My 10 year old claims she wants to be a vegetarian

Erika - posted on 06/02/2010 ( 52 moms have responded )

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O.K. so I have a 10yr old girl, she is very mature for age, but I still don't feel she is old enough to make a decision effecting her health. My husband tells me we should just ride it out and try to support her, but I am not sure how to when I don't agree the choice. I am not saying vegetarianism is bad, but the only reason she tells she wants to be is because she dosen't want to see animals murdered. She has been a meat eater her whole life as the whole family is, and this all started after she heard her father and I talk about an old friend who happened to be vegetarian. I need help in how to deal with this, I am truely at a loss and now because of my lack of support there is way to much tension in the house between everyone, please any ideas would be greatly appreciated!

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Jennifer - posted on 06/16/2010

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The body does NOT need meat! I know of a man who is 93 and has never in his life placed meat in his mouth. He is still in full control of his mental facilities and he could out run most people that are 40! Any nutrition that can be found in meat can be found in vegetation!

Amberand - posted on 05/18/2013

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When I was 7 I chose to be a vegetarian. I hate how people say that it's just a phase because I have been ever since! I highly support vegetarianism and I think that whatever your child believes is right, you should help them all you can. Try these: Quorn, Linden McCartney, Teco own vegetarian branded food, nut burgers. Non-gelatine sweets are not as hard to find as you think! Look around and try everything. If you say no then she could just go hungry and not eat her meant like I did the night I decided to become a vegetarian. It makes life near to nothing on awkwardness and you tend to eat more vegetables! I hope I helped!

Bobbi Jean - posted on 01/03/2013

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I would fully support her. A workable solution would be to sit down with her and bone up on foods which make complete proteins. When I went through this with my daughter, at about the same age, the doctor recommended about 60 grams of protein per day, 8-9 servings of fruits and vegetables, and 4-5 of whole grains .

My daughter decided to go vegan--no meat, fish, or eggs. She and could not have milk or milk products due to an allergy. It took some planning to average about 20 grams of protein a meal. This would be a typical day for her.

Breakfast was whole wheat toast with 2 tablesppons of a nut butter, fruit, and 8 ounces of soy milk.--12 grams of protein for the nut butter, 6 grams in the whole wheat bread and 8 for the soy milk made for 26 grams of protein. (Pairing the whole wheat bread with a complete protein made it a complete protein as well.)

Lunch was a container with 1/2 cup of beans and vegetable salad (dressing on the side), and fruit. I would put an ounce of nuts in the salad 14 grams of protein. Now up to 40 grams of protein.

Dinner actually was easier. If I would make a vegetable stir fry for dinner, I would seperate out enough for the rest of the family and put the meat in that. My daughter's portion might have:

-- 1/2 cup of beans or toufu--about 8 grams of protein
--an ounce of almonds-about 6 grams of protein
1/2 cup of rice about 2.5 grams of protein--needs to be paired with a complete protein like nuts

This gave her about 18 grams of protein for dinner or about 58 so far for the day. I gave her a cup of hot chocolate made with soy milk before bed with a couple of graham crackers. This brought her total up to 66 grams of protein for the day.

In her case it actually turned out to be a good choice. She had pre-cervical cancerous cells at 16! Doctor said the balanced diet was very much in her favor. (Also a good argument for teaching teenage girls about all the things they need to do to keep healthy!) She is 31 now--very healthy and still vegetarian.

If you want more information on how we did it, you can contact me here or directly at my e-mail: bobbijean.mcdonald1@gmail.com. I am happy to share.

Heather - posted on 01/05/2013

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If this was my daughter at 10 I would sit her down and tell her that I was very proud of her for making such a big decision... and that is a sign that she is starting to grow up. I would then explain that part of making big life changing decisions like the one she is interested in making is taking the time to educate herself completely on all of the pro's and con's of such a decision- like health, financial, social, etc. I think the biggest thing that I would emphasis is the health aspect and ask her if she is really interested if she could do some research and come back to you with a vegetarian food plan that sufficiently replaces the protien that she will miss from not eating meat (and any of the other nutrients that come from meat.) This will encourage her to do some research, and if she is really serious she will stick with it. At 44 years of age I wish I had the tenacity to be a vegetarian. The way we have begun manufactuing our meat production is aweful. It really is inhuman. I would be very proud of my daughter at 10 years of age wanting to take a stand in something that she believes strongly it. I would just make sure that she is making fully 'educated' decisions. Good luck, it sounds like you've got a very smart young lady that you can be very proud of! :-)

Ava - posted on 05/07/2014

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My 9 year old is a VEGAN (no meat or DAIRY) different from a VEGETARIAN (no meat) the average vegan can live 5 more years then a non-veggie and a vegan can live up to 10 year longer than a non-vegan. So I would say yes.

