reading

Heidi - posted on 12/02/2008 ( 19 moms have responded )

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My daughter is so frustrating, She won't sound words with out me doing it to. She hate's ready books if i haven't read them first. But then she memorizes it and she won't even be looking at the page and is reading it. I don't know what to do.

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Juanita - posted on 08/20/2012

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Our daughter is 8 yrs old. Our son is 6 1/2 yrs. He was showing the same signs as my dauther.

The program "Easyread by Oxford Learning Systems" has made a HUGE difference. They have a great support system.

I used to have sleepless nights worrying about my childen's not being able to read. Not anymore! This program is worth it's price! And the best part is, the children like it!!

Don't forget that you can get a 10% discount if you have a referral.

check out their website:
http://www.easyreadsystem.com/index/inde...

I'll be happy to answer any questions that I can.
Juanita Mueller

Juanita - posted on 08/19/2012

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We were having the same problems with our 8 & 6 yr olds. Our 8 yr old would end up crying out of frustration. She would say, "I know it." but I doubted she did. She hated to read! We found a program that explained these are called 'stress spirials'. They also explain the 7 main reasons some children have difficulty learning to read.
The program is "Easyread by Oxford Learning Systems".This is an online program that uses imaginative synthetic phonics to help struggling children learn how to read. It is specially optimized for dyslexic children and highly visual learners.

This program has helped our two children by using lessons that are less than 15 minutes per day 4 to 5 days per week. We have been using it since Mid March and now there is no more crying! Instead, our children are now making an effort to read on their own. I wholeheartedly recommend this program!

For more information you can email me at jjmueller1@verizon.net or visit their website. (If you decide to use the program you can get 10% off if you have a referral--Just use JuanitaMueller as a referral)

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Iara - posted on 08/19/2012

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I'm having the exactly same problem with my daughter who's 6 1/2 years old...how old is yours?

Ilene - posted on 07/19/2009

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read, read and read to your child. My son loves Dr. Seuss books, Sandra Boynton books, Doreen Cronin books. He's getting more advanced now and can read pretty well, but these books got him started. They are books with lots of rhyming and short phrases. Make it fun for your child. Is there a storytime locally in your area? Those can be fun with singing, stories, etc and can be a good introduction.

Athena - posted on 06/02/2009

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I have the same problem and I looked into it. And I talked to mothers that have even home schooled there children and they said that its a machurity thing. I think that what has helped most is the Leap Frog and getting books that my son picks out. So that he is more interested. It seems to help me and my son to study together.

Lyndsay - posted on 04/16/2009

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My daughter is 4 and I bought the hooked on phonics package for kindergarten and 1st grade last year and she has all of her letter sounds down and is working on site words. Struggling with that because I have to keep reminding myself she's not quite in kindergarten and she doesn't pay attention and I have noticed she doesn't learn well unless you put a song to it. I highly recommend hooked on phonics

[deleted account]

There's a lot of pressure put on parents to make sure their kids are "on track." IMHO, the whole point of reading is enjoyment and comprehension. If you don't have those two components, reading is nothing but a means to an end. I want my DD to LOVE reading! I want her to get the most out of it. And I strongly believe that if I push her to learn the skill before she's ready, I'll be sabotaging her in the long run.

Sounds to me like your daughter isn't ready for reading yet. Many children do better later - somehow age 7 seems to be the magic number. If you and your daughter are feeling frustrated, reading will become a chore. Making reading fun is half the battle!

Why don't you focus on pre-reading skills right now? Reading to your DD (which I'm sure you're already doing) is a great way to encourage reading comprehension. You can also try giving her simple sewing and finger knitting (http://www.wikihow.com/Finger-Knit) projects to develop her fine motor skills so writing will come easy when the time comes. Also be sure to use big vocabulary words when you speak to her - and if you can find stories to read to her that use new words, all the better. Building her vocabulary is a great way to get her ready for reading, too.

[deleted account]

BOB Books, Letter Factory and having her pick out sight words from books that you are reading to her are all techniques I used to teach my son to read at the age of four. Please know that until she has some words memorized sounding out every word is too laboriuos for her. Memorizing is part of learning to read. Kids learn though repitition. Let her memorize it, then like in BOB books, have her read a book that has some of the same words that she already knows and a couple of new ones. You can intro the new words outside of the book a day before she is expected to read it. It makes it less frustrating for new readers. Help her out for now and she will tackle sounding out new words when she feels ready and confident!

