Do I or Don't I tell the teacher my son is on ADHD medication?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jessica - posted on 09/14/2011

12

14

0

You should definitely include the information in his school records for the nurse, but I don't think that you should make it a point to tell the teacher. I would certainly not be afraid to mention the fact that he has ADHD, but I don't see the point of making his school life about his "issue". I have never told my son's teachers about his medications unless they specifically ask. And if they are tactless enough to mention that "it might help to up the dosage" I tell them that it's at the discretion of myself and his doctor, but I will mention it at his next doctor's appointment. And this did happen once. I feel that it's better for all of us if we don't focus so much on his medication or on his ADHD, but to focus more on school work, his friendships, and other things school related. Just my opinion, but since we moved out of the district where he was originally diagnosed, he's had a much happier and easier school life. The school has no say in whether or not your child is medicated, and as long as he doesn't have to take his medication at school, it's something that is between you, your doctor and your child. Good luck.

Kim - posted on 12/04/2011

118

13

0

Louise Douglas, I am curious on how your son's grades are...do you live in a small town? Is he still in ele. school? Yes you have every right to "Honor your son's privacy"....you also have every right to make sure he has an IEP and if he needs extra help with work, or while not in a IEP class and the kids are distracting him, ...the noise bothering him....he has the right to go to the IEP classroom and do his work without being bothered...He has a right to ask for copies of notes if he can't keep up in class.



We have to protect our children...yes we do! I do mine...on their privacy by not giving out their SS# no matter what doctor etc ask for it....No one needs a Minor's SS# ...and put in the wrong hands could ruin your child(s) future credit history! Remember there is a fine line between protecting their privacy and our own pride. I am truly sorry to hear that you can't trust the teachers in your community/school...i't's a terrible shame, you are put in that position!...(that you have to worry about if they spend time in the breakroom talking about your son and not in the classroom doing their job).



See no matter what they say you have the right to have your say! I know it's hard...dealing with teachers and the public's lack of education on these children! They are gifted! I have 5 with ADHD, I had it...All of my Neices and Nephews have it (runs heavy in our family)...and everyone of them are in ADVANCED classes! These children are far from being stupid or handicapped...



There are downside(s) of not letting the school know he/she has ADHD. He/she is missing out on the advantage of having an IEP class, and the teacher take note for signs that his/her meds might need to be re-evaluated. Remember it is against the law for any Teacher to say they believe your child has ADHD...so..the teacher not knowing..well that's just going to bring a whole knew subject to the breakroom...oh poor ........I know he has ADD but I can't say anything to his mother except the normal keywords...(and if the teacher does do that and you don't pick up on...wow the buzz will be the buzz!)



If you wait on the report cards....well.... by the time you get the report card and see the difference it could be weeks of bad grade due to the medication not working like it did before.....I pray that you don't feel you have to hide it, for fear of discrimination. No parent should have to feel that way!!!! Wishing you and yours the best! Happy Holidays!



A last thought....If I were you...and If I had friends such as the one's you mentioned that are teachers...maybe..just maybe..it would do them good for you to stand up for all CHILDREN no matter if they have ADHD or not and say something to them such as..." I would never tell my kids teachers about any issue that my kids may ever or could ever have if their teachers are like you and have nothing better to do then to discriminate those you are there to help!" Not saying you have to or should...but maybe they need to be reminded why they wanted to be a teacher in the first place???? ;)

Louise - posted on 12/02/2011

48

0

0

Hi. I have a different opinion about what info we share with the school. I have friends that are teachers. As much as we would like to believe that all teachers have kids' best interest in mind, they are not all so inclined. Many gab in the teachers lounge about "problem" kids and which ones are on meds. My son is on meds and has ADHD and I have not and will not share this info with the school. I do not believe they need this confidential medical info. They are given strategies to help him in the classroom by not singling him out and that they need to deal with him on a positive manner. That's it! It is my job to protect him from those who want to midjudge and label. Noone but my husband, myself and my sons medical professionals need to know more.