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Chet - posted on 01/21/2014

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It's best to help her form good dietary habits and to be an informed vegetarian.

A lot of older tweens and teens decide to go vegetarian and just stop eating meat without properly balancing their diet. They make up the calories and fat with a lot of processed food, junk food, bad carbs, etc. They eat non vegetarian food because they don't know how to read labels.

I would support a 10 year if she decided not to eat meat, but she would have to be involved in ensuring that her diet contained the necessary protein, minerals, etc. And I'm saying this as a person who would never be a vegetarian.

Lauren - posted on 01/21/2014

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Personally, it's your daughters choice, If she doesn't agree with animals being murdered, then that just means you should be very proud that she understands and wants to take action in this matter. Aswell Vegeterians and vegans are usually a lot healthier and more active.

Lisa - posted on 04/11/2013

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I made a healthy and informed decision to stop eating meat at 12 years old. My mom fully supported me even though she ate meat and helped teach me how to cook a variety of foods to ensure i got all my nutrients. 22 years later I'm still vegetarian and still super healthy. Respect her decision to do what's right for her.

Diane - posted on 01/08/2013

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@angela barker
a bit too much info for a ten year old. i think this would either make her run screaming to hide in her closet for the rest of her life (AS IT DID ME!), or make her die-hard veg, which at this age, isnt the wisest of choices. :)

good info though, for her later in life.

Patricia - posted on 01/05/2013

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Kids go thru all kinds odd phases on their eating. I say let her try it. I bet in no time she will forget about it and be eating meat again.

Jacqueline - posted on 01/05/2013

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My niece did the same thing at about 11. It lasted a couple few years. Her mom supplemented her protein.

She's 19 now. She's been back on cheeseburgers for about 5 years now.

Angela - posted on 01/04/2013

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If the would-be vegetarian has chosen this diet because of respect for animals, it's worth noting that in real terms, probably the only TRUE vegetarians are vegans. And it's all about so much more than diet.

Dairy milk is designed to feed and nourish calves, not humans. Male calves (bullocks) born to dairy cows are killed for the veal industry. The vast majority of eggs that are marketed are produced by battery (caged) hens. So even eggs and dairy products impact on ethics. And never imagine that ready-made goods that contain eggs (like microwave meals or cakes) are only made with free range eggs! Most cheeses are created not just from milk, but with the addition of rennet, an enzyme from a sheep's stomach.

Most gel-based candy (e,g, jelly babies, wine gums, American hard gums etc ...) contain gelatine - a by-product of the butchery industry. Look out for other "hidden" animal products - like lard as used in pie crust. Gravy granules containing a meat extract.

Vegetarians do not WEAR or USE any part of an animal - fur is an obvious example but leather (another by-product of the meat industry) isn't worn by vegetarians either. Feather-stuffed pillows and quilts should not be used by a vegetarian.

Vegans, of course, take it much further. As well as boycotting milk and dairy, and eggs, they don't wear silk, they don't eat honey, they don't wear (real) pearls.

Is your daughter prepared to stop wearing leather? Vegetarians don't wear leather. It's not just about diet.

I am NOT a vegetarian or a vegan. But I know that to be wholehearted about it, I would need to embrace the total culture to genuinely be able to call myself a vegetarian. Cutting (obvious) animal products from one's diet is only part of the story.

Cristina - posted on 01/02/2013

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What is wrong with that? Our kids eat mostly fruit and veggie trays, chips and dip, eggs and waffles. I cook like a chef, hubby loves it, the kids won't touch it and I love that they are even more health conscious than we are. So, just get frozen veggies and she can thaw them out herself and eat them with some dressing, no big deal. She can eat cheese sticks, but make sure she gets iron supplements because her period is coming up and she will be anemic and miserable.