Donna - posted on 01/22/2009

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I can relate. My 5 year old told me flat out that she didn't want to learn how to read because that would mean that I would stop reading to her. I tried to tell her that we could read together, that she could read me a page and I could read the next one. She was excited but still a little skeptical. I agree with the suggestion of the Letter Factory, my daughter loved it. I think the best thing that you can do is to make it fun, encourage her, do a lot of repetition and constantly point out the progress that she has made and don't dwell on the negative. Like everything else, she will get frustrated and discouraged if she thinks she will only get into trouble. One of the things that I did was send little notes in her lunch bag. Simple ones like I love you, surprise, see you at 3:30..etc.... This way she looked forward to lunch time and she tired to sound out the letters herself or ask for help, but you can bet that the following week, she knew exactly what I had wrote. I hope this helps.

Kim - posted on 01/19/2009

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I highly recommend the Leapfrog DVDs too. We started several years ago with the The Letter Factory, moved to the Word Factory and then to the Storybook one (learning to read). My girls love them!



We also have the BOB books and I recommend them too. A great place to find the beginning reader books is through the Scholastic books if your school sends those home. We got a bunch more early readers, like the BOB books.



It's important to make it fun and not like work to them. I still get grief sometimes from my girls when I ask them to read, rather than me read to them, but a lot of it is just building confidence in them. They get frustrated too if they think they're not getting something and then they don't like to try. So I don't really force them. I really want to foster a love of reading.



Hope that helps!

Traci - posted on 01/16/2009

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I hope this is encouraging ... my oldest son refused to attempt to read on his own before mid-First grade.  He had been 'identified' as gifted and was in a class of all readers ... I was frantic that he read and tried everything (and I was a reading teacher berfore I had kids!!).  My son did start to read on his own, but not until he was good and ready, and now cannot put a book down.  He gets in trouble (at home and at school) for reading when he should be doing something else.  =)



I'd always known that some kids are 'ready' to read earlier than others but it took my real-life experience to understand it.  In the meantime, I continued to read to him daily, pointed out words everywhere we went, and kept his room stocked with lots of fun books. 

Debbie - posted on 01/13/2009

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Make a fun game out of it! have her pick out the book.... then have her pick out sight words from the book, this will be a week process only 1 book per week... 2nd night you read the sentence then have her pick out the sight word(s) in it then have her read it.. not only is she identifying she is putting words together, she is frustrated that she can't read that is why she is memorizing them my son's did the same... good luck

Maria - posted on 01/13/2009

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My daughter also didn't respond that well to practicing sounding out words with me. Once she knew the basic sounds of the letters, I found a set of actual beginner books that I would HIGHLY recommend. They come in a box of 10 and are called Bob Books. The first book only uses 4 letter sounds in the whole thing. It starts simply enough that a 4 or 5 year old can actually read it on their own. That builds initial confidence in reading and then they add another sound or two with each book. My daughter can read most picture books now but she still goes back to her Bob books when she wants to read something that boosts her confidence. It just makes her feel great about her reading! The Bob Books are a bit different from all the other beginning reading books that I found because the others still use all of the sounds in the "entry level" books. For us, the gradual introduction to sounding out words worked better.

Kathi - posted on 01/12/2009

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I second the recommendation of the Leapfrog videos. My two kids love them. I also just found out from talking to her my daughter's kindergarten teacher that the picture books aren't really designed for kids to read. Their vocabulary is a bit advanced because they're meant for adults to read to kids. So maybe a beginning reader would be easier for your daughter. Also, it might be an issue of finding books she likes. I know that my daughter resisted reading until we found books she loved. She likes the Fancy Nancy books (though they have some French words and the vocabulary is more advanced) and Magic Treehouse books. And she likes funny books. Those books may not work for your daughter but my point is to find books she likes and keep in mind picture books may be not be as beginning as we tend to think they are. Best of luck to you!

Joy - posted on 01/12/2009

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I am a mother of three, I have a 10, 7 and 5 year old. My 5 year old was doing the same thing . She didn't want to sound out words or read and I bought a barbie computer that works on letter sound last year. She loves it. It costs around $18. Now I have no problam. One of her teachers told me that every kid is differant and when they are ready they will let you know.

Lucia - posted on 01/12/2009

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I recommend (as a parent & teacher) getting The Letter Factory video by LeapFrog ~ they also have the word factory, storybook factory & other progressive videos. Start with the letter factory though - it introduces letter recognition & sounds in a fun way!! :)

Stefani - posted on 12/07/2008

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omg!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i have the same problem abd it frustrates me soooooo bad!!!!

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