Nicole - posted on 09/07/2011

56

5

1

Always! The school usually requires information on any medication that is being taken by a child, for good reason, as well as any allergy problems. Telling the teacher / school administration is the first step in getting everyone on board to providing the best education your son can receive! Your son's teacher will be a really good ally in letting you know how the medication is working away from home, too, so you, your son's teacher & your pediatrician can work out the best dosage / medication that works for him. Oh, also, many schools now have additional benefits, social interaction counseling, more 1-1 time individualized to a students needs, and something called an IEP, (Individualized Education Plan,) for students with ADHD. This will really help give your son a foot-up with his education. Good luck!

Christine - posted on 12/05/2011

3

69

0

Definetly Tell them!1 that way they know exactly what is going on with y our child.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

49 Comments

View replies by

Melissa - posted on 12/19/2011

0

0

0

we told my daughters teachers only because when she started in kindergaten she had not been diagnosed yet so we were looking for help to see if it was only us who seen the problems we noticed but then once she was diagnosed and she started school this year we told her teacher so that she would be aware of her condition... she is a really good child but she has problems with staying focused and she is always moving and cant sit still if she does not have her medication.. her they say that she should be reading at a lvl 3 for first grade and she is reading on almost a lvl 10 so she can focus and do very well and she is really good at math as well she just has problems sometimes determining what half of a picture is which is only because she loses interest in it i belive. but i think it is totally up to you on what to do i personnaly think that it is a good idea that way you can stay connected with the teacher and when you have an appointment with the doctor you can let them know anything that is noticed by you or the teacher because they may want to change medication or dosage

Carrie - posted on 12/18/2011

10

82

2

My theory is the more they know, the more they can help. My daughter teachers are a big part of helping regulate her meds...I am not with her in school, they are.

Deina - posted on 12/15/2011

4

28

0

I don't care what teacher's think about my child's diagnosis ,only that he is taught!Having a disability of any kind only builds character, not shame! Yes my child learns differently but he is a child Who knows this and I foster his attitude about his own perception of what is success and what is failure for him. ADHD children cannot control the impulses that make their minds run faster than their bodies, no matter how hard they try and they do hence medications and informing teacher's who are willing to help accommodate your child's needs so they are successful. The student does only as good as the teacher!

Kim - posted on 12/06/2011

118

13

0

Charity,

I am curious...with the suggestion from your childs teacher and doctor to re-evaluate or to up your child's meds...why you feel you shouldn't? Every child/adult with ADD/ADHD has to have their meds re-evaluated. As children grow their body weight increases..., then you have the fact that no matter what medication your on, in time our bodies get used to it(amuined)...so it needs to be increased...

It is very important to be in communication with your child's teacher, if not your child's grade will start failing, they could have more issues with social behavior etc......unless you feel there is another reason for the behavior that your child is exhibiting such as ODD, Aspergers, Bi-Polar etc...that you feel the doctor shouldn't be re-evaluating his/her ADD/ADHD meds.

In time if you don't address the issue the schools can call CPS and turn you in for neglect. I hope if you don't feel the doctor is doing his job and evaluating all issues, I hope you can find a doctor that can better assist you and your child.

Hope things work out for you!
Happy Holidays!
Kim

Charity - posted on 12/06/2011

8

8

1

I have found that if your child does not have to take the medicine durring school hours (as my son takes his 1st thing in the morning, and as soon as he comes in from school) that it could be much easier on you and your child. Once the teacher knows that he/she is on meds, anytime the child acts out, the teacher will bug you and the childs Dr. telling them that the dosage of the meds needs to be increased.... At least in my experience this has happened. Of course all teachers are different and there are actually some out there that want to help instead of just doping them up. You need to just feel out what kind of teacher this is and go from there... Good luck! =)

Kim - posted on 12/05/2011

118

13

0

@ Louise,



Understandable...I would be like you if our system was the same as yours. Here schools get more funding for these children...and can't get an IEP unless there is good reason..which means they have to know the issue to be approved for the IEP option. Even still here in America most states don't require info on which type of medication your child is on ...unless they need to take one while during school hours. Thank you for further giving us information on where you live and why you feel the way you do! I would do as you do if I were in your country and had teachers that gossip and discreminate...thats just sad!!!!