Ami - posted on 01/02/2013

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I did the same thing in High School in fact I want so far as to refuse to take any medication (not that my parents medicated me) I am talking about Advil for pain. I was completely earthy. I am not putting anyone down that chooses this life style however when I was playing a game of touch football and got hit hard enough that it broke to ribs and cracked my right hip bone. Pain meds where okay with me. I started eating meat soon there after (it lasted about six months). I feel like it is all part of trying to find yourself and it is normal, however frustrating to the parents.

C - posted on 12/31/2012

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sit down with your daughter after you do your homework about going vegetarian. my niece is now 13 and she went vegetarian at age 9, she has not gone back to meat. My brother suppported her and they would plan dinners together. I actually have 5 nieces who are everything from vegetatian to vegan. For family gaterimgs the vegans have to bring their own food because iit would be hard for them to eat from what we are servinng. for the vegetarians I usuamlly make some bean dish, not specifically for them, but they enjoy it! Good luck! Parenting is not always easy, but as long as you are informed and making sure your daughter is getting her necessary protiens.

Brooke - posted on 12/28/2012

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Honey it will be hard be you all will have to by 5 kinds of different meds and will be become I'll:((((((((

Jen - posted on 10/09/2012

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My daughter was 11 when she decided to be a vegetarian. For the same reason - she loves animals. They had also showed a couple movies in school about where our meat comes from that disgusted her (not thrilled with the school for that, but whatever). I wasn't thrilled, but she has never been a huge meat eater anyway, and I decided to let her try it. She's 15 now, and has never gone back. I think you should discuss with your daughter exactly what is reasonable, and how she will contribute. For instance, my daughter is not allowed to go vegan, although she would like to, because it's simply too hard for me to make meals for her. You and your daughter could decide on a realistic strategy, and perhaps she can help in cooking a vegetarian meal for the family once a week, or with making side dishes that she can eat instead of meat. Vegetarianism can be very healthy if done right. And if you're worried that it will stunt her growth, don't. Just makes sure she gets protein and iron from other sources. My daughter is now 5'11', so I don't think the lack of meat protein has hurt her any.

Josselyn - posted on 10/08/2012

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I think there is nothing wrong with her wanting to be a vegetarian. Let her try it out. She shouldn't be forced to eat meat if she doesn't want to. I can totally understand where she is coming from. My 13 year old daughter's friend has been a vegetarian since she was about 10 because in one of her classes at school they showed a video about what they do to animals and it changed everything.

Sherry - posted on 10/01/2012

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Are you seriously going to try and tell your daughter what she may and may not eat? I don't think you should force the poor girl to eat meat if she doesn't want to, and has a reason for it. Hell, not even a 'valid' reason! If she does not support the meat industry and the killing of animals, who are you to tell her otherwise? You are her MOTHER, not her owner. I say let her be a vegetarian or vegan if she wants to. Both are perfectly healthy lifestyles, if not moreso than a 'meat eating' diet. If you show her you don't trust her judgement already, you can't expect good results later on when things really matter.

Jessica - posted on 09/25/2012

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Well I has the problem with my 10 yr old daughter and aventually she couldn't help it every night I made amazing meat stuff 4 dinner and she was back 2 her self

Cathie - posted on 09/22/2012

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My daughter started talking about wanting to be a vegetarian at the same age. The entire family eats meat. We had her research the different types of vegetarians and also what nutrients the human body needs before making a decision. We supported her when she decided on becoming Octo-lavo. The first time she tried it she only lasted a couple if days and found it hard having dinner at friends. A few of years later when she was older, she tried again and remained vegetarian for almost a year. She struggled with replacing her protein - she did not like a lot of the meat alternatives and eventually decided to eat meat again. I would recommend that you sit down together and research what is required to remain healthy. If she still wishes to try i would recommend supporting her. While it may not be your first choice, it seems to be hers. If she feels that strongly about eating meat you may find that she eventually refuses to eat the protein that you are serving and this would only cause problems later on. My daughter had many of the same reasons for wanting to become vegetarian and by letting her try she realized the commitment it takes to live that way. Today she eats meat - however if she decided tomorrow that she wanted to become a vegetarian again I would support her providing she was eating a balanced diet and she is healthy.

