Making your own baby food?

Melissa - posted on 09/23/2009 ( 11 moms have responded )

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Has anyone ever made their own baby food? I want to do it for my son but I have never done it before. What do you have to do to make sure it is right and ok for your baby to use??

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Liz - posted on 09/24/2009

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Hi, I've started weaning my son already on doctors advise as he's a very big and hungry boy. I make all his food myself and it's really cheap and easy if you batch cook and then freeze it. So far Lewis eats pureed carrots, sweet potato, swede, pear and apple. (sometimes mixed with baby rice)
My method is to wash, peel, chop and then boil untill tender. Then I blend it untill it's a smooth puree and spoon it into an icecube tray. Once that's frozen I pop the cubes of puree out and put them in freezer bags and label the bags with the contents and date. Fruit and veg will keep for 3 months in the freezer.

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There is also some recipes on parents.com. I plan to make my own when I start solids, but we're not starting them yet.

Marina - posted on 09/23/2009

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They have a great baby food cook book at Williams & Sonoma! It teaches you how to make baby food, which foods they should be eating at different ages, how to store it, and how long it's still good after making it! My son isn't on baby food quite yet, but I am certain this cook book will have me 100% ready!

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Miriam - posted on 10/30/2009

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This is copied from the info the doc gave us. Check with your pediatrician to see if this applies to you too.

Warning: do not home-prepare these foods:
Beets, turnips, carrots, spinach, and collard greens. In some parts of the country, these vegetables have large amounts of nitrates, a chemical that can cause an unusual type of anemia in young infants. Baby food companies are aware of this problem and screen the produce they buy for nitrates. They also avoid buying these vegetables in parts of the country where nitrates have been found. Since you cannot test for this chemical yourself, it is safer to use commercially prepared forms of these foods, especially while your child is an infant. If you choose to prepare them at home anyway, serve them fresh and do not store them. Storage of these foods may actually increase the amount of nitrates in them.

Also, buy a fine mesh sieve to strain your foods through to make sure there are no lumps or skins... even the smallest lump can be a choking hazard.

Mohini - posted on 10/30/2009

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hi melissa .. i have always made food at home for my baby ... you can give her mashed rice-- 2 tablespoon of rice cooked with abt 2 cups of water .. making it a soup like consistency .. add a dot of butter if u like .. this is a v good food to start with .. then pureed apricots and figs, muskmelon juice, beetroot and cauliflower soup, potato and carrot soup.. .. barley cooked with honey or jaggery, stewed apple - puree and strain it .. can add a dash of home made butter to it

Pattie - posted on 10/27/2009

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I just started making my own baby food and it's soooooo easy!! I bought a book called "Cooking for Baby" by Lisa Barnes. It's an awesome book but I'm sure there are many other great ones out there. They'll answer all your questions, like when to start, what to serve and how to cook it. The tools I've found that I need are: a food processor (way easier than using a blender and you DO NOT need to buy the most expensive one. I found most were about $100 but I got a Black and Decker one at Zellers (HBC) for $50 and it works great) I al bought a steamer basket; this keeps your veggies and fruits from over cooking and they're super cheap to buy. I picked up a sieve (a fine mesh strainer) - this is really helpful for things like blueberries that retain some of their skin in processing. When I cook or steam foods I keep the peelings on or toss already peeled foods in the pot or pan when cooking - this preserves more of the nutrients during cooking and I always remove them before putting them through the food processor. If you want even more nutrients in your babies food add breast milk instead of water when getting your food to the right consistency. Whew, I'm long winded today - best advice is to buy a book!

Carla - posted on 09/29/2009

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Quoting Rochelle:

I'm getting ready to move from cereals to veggies soon and I want to make my own. What's the rules for taking the food on outings? -- Does it have to stay refrigerated or can it be at room temp for a few hours? Does it have to be heated up before serving?



If you freeze the food then take it out of the freezer right before you go out in a sealed container it will take a few hours to defrost anyway. It does have to be heated until piping hot and then cooled if you do it this way though. I find it to be the easies way. The other option is using a non cooked puree such as avocado or banana when you go out and then you take a fork with you and prepare it when you need it.



If the food is too thick add a little water or preferably some of babies usual milk (breast or formula). I find that this cools it down quicker too if added after the heating process. Remember that breastmilk shouldnt be microwaved so if you use a microwave to heat up the food dont add the milk until after the food has been heated.

Krystle - posted on 09/28/2009

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http://www.wholesomebabyfood.com/
little alex has been on baby food since his 2 month mark... i know it is early but the formula just wasnt cutting it. here is the link to my bible.. lol it helps me alot. he is eating 2 oz at a feeding... the easiest thing to do is take a banana and a mill with you if you go anywhere... i do.. i eat half and he gets roughly the other half.. kinda alittle bonding time.. i take a bite and give him one...
i found that the Nuby infant feeding spoons system works wonders if they dont like normal spoons.. plunger bottle that pushes food into the spoon :) great invention

Rochelle - posted on 09/27/2009

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I'm getting ready to move from cereals to veggies soon and I want to make my own. What's the rules for taking the food on outings? -- Does it have to stay refrigerated or can it be at room temp for a few hours? Does it have to be heated up before serving?

Carla - posted on 09/24/2009

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Quoting Liz :

Hi, I've started weaning my son already on doctors advise as he's a very big and hungry boy. I make all his food myself and it's really cheap and easy if you batch cook and then freeze it. So far Lewis eats pureed carrots, sweet potato, swede, pear and apple. (sometimes mixed with baby rice)
My method is to wash, peel, chop and then boil untill tender. Then I blend it untill it's a smooth puree and spoon it into an icecube tray. Once that's frozen I pop the cubes of puree out and put them in freezer bags and label the bags with the contents and date. Fruit and veg will keep for 3 months in the freezer.



This is what I do. It means as they get used to bigger portions and more tastes you can defrost 1 carrot cube and one other veg cube and mix them together for yet another taste. (but only introduce 1 new thing at a time). Steaming veg keeps in more nutrients than boiling though, but if you do boil dont do it for too long, just until they are soft enough to blend.

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