out that that is what they are thinking about so young. I really think we need to discuss more about the possible outcomes with them while they are bringing up the subject, there is still so much they don't understand at that age. We also have a boy whom is 13, and he is not so much interested in girls at this point. But we do want to discuss the circumstances that he could get himself into if he decides to ever have sex and get a girl pregnant...It still causes so many problems for boys...We have to talk to our sons as much as we do our daughters. I have one friend that her son got his girlfriend pregnant, no he is so young, without a job, having to pay child support, and the girls family refuses to let the grandparents our him have visititation, so they are having to hire an attorney, and it is very expensive, and heartbreaking for them to go through......

Heather - posted on 03/30/2010

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That is a scary one. How did she get the idea to use it to "regulate her period and help with acne"? I think the schools are starting to put a little bit of pressure on the kids (girls especially) these days. At 12 years old, I knew nothing about what was going on with the period thing. I certainly didnt know or understand at 12, about using birth control to help with my period and acne!! I would be very curious to find out who she is talking to about this, and find out what all they have told her. The peer pressure may already have started. I have a son, and my fiance has a daughter. She is 14 (15 in October). I was worried about her at first, but she is very backward, and VERY un-interested in boys. She is very immature for her age, and therefore, very innocent.

Lori - posted on 03/30/2010

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Since my last post I've gone through several different sources. As my previous post stated we're not acting immediately on anything. I have to absolutely agree with a lot of you on the subject matter. First of all, my husband and I do not find it 100% appropriate to put her on birth control at age 12, we agree that it's too young and she is not responsible enough. As I previously stated her personal hygeine needs quite a bit of work, STD's and pregnancy are absolutely concerns of ours, un-needed hormones to her body are absolutely another concern. As Dena stated, one missed dose can extremely devastating consequinces in which Dana, my heart goes out to you. But folks, before you go too critical, after checking other sources including child services there's something that you should all know. A child who becomes sexually active and becomes pregnant before the age of 14, the parents can be held legally liable in the state in which I reside. This includes parents who know their child is sexually active and do nothing to try to absolutely nothing about it. This includes failure to provide birth control. Discussion is regarding sex, pregnancy, and STD's are ABSOLUTELY going to be addressed and the average age for girls now a days to begin a birth control regiment is 13 years old in which in six months time, my daughter will be 13 years old. So is it REALLY all that unusual that a 12 year old would bring such concerns to me now? Given the statistics and other things involved not really. There are several websites and books that address ALL of these issues including www.iwannaknow.org The post was intended not only to ask how other parents felt in the situation given her age but also to find out when the time comes what could or quite possiblly be available and what might be the best option for my daughter when she's ready. I no longer have the ability to have children and much has changed with birth control since then. Sometimes talking is enough, sometimes it is not. I can tell you that I have two other children. Ages 13 and 16. Both boys. My 16 yr old is not sexually active. I look at the subjects posted here objectively. So having the morals and values questioned here is 100% inappropriate and do not appreciate the way that some have immediately jumped into conclusions that my daughter is not being taught those specific things. And for those who have posted such comments, perhaps you outta read the post again. For those who have given useful information and spoken on a more even keel, thank you for your support.

Erin - posted on 03/29/2010

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if she is having acne problems, look into acne meds. if she is having trouble with her periods it could be because she hasn't had them long enough to be regular which means the pill wouldn't work as well as it should. she does not need birth control at 12, that is giving her a free ticket to have sex at 12. have the birds and the bees talk, lay out your expectations from a moral stand point and reiterate that you love and she should continue to come to you when she needs something.

Rose - posted on 03/29/2010

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should a child at rhe age of 12 be put on birth control ? This is really a question you should ask her peds. I would say only if there is a medicale factor. like is she having cycle problems.
to do so for any other reason is like saying it's ok to have sex. For when you do but say don't thats duble talk. Be direct, teach her right and wrong and what causes population in teens. tell her you love her always but teach her morals. thats the right way.
and yes I have 3 girls and 4 boys so I do have a little insight into this subject.
But a big brother hanging around is better then a whole case of pills.