Janet - posted on 09/21/2012

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im going through the same thing with my daughter at the moment she is 9 has never been a lover of meat and only ever ate chicken any thing else was a stuggle to get her to eat she would cry over having to eat meat she is a huge animal lover and so for the same reasons refuses to eat meet because the animals are killed for it so my husband and i have decided to support her decision and she can figure it out herself we will make sure she has supplements and gets plenty of protein she loves all kinds of veggies ny way so she will still have a healthy diet and she seems a lot happier, and feels like she is being heard, even though she is only 9 she has her own mind and its a great encouragement for her that her parents have listened to her she feels a little more grown up because we have let her make up her own mind and therefor creating a better relationship between us instead of fighting over the dinner table everyday!!

Rora - posted on 07/12/2012

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Sure, why not? It's a natural chance for some education. Provide her healthy options and read up on vegetarianism so that you can help make healthy decisions. Also try to have transition into being a vegetarian by just cutting down on the amount of meat she eats first, and then she can be an actual vegetarian if she wants.

Michelle - posted on 07/10/2012

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Most children don't learn to be vegetarians, they learn to be meat eaters. I think it's amazing how people are supportive of eating vegetarian for health reasons, but not ethical reasons. It's because we don't want to feel bad about our own choices. If your child decides they don't want to eat meat because they love animals and don't want to support the slaughter, why would you deny them? At 10, my son decided he wanted to be a vegetarian. He is incredibly healthy. He does it because he loves animals. I support him. He eats so well - lots of fruits, vegetables, grains and he gets his protein through cheese, beans, etc. I am proud of him. He's an incredibly sensitive boy and stands up for what he believes in. If this is what he wants and he eats healthy, why would I make him feel it was wrong to do so.

Izzy - posted on 07/10/2012

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I think it's a valid choice. You should give her the right to love animals enough to do that. My cousin has been a vegetarian since she was seven. Her mom said no, so she didn't eat any night they had meat for dinner and she almost starved. Let her try.

Hayley - posted on 03/31/2012

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I have been a vegetarian since I was ten and I have never regretted it. It is a valid reason for her to want to become a vegetarian, just make sure she is getting a balnced diet

[deleted account]

Dear Erika, I am really happy for your daughter. She have feelings for animals too. That's a great thing specially for her age. It's a myth that vegetarian food is less healthy. We have So many people here who r more than 80 yrs. Old and they were fully vegetarian for their whole life. Even many celebs are adopting beg. Food. So u should understand ur daughter's feelings and support her.

Tina - posted on 08/18/2011

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My daughter was 12 when she wanted to be a vegetarian. She is my lover, saver, and protector of all animals and feels that it is wrong that an animal must die for us to have meat! Her goal was to go for one year, New Years Day to New Year's Day, and she did!! I was very proud of her, and I still am. I allowed her to do this for several reasons and with several restrictions/guidelines. First, she was so passionate about this that I wanted to support her. She had struggled with some bullying and was feeling down in a few areas. This was one way that I could love and support her, but also allow her to achieve something to build her own sense of worth instead of relying on (kids) for that! My rules were clear. She had to eat enough protein and vegetables as part of her healthy plan, She had to include dairy in her plan, and if I felt that she was not following a healthy diet that her vegetarian days would end!
One wonderfully positive aspect to this experience was that we got to create dishes, meal plan, and cook together. She loves all things culinary as well, so this was a win win in that aspect as well! We still eat many of the new dishes that we either altered or came up with to this day!
A funny story...my daughter is a deep thinker, and she wants to have the answers and information from all sides of a topic. So, we were driving in the car one afternoon, and she asks from the backseat, "Mom, what is that other word for vegetarians that don't eat eggs or cheese?". I said, " vegans". She replied "yeah!". More thought and silence. Then she says, "Hey, Mom. Do virgins eat soy?" Hahahahahahahaha....Oh, my goodness! I almost had a stroke trying to not laugh, and simply said, "Yes, kiddo, I think they do eat soy!" Every once in a while I will repeat her funny wrong word question, and we can laugh now!

An additionally funny, yet wonderful story was her best friend, who is a terrific young lady. She wanted to badly to support my daughter, so she stated, "I will be a vegetarian with you as long as I can still eat bacon!" Always an endearing and fun memory!

