I need to find out more about dyslexia my daughter was just diagnosed with it. I know nothing about it! HELP!

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Angela - posted on 03/03/2009

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hi there I was dignosed quite late 16 but I found SPELD wonderful have a look for one in your area and sometimes WINZ will help with the assessment costs.

Colleen - posted on 03/02/2009

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The "DAVIS" approach is dif. worth looking at (http://www.dyslexia.com/ddai.htm ). Me and all my brothers have it, my 1 daughter has it so does/did Richard Branson, Winston Churchill, Thomas Edison, Leonardo da Vinci. We have a unique way of looking at things we just struggle with reading / writing backwards and all the above.

look at it as a gift with a handycap.

Amy - posted on 02/18/2009

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Dear Kathy and Carol,



THANK YOU!  I feel so encouraged by your response!  I'm extremely involved at school, and I'll take your advice to keep trying different approaches.  Andrew is my only boy, and I've been a mommy for a long time. (3 girls: 28; 21; 12 then by boyfriend: 6!) I've never had a child take up reading so slowly, but - he is a boy, and they are definitely different! 



Thanks again for your quick responses!  I love this group!!



Hugs, Amy

Amy - posted on 02/18/2009

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Quoting Angela:

I need to find out more about dyslexia my daughter was just diagnosed with it. I know nothing about it! HELP!






Hi Angela.  I'm so sorry to hear about your diagnoses for your daughter!  I'm not able to offer any help, unfortunately, but we think my 6 year old may be headed in that direction.  I was wondering if you could actually help me by telling me your story, how old your little girl is, how the diagnoses was determined, etc.  Our son is not "challenged", in fact, he's very bright, but he struggles with reading and writing, and my husband is convinced he may be dyslexic. I have no clue how to determine this, and his teacher just thinks he's "getting in the groove" of first grade.  He's a lefty, too, and he HATES to write!  Thanks for your time, and I'll be following your thread closely!  Amy

Kathy - posted on 02/18/2009

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Amy,



Don't worry to much right now 6 is still a young age especially for a boy.  Both my kids have dyslexia and we were not sure till they reached 3rd grade.  The best advice I have is stay involved with the school and encourage your son.  Also try different things to teach him.  He may just not be at the correct maturity age to understand reading.

[deleted account]

Hi, to Amy, These indicators can be found on the Dyslexia website]

1. Persisting factors.

There are many persisting factors in dyslexia, which can appear from an early age. They will still be noticeable when the dyslexic child leaves school.

These include:

* Obvious 'good' and 'bad' days, for no apparent reason,


* Confusion between directional words, e.g. up/down, in/out,


* Difficulty with sequence, e.g. coloured bead sequence, later with days of the week or numbers,


* A family history of dyslexia/reading difficulties.


Top of page.

2. Pre-school.

* Has persistent jumbled phrases, e.g. 'cobbler's club' for 'toddler's club'


* Use of substitute words e.g. 'lampshade' for 'lamppost'.


* Inability to remember the label for known objects, e.g. 'table, chair'.


* Difficulty learning nursery rhymes and rhyming words, e.g. 'cat, mat, sat'.


* Later than expected speech development.


Pre-school non-language indicators.

* May have walked early but did not crawl - was a 'bottom shuffler' or 'tummy wriggler'.


* Persistent difficulties in getting dressed efficiently and putting shoes on the correct feet.


* Enjoys being read to but shows no interest in letters or words.


* Is often accused of not listening or paying attention.


* Excessive tripping, bumping into things and falling over.


* Difficulty with catching, kicking or throwing a ball; with hopping and/or skipping.


* Difficulty with clapping a simple rhythm.


Top of page.

3. Primary school age.

* Has particular difficulty with reading and spelling.


* Puts letters and figures the wrong way round.


* Has difficulty remembering tables, alphabet, formulae etc.


* Leaves letters out of words or puts them in the wrong order.


* Still occasionally confuses 'b' and 'd' and words such as 'no/on'.


* Still needs to use fingers or marks on paper to make simple calculations.


* Poor concentration.


* Has problems understanding what he/she has read.


* Takes longer than average to do written work.


* Problems processing language at speed.


Primary school age non-language indicators:

* Has difficulty with tying shoe laces, tie, dressing.


* Has difficulty telling left from right, order of days of the week, months of the year etc.


* Surprises you because in other ways he/she is bright and alert.


* Has a poor sense of direction and still confuses left and right.


* Lacks confidence and has a poor self image.

Amy - posted on 02/18/2009

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Quoting Angela:

I need to find out more about dyslexia my daughter was just diagnosed with it. I know nothing about it! HELP!