Happy Holidays to All!

Kim

Louise - posted on 12/05/2011

48

0

0

@Kim. I live in a big city in Canada. His grades are good. He is now 12 and in grade 7. He has been on meds since grade 3. They work well. I do have an IEP which details strategies in how to deal with him positively. This is key to good behavior and less anxieties for him. We do not need to provide a diagnosis or identification here in Canada to have an IEP for ADHD. To me that is very good in protecting him from judgment and medical info getting to those who don't need it. I appreciate that for many you feel better sharing it all with the teachers. For us that was not the best route. I strongly believe it has helped avoid much stigma and labeling that I have seen with other kids. It was awful how they were treated and gossiped about. That's why I say it is a personal choice that you need to make weighing all the factors.

Melissa - posted on 12/05/2011

2

89

0

My son has ADHD and I always let his teachers know because he has his good days and his bad days. He has a lot more good days than bad days so I want the teachers to know that when he does have a bad day its because of his ADHD and not because he is just acting out.

Louise - posted on 12/05/2011

48

0

0

It is a personal choice and one needs to do what is right for their child and family. Noone should tell someone else otherwise. What we are doing is working well for my child. He is doing great. Just a regular kid. That is wonderful for us.

Louise - posted on 12/03/2011

48

0

0

It's definitely a personal choice. I have Been successful this far in allowing my son to be treated like a normal child. Not a labelled one. He is doing well. Noone thinks anything else. His private medical info stays private and not a topic for the teachers to chat about. I was told about a study that was done with a special needs class. A supply teacher went to cover the class and instead of being told the class was special needs she was told it was a gifted class. She dealt with the kids in a very different way. Not looking for something wrong. The class did very well. I truly believe that when one knows about a diagnosis and meds, they look for a problem. That is my true belief. I will continue to honor my sons privacy and right to be treated the same as everyone else.

Deina - posted on 12/03/2011

4

28

0

You should definitely converse with your child's teacher about him or her taking medicine for ADHD. Most teacher's appreciate that information because it starts building a relationship between home and school about your child's education. I can tell you that most parents who leave that info out are left with the assumption that the child just is goofing off and that isn't the case if you child is ADHD or ADD. Definitely share you'd be surprised how they can relate because your child's teacher may have a child of their own who has the same diagnosis.

[deleted account]

Annie most teachers won't say anything if their behavior improves. If u don't trust the school or teacher they r in the wrong class. I have a great relationship with my kids teacher I never worry about telling them anything because I know they r gonna respond to me and tell me the truth of what is going on in class

Annie - posted on 11/22/2011

3

7

0

What if you don't trust your child's school and teachers? I keep feeling like they're looking for more things that are wrong with my daughter and that she's a statistic to them. If we choose to medicate our daughter, I'm not going to tell them right away because I want to see if they notice a difference.

[deleted account]

The whole reason I go to meet to the teachers is so I can tell them about my daughter's ADHD. I tell them because I want them to know if she starts acting weird I want to know so I can check on her medicine dosage

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/11/2011

6,434

12

67

According to HIPPA in the US a teacher does not need to know about a child's medication. A school nurse should be made aware. Especially if your child will have to take a does of the medication during school hours and in case of reactions.

But I would tell the teacher if you trust him or her not to make rash judgements

Erica - posted on 10/11/2011

28

24

5

Definitely tell the teacher because it is important for the school to know and important for your child in his learning environment. Remember ADHD is a disorder not a label. Open communiction is the best because you can get him extra help if needed because the schools are required to provide the assistance. My son has Autism and ADHD and has receive an emence amount of assistance because I spoke up.

Heather - posted on 09/28/2011

17

21

0

A child's education is a shared responsibility between home an school. I belive it is important to share information with the teacher, and to take an active role in developing strategies for both home and school. There is far more to managing ADHD than just meds.