This was a very special time for my daughter, and she did grow through the process in many ways.

My advice to you would be to set guidelines and allow her a time frame. It was a good way for my daughter to stand strong for something that she believed in, and for us to bond in the kitchen, but it also built her self worth and increased her knowledge about a lot of things. Beans, Cheese, Eggs, some grains, and the veggie burger products are really good sources of healthy meatless protein.
BEST WISHES!

Angela - posted on 08/17/2011

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I'm NOT a vegetarian or a vegan but a vegetarian or vegan diet provides the necessary nutrients for anyone. Any diet, whether or not it contains meat/animal products should be put together with regard to the nutritional balance required by the individual. Many diets either containing meat or not containing meat fall short of the mark because people either don't know what needs to be included or wrongly assume they do!

Carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, minerals, roughage/fibre and water are what are required.

Melanie - posted on 06/18/2010

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Also, I might add that meat protein is highly overrated. You can get as much protein from veggies as meat. Ounce for ounce broccoli, spinach, sweet potatoes and many, many others have as much protein as ground beef. And many beans have MUCH more than meat. Check it out!

Melanie - posted on 06/18/2010

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It may not be a phase. I became a vegetarian at 10 years old and still am at 32. Most of the vegetarians I know started young because it is a lifestyle change and something that is harder to stick with at an older age. Vegetarians live longer, healthier lives than non-vegetarians. Please research and you may be the one cutting out meat, too. :-) Good luck to you both.

[deleted account]

I have studied nutrition most of my life. I am a nutritional consultant and Holistic Health Practitioner it is a fallacy that you need meat. All the nutrients that the body requires can come from plant based foods!

Kristina - posted on 06/16/2010

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I have a 10 year old with the same thoughts on eating meat, she doesn't want to see the animals hurt in any way. I simply explained that there are certain things that your body needs that only come from meat and that at least once a day she has to have a serving of meat. Some days she fights eating meat and some days she doesn't. I also let her have a day or two where she doesn't eat meat but I make sure she has some good protein.

[deleted account]

I think it is noble of her. She may be 10 but she does have mind of her own. The older they get the more independent choices they will make. People choose to be vegetarian for different reasons. She is choosing because of the animals. She must recognize that she does not need to consume them -to survive. My advice, as I am a nutritional consultant is that you do support her. Take an interest in it with her. Take her to buy a book on meals and information on nutrition so she can understand how to eat to be healthy. I would be happy to help you out. I have 3 children who have been vegetarian their whole life. They are given opportunities to eat meat and they still decline. If you need any advise on meeting her nutritional needs without eating meat please call me at 774-991-0695, my name is Dawn

Carrie - posted on 06/12/2010

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My 12 (now 13) year old daughter decided to become a vegetarian about 4 1/2 months ago, after seeing something on You Tube about how animals are treated etc. before becoming our food. All of my friends said this would only last two weeks...nope still at it. You have a alot more work ahead of you...but you can get the protein in in vatrious ways. Start with the interenet---plenty of resources there. BTW, I am really not sure howyou could stop a kid from trying this...what would one do? Strap the kid down and force feed them meat? I figured my daughter would dig her heels in deeper if we didn't support it. So here we are. The Bocca products and Morningstar stuff really isn't bad--just pricey.
Here's a short recipe for a smoothy which all her friends like:

Silken soy (consult package for serving size)
Vanilla yogurt
frozen fruit (your choice)
milk
honey for sweetning to taste

Throw soponfuls in of each until you get the consistency you like (after blending in blender)

The soy is a tasteless protein!!\\Good luck with this---I have a friend whose child has been a veggie since age 9--and she's fourteen now.