Hi Angela.  I'm so sorry to hear about your diagnoses for your daughter!  I'm not able to offer any help, unfortunately, but we think my 6 year old may be headed in that direction.  I was wondering if you could actually help me by telling me your story, how old your little girl is, how the diagnoses was determined, etc.  Our son is not "challenged", in fact, he's very bright, but he struggles with reading and writing, and my husband is convinced he may be dyslexic. I have no clue how to determine this, and his teacher just thinks he's "getting in the groove" of first grade.  He's a lefty, too, and he HATES to write!  Thanks for your time, and I'll be following your thread closely!  Amy

Kathy - posted on 02/17/2009

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One more thing on dyslexia make sure the school documents that she is dyslexic.  I know that now of us want our kids lableled, but it is important.  If she is documented having dyslexia at school, colleges also have to offer help.  People with dyslexia are able to learn the same stuff as the rest of us.  The problem is they learn differentely or slower.  For instance, my daughter is allowed two days on the reading TAKS test and the math TAKS is read to her, because of her dyslexia.

[deleted account]

Hi Angela
The condition itself manifests itself in so many ways, each child is unique and some struggle more than others. In the early days for my son not only was it frustrating when he came home with his reading every night - he would constantly get simple words like the, then, there, if, is, it, no, on and so on mixed up or simply forget these words again and again. His organisational skills were very poor and if we gave him a list of instructions 'go upstairs and get dressed, do your teeth and pick up your football boots' he would go upstairs, get distracted and come down with none of those things which got him into trouble until we understood it was part of dyslexia. When I sent him away with just one instruction it got done and there were no more tears on either side. My son's handwriting was beautiful so this distracted us from realising there was a problem because I heard dyslexics had bad handwriting. However, he was very slow to get words on paper because many dyslexics struggle to organise their thoughts and lose the thread when distracted by simple things like trying to figure out what it on the board or how to spell a simple word. The book below 'The Gift of dyslexia' is really good one though and will give you a much greater understanding of your daughter and hte struggles she faces as well as her own unique way of amking sense of the world. You have to remember some very successful people are dyslexic and are probably where they are today because of it so it doens't have to be a hinderance.

Mandy - posted on 02/17/2009

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my son was told he had it when he was 9 school helped to answer alot of my questions and so did the school nurse he is 15 now and doing well in high school they expect him to pass his exams and make sure that when it his time for exams that the teachers help by reading the questions out to your daughter slowly my younger son who is ten also helps his older brother with reading and spelling with out jugement i think that is very important

[deleted account]

My son was diagnosed with it when he was 7. It was a very stressful and worrying time because he was being bullied at school and his self esteem was very low indeed. It is quite a journey. he is severely dyslexic but at 13 he can now read albeit that his reading age is that of a 9 year old. Make sure your child gets the right support at school. You may have to fight for it. Your child may also be very resistant to any help as mine was as he felt it singled him out but he soon learned he wasn't the only one with problems with reading and writing.
We tried the DORE programme which claims to be a cure for dyslexia. It isn't but it did definitely help.Try to find things your childis good at. Mine loves sports and has become very good at mountain biking, he's taken up squash and rowing even though he also has mild dyspraxia. Your daughter will need a lot of support one way or the other but it doens't have to be all bad. We are about to embark on the next stage of the journey - high school. We will have to see what this stage brings.

Julie - posted on 02/16/2009

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My step daughter has it and it slows her down in school and she has had to study twice as hard as everyone else to get the same grades but she did it. She had trouble when she got to college because they didn't give her any extra time on exams like highschool. I have heard that all cases are differant and I know that if she hears things, like book tapes, she learns better.

Kathy - posted on 02/16/2009

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I was the same way when I was told my daughter had it.  I found a great book and it was easy to read.  It is called "The Gift of Dyslexia" by Ronald D Davis.  The author himself has dyslexia, and it is easy to read.  One thing I will tell you dyslexia is very complex not all kids are the same.  My daughter is extremely dyslexic meaning she does everyday things backwards.  If you have specific questions, let me know.  I know how scary it is at first, but she will learn to cope with school.  My daughter is doing well plus playing sports.



Good Luck

Pam (pixie) - posted on 02/16/2009

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Hi there Angela.dnt know that much about it myself but my brother was diagnosed with it when he was younger and he has difficullty with spelling he gets mixed up with sum letters like a B and a D. He doesnt understand things as quick as others can but it doesnt stop people in their lives they cn lead normal lives,there is lots of help out there for this condition.How old is ur daughter u dnt say?

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