DANA - posted on 03/29/2010

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YOU ARE RIGHT THSI IS A TRICKY ONE . IF THEY ARE STARTED THEN FORTHOSE REASON BY THE TIME EHE NEEDS THEM FOR THE OTHER REASONS SHE WILL BE GOOD AND ESTABLISHED WITH THEM AND THEY WILL BE A BETTER PART OF HER ROUTINE. I HAAVE A 16 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER THAT STARTED TAKING THEM AND WAS IN THE ROUTINE SO MISSED A FEW HERE AND THERE AND........ SHE IS 3 MONTHS PREGNANT. HAVE YOU TALKED TO A DRABOUT ANY REASONS NOT TO START HER NOW?

Melissa - posted on 03/29/2010

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ive actually used Implanon myself and i think its great! its a small rod about an inch and half long and probably half a cm thick that is inserted into the upper arm at your regular gp and it protects from pregnancy for 3 years. the only downside to implanon is it causes periods to become very irregular, if you get any at all.

Glenda - posted on 03/28/2010

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Wow, Im so glad I have boys, so many things going on here. First of all she is way too young to even be discussing birth control, I think she is still so young. Is she having problems with her period? you seemed so concerned about the start dates? Im a little confused, but I would sit down with her, just you and her first without dad, and have a discussion about the importance of waiting, and not giving into peer presure! I wouldnt just assume its bound to happen so whatever. I would let her know that you think sex is out of the question for quite a while. Society pushes kids into adulthood way too soon, and she needs you to take a stand and let her know she is in control of her body, and she doesnt have to have sex, its okay to say no, and enjoy being a child, which she very much is. good luck, glenda

Debbie - posted on 03/28/2010

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oh also if you go on the CDC website, it will give you a lot of inform. about STD's

Debbie - posted on 03/28/2010

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No the norplant is not still around, but there is a device called implanon, same kind of idea goes in the upper arm, I dont know a lot of info on that because there is only one Dr in our practice that does them and its not the one I work for:) Good glad that information could help you or a least give you some options to investigate and then discuss with your doctor when ready.

GAYLE - posted on 03/28/2010

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My daughter is now 16 but has had period problems since she started about 2.5 yrs ago.
I put her on the pill to regulate her periods when she was 15 & she is still having problems with her periods & also mood swings. The doc has just changed her pill and we are hoping that she will be ok. The problem with the pill is the fact that some women just are not able to take it as their body rejects the hormones in the pill. I would have a word with the doc and see what they think. I would give your daughter a lot of credit for being so grown up about the pill but like the other ladies on here have stated, you really must talk to your daughter about STD's and other things like that. I am sure she will understand what your concerns are and you will work out what is best for her. Good Luck.

Lori - posted on 03/28/2010

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I will not consider nuva ring nor an IUD at her age. Those options are more for woman who are married who only have 1 sex partner. I appreciate the info on depo prevera and will weigh the consequences of it. Thank you for info on a patch. That may possiblly be an option. Like I said, we're not rushing any sort of decision right off the back. And most definately any decision made will be going through a medical doctor. Aside from the horror stories is Norplant still around out of curiosity?

Debbie - posted on 03/28/2010

4

16

0

I work in an OB/GYN office, and feel blessed that your daughter came to you to discuss this very scary topic. She may just want it for period regulation and acne, but Ive also had an OB patient as young as 13 y/o, I feel had she been able to discuss it with her parents she may not have been in that situation or many others apparently. Im sure maturity level is a concern (they are right on the cuff) Please investigate Depo provera further as it does have some concerns with bone loss if they are on it for more than 2 years, weight gain and some women have a hard time getting periods the whole time there on it, or no period at all and then having to take a pill to stimulate there period to prevent a thickened lining, which later in life can lead to endometrial cancers. Some other options other than the pill or the shot are patches, a new patch goes on weekly or the nuva ring which is inserted vaginally, most girls arent real comfortable with that option. The Mirena IUD is also a good option, although typically offered to women who have had children, the doctor I work for has placed it in as young as 13 or 14. Hope this helps.

Mandee - posted on 03/28/2010

21

6

5

I can only recommmend talking to a gyn. If i were in your shoes i'd like to know the medical risks of having her on BC at that age. Of course we all know as you get older it can cause blood clots and such, but at 12 your body is still developing and I'm not sure if the hormones in BC can cause any development problems.

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