Susie - posted on 06/11/2010

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OK, I am vegetarian and have been since I was 11 years old, in a family that felt that if meat was not on the table, it wasn't a meal. Forced to eat meat as a child when you see it as dead flesh is not the way to instill a good sense of what food is, and led to eating problems later in life. My mother bullied me to eat the meat and I was traumatised by the whole thing. As soon as I got to be 11, I decided enough was enough and I told my mother that I was not going to let her cook for me and I would cook my own food. She helped me to buy what I needed, I already knew how to cook, so I planned my meals and have never eaten meat or fish since then. I am healthy, I played very active sports all my life, got two degrees, had two children and I hardly ever get ill. What is important is that you support her, buy her good vegetarian cookbooks so that she understands that vegetarian food has to be good food combining and not just avoiding meat. Good range of vitamin suppliments to include all the vit Bs, essential fatty acids ( veg versions are available and work just like the fish oils) and perhaps a calcium and magnesium suppliment too.
It is essential that she gets good source of protein, there are all sorts of beans, tofu, nuts and seeds that are fantastic to use either raw or cooked. I only eat organic food and depending on where you live, there are great wholefood stores, natural food stores and lots of general grocery carrying lots of organic food and even good vegetarian ready meals for emergencies.

There is help, the vegetarian society is a great organisation that can help with advice and guidance on good nutrition. You know in many ways, I would say that my diet is a lot healthier than many of my meat eating friends, but you have to get the nutrients right. As her mum and best friend, you can help her to eat sensibly and avoid meat, or as I know she sees it like I did and still do, as just a dead animal, roadkill, flesh. Try to understand, and try to respect her opinion and please do not force her to eat what she does not wish to, it will cause problems in the future for her.

I suppose you can also view that she may also change her mind. Many young girls turn to vegetarianism at this age out of concern for the welfare of animals, and many also revert to meat eating after a few years, but that would need to be your daughters choice.
http://www.vegcooking.com/
http://www.ivu.org/recipes/

Lina - posted on 06/10/2010

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You should be proud of her for even considering being brave enough to commit to something like that. Maybe encourage her on how to help animals in other ways by donating food to animal shelters or work with her on donating both of your time to helping animals at a local zoo. That may be enough to feel that she is making a difference in this big adult world.

Jennifer - posted on 06/10/2010

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I became a vegetarian in my 30's because I learned that there is a connection between many health problems and meat. Even cancer specialists are drawing the connection between processed meats (lunchmeats and other smoked meats) and cancer. I think it is wonderful that your daughter has decided to become vegetarian. It is actually a healthier lifestyle and if she continues throughout life, she will be less at risk for Alzheimers and various Cancers. If she learns to eat right as a Vegetarian, she will also be at less risk for heart problems and other issues. To get the Omega 3's, it might be helpful to add ground flax seed to whatever you make. It has no taste but it's high in Omega 3's. She can also take a flax seed supplement but they tend to have animal products in the gel cap casing.

Protein is the other thing that most people worry about with Vegetarians but there are plenty of protein choices for vegetarians. Cheese, Soy, Tofu, fake meat like products (Bocca, Garden Burger, Veggie links, Quarn) Nuts, and legumes are all great places to get non meat protein. Do not however, buy tofurkey as a meat substitute because I promise your daughter will HATE it! Most meat eaters assume it must be like turkey and they buy it for their non-meat eating friends around the holidays. To be honest, most of us would prefer to eat the sides and avoid the tofurkey. LOL

Oh and I forgot to mention that I have a 16 year old daughter who eats vegetarian and has since she was 12 and is very healthy. Her doctor is glad she made the vegetarian choice. (Yes, it was her choice... I didn't force it on her)

Della - posted on 06/09/2010

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My son is 11 and has made the same decision. I told him he could so long as he was not militant about it...ie pushing his views on other or freaking out when meat was in his food. We are no vegiterians but eat lots of veggie meals. He also has to study options so that he can make good choices.

This started two weeks before school ended. He has slipped a few times at his favorite old meals. However he got right back on track.

Being able to make up your own mind and stick to it is an important trait. I'm proud of my son for following his heart. Make more veggies it will be good for the whold family!

[deleted account]

I come from a long line of omnivores, adn we really love our meat. My brother, head of the carnivores, married a lovely woman who has been a vegetarian since her early teens. His 3 daughters all eat meat, so it's just my s-i-l who won't. We all respect that aspect of her being, and when they are over, we carefully plan meals so that she's not just eating a salad. My youngest boy decided that tacos were a perfect meal to have when they came over, as you can choose not to put any meat in, and there are refried beans which are high in protein. On Boxing Day, I made two lasagnas, one with ground beef, and one without. There was nothing left of the no-meat one! Everybody raved about it, so now it's part of the rotation when I cook.
Your daughter selected vegetarianism as her 'calling' to individuality, and the whole family can encourage her in it without changing anything they themselves do. The only hitch would be if she is objecting to seeing everyone else eating and enjoying meat, that becomes a trickier issue. My suggestion is to have a family meeting, and let her speak freely about her choice and the reasons for it. The biggest rule at these things is that everybody has to respect the speaker, and things should be able to get ironed out. The other family members may be feeling her decision criticizes theirs, and everybody's feelings are hurt. Good luck, and don't worry!