Lisa - posted on 09/27/2011

12

0

1

Personally I have found that the more open we have been with his teachers, the better response and cooperation we have received. My son is 8 and just had his meds increased and a new one added due to the oppositional behavior. We made sure the teacher knew so he could be looking for any side effects that may crop up. We also wanted to know how he was doing in class since the change. It has worked well for us. I also think it is important to be open with the teacher because then they don't think your child is just being "wild" for no reason, they have a legitimate medical diagnosis.
As for navigating the whole special ed system, etc. Wow, that has been a drama. He was in special ed due to speech therapy and not for ADHD. He was dropped out of special ed because his is very smart and his test scores were all above average. Apparently the decision as to whether a child needs special ed depends on whether it is affecting their learning ability. Although it is affecting his, it is not enough to warrant special ed. That is when his teacher from last year who has a special needs child herself told me about the 504 plan. The 504 is under the Americans with Disabilities Act from 1973. This act states that schools have to make accommodations for any child that has a medical diagnosis in order for that child to receive the same education provided every other child. This has allowed him to have accommodations for the standardized testing which begins in third grade here and I knew he wouldn't sit still for. He also has safety nets for when he becomes overstimulated and overwhelmed by the activity in the class. There are all kinds of options available for the child with ADHD under this act. Search around the internet and you can find all kinds of info on it. I try to stay abreast of things, but the 504 was new to me and I had to do my homework to make sure my child received a fair shake at school. It makes the school acknowledge the disability and forces them to accommodate it. Unfortunately sometimes that is the problem. Kids with ADHD can be difficult to manage behaviorally and it is easy for the school to just call the parents and send them home. This happened many times last year, but I think we have a much better plan in place and so far this school year has gone well. Do your homework and know your rights!

Bobbi - posted on 09/25/2011

7

10

0

That is all up to you. But when you inform the teacher, then they are more aware of the situation with your son, and many have dealt with this with other students. Teachers are very helpful and can help you out to with any behavioral problems that can happen.

Amy - posted on 09/25/2011

267

7

21

Kim Semmel, ALP stands for Advanced Learning Program. I apologize for using an undefined acronym.

I think the key here is to understand the politics in your school district before making disclosures. We all want to act in the best interest of our kids. Usually that means disclosure, but sometimes (esp when medication works very well) that means delyaing or withholding the diagnosis. :)

Rosie - posted on 09/25/2011

8,657

30

315

you don't have to mention whether or not they're on medication, but you SHOULD mention that they have ADHD. they have resources that they can use to help your child learn better. :) also, the nurse is the only one that is informed of my child's medication (when i had him on it). not the teacher.

[deleted account]

I think it s important to tell them. I am a mom with two boys with ADD. They can help you with other resources if necessary. Its hard to think about your child being "labeled", I get that.. They do have it in his/her school file. Good Luck!

Kim - posted on 09/24/2011

118

13

0

Amy Walker ....Curious of what ALP stands for, could you explain please?



Here in Oklahoma in order to have your child placed in a IEP class they require the information. I don't take offense to the Term learning disablity.....but I do believe that is a incorrect statement over all. ADD/ADHD children learning difference seems more appropriate...to me... Not mentioning it to your child(s) teachers is only going to create a problems. You won't have the communication that's needed to know if the medication level needs to be re-evaluated. They never stay at the same level (of dosesage...is what I'm referring to). They grow, they will end up needing a higher doseage unless they grow out of their ADD/ADHD...which I pray for ...for our son(s) & daughter(s)...but it has also been a blessing in disquise.



We were blessed with a great pediatrican that did all the research he could and keeps up on all new findings of ADD/ADHD because he also has a son with ADD/ADHD.

I will share some facts with you.

1. did you know over 90% of your surgeons have ADD/ADHD?

2. Did you know they brains are on fast speed and just need help slowing it down...to retain...

3. did you know they are ADVANCED compared to the AVERAGE child?

4. did you know most of these children... if given every opportunity with medication and IEP's grow up to be great people ...inventors, ablity to work with small parts like it's nothing...they have more passion for their interest and hobbies... most of the time it's easily seen by some as obcessed behavior with doing certain things or working with the same type of subject. Video games can show potential game developers, testers, military jobs, car and aircraft design's and programs....