Tammy - posted on 06/08/2010

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My daughter is 11 and doesnt eat meat. It does not have to affect her health, yogurt, peanut butter, eggs, etc....ask her doctor what she can replace for the meat. My daughter gets regular check-ups and is completely healthy, probably healthier than if she were to eat a lot of meat!

Tracy - posted on 06/08/2010

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my daughter decided the same thing although sh was 12 at the time, we all put bets on to see how long she would last, that was over a year and a half ago and she still refuses to touch meat. and its for the simular reason to your daughters that it was once alive and killed for us to eat, she is still a vegietairian, we buy her quorn foods and she loves all vegtables and milk, i also spoke to our Nurse at the doctors surgery and she said its ok as long as she is getting protiens from other things and looks healthy its ok, good luck xxx



13/07/2012

up date my daughter is no longer a vegetairan she eats very little meat now although it did last over 2 years,

Laura - posted on 06/07/2010

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i went through a similar phase when i was a teenager. if she is that passionate about it, make vegan options available to her. she needs to take some responsiblity for her choice by helping prepare her alternate menu. this could be a really cool experience for her and very empowering, but it shouldn't become an additional duty for you. my 10 yr old is starting to lean in the same direction, and i will probably buy her microwaveable meatless options like morningstar farms (yum) and Annie's. major chain groceries have lots of organic and vegan prepared foods, but she could end up becoming quite handy in the kitchen. maybe one of the side dishes for your family meal could be vegan, or she could choose and prepare that for you. i support it because we have diabetes, heart disease, and cancer in our family, and any time you choose a vegetable over a happy meal is a good choice.

Sherri - posted on 06/06/2010

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Why not respect her feelings. You can not force her to eat meat. It won't hurt her not too. It is not any harder to make sure there is other options on the table. I have not eaten red meat for 18 yrs or so because I hate the taste of it. I make meat for me kids but make sure there is other options on the table for me. I think it is great that she is taking a stand for something she feels strongly about.

Traci - posted on 06/05/2010

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Do some investigation with you daughter about being a vegetarian.There are different degrees of vegetarians.There are some who will eat fish and chicken.And there are some who won't.This is the time when you need to support her decision.My family and I have two nights out of the week that we don't eat meat.Cheese pizza,meatless spaghetti,fruit salads,ect.My son decided that he did not won't to eat beef ,pork and chicken.I cook extra vegetables on those nights I cook meat.Sometimes I'll cook fish for him.Supporting her on the decision now will go along way for the both of you when she becomes an adult.

Becky - posted on 06/04/2010

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I agree with the others. At 10 they are getting a sense of who they are as individuals and they really want to assert themselves but theyare too young to do anything about it. So what real harm is there in giving in on this one thing? Vegetarians are usually very healthy indiviuals and it gives your child something to feel passionate about in a non harmful way. so give her a multi-vitamin. throw some tofu and soy into the vegi's and wish her luck on new lifestyle. But If she changes her mind back dn't pull the "i told you so" on her. That will only cause problems between the two of you. Just be supportive of either choice she makes.

Shay - posted on 06/02/2010

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I agree with what you are saying,my son who's ten wanted to become a vegetarian so i thought if he wanted to try it okay, i just made more veggies that we're healthy and he also drinks ensure so just let her figure it out but he's eating chicken.Lol.

Bette - posted on 06/02/2010

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I agree with your husband. If she has always been a meat eater then this will only be a fase. Let her become a vegetarian, but still provide her with the protein that is found in meat. This can be done by eggs, beans, and other foods high in protein. If she is truly passionate about not wanting to see animals harmed then that is a wonderful thing, she should not feel pressured by her parents or anyone else into going against what she believes in.

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