Don't sell these kids short! This is why I'm not sure the term "learning disablity" They are taught the same material as the average classroom child, just taught in a different way...usually song's, rymthes ...



Before my son was diagnosed with ADHD....he was the child all his teachers wished all other kids where just like him....then the calls came.. Your son is starting food fights in the lunchroom, your son is vandilizing the bathrooms...I was like...ummmm I think you have the wrong mom...lol ....they didn't, I started hearing the keywords...hung up and the light bulb came on and I called the councelor right back! My son was failing Math and Reading...wayyyy failing....but once we got him on his medication, let him know what ADD/ADHD was and what it meant to him he held his head high and proceeded to do his best. In 4th, 5th and 6th grade he carried a 98% in math...was on the honor roll.



"OMAPP" which stands for Oklahoma Modified Alternate Assessment Program. He had been tested before and showed he was ADVANCED...but no one explained to me at what level it meant til this year...(his first year of 7th grade at his first IEP meeting for the year). The teachers had already received his 6th grade OMAAP test results, I had not. Results showed in Math he tested to be in the 8th grade 2nd nine weeks level....in Reading he tested to be in the 9th grade 3rd nine weeks level. I was beside myself to finally understand what ADVANCED meant to them. It recomfirmed what I had been told about them being ADVANCED compared to the AVERAGE child. Don't forget that was a test he took in 6th grade...we decided to have him tested again so we can see where he stands now, and if the same or greater then last year we will be putting him in the ADVANCED Math and Reading classes to give him more of a challange. The school benefits to having child(ren) in IEP classes, your child(ren) benefits even more!



Our son can't handled if the class is too loud, so he is given an option to go to another room to do his work so he isn't distracted. He is taught in a way that has made it easy for him to remember. He has his parents and teachers not just saying I care about you, but being active in showing they care how he does, to give him the best opportunity for his potential jobs or life experiences!



If your child has to take a short acting or additional medication during school hours, they have to know, they keep it in the office. Why take shame in having an ADD/ADHD child! Hold your head high! Educate those that don't know the true meaning of ADD/ADHD! If you don't...you won't be a positive influence for your childs family, ...future career(s), or friend/married/relationships.

Tawnya - posted on 09/23/2011

30

43

0

I have let my daughters teacher know and they have adjusted their teaching methods to help her. They let her do things such as stand up to do school work. It helps them to understand why a child may be acting out and they will know what they need to do to help your child do better.

Melissa - posted on 09/23/2011

25

10

3

Yes! This year I gave our kids teachers a letter to keep in my childs file letting them know what they had and that they take medication. Also told them I would let them know when my child had a dr appt. and if any changes were made. I also ask the teacher to let me know if behavior/focus or anything changed. Plus if a teacher knows they can look appetite changes, mood swings, etc. I also included all my contact info so everything was in one place. If a teacher knows up front they can help you with any issues when/if they arise rather than after the fact.

Anne, Or Annie - posted on 09/21/2011

7

6

0

The more the teacher knows about your child and their needs the better they are able to help you and your child, I would tell the teacher.

Carol - posted on 09/19/2011

32

3

0

My son is medicated and at a case conference with the principal, teacher, ISRT, myself and his Resource worker ( he is a foster child) The resource worker and I talked prior to the meeting and felt it important that the school have all the information. Meds, permanancy with me as his foster parent and his preference that I be referred to as his mom. etc.. so that the school had a better idea of some of his triggers . Also by knowing what meds he's on, they were able to tell me what time of the day they were having more outbursts and from that I was able to get the Dr. to tweak the times he is to get the meds to carry out the whole school day. The school has been a great support for him and myself.

Delores - posted on 09/19/2011

18

56

0

Ok so this is a no brainer for me to answer this question because I think it is very important that you tell your childs teachers because alot of teachers and principals as well do not understand that when a child acts out in class it doesnt always mean that the child is just our right bad. Tell the teachers and principal will give your child more chances at school to learn rather than being sent out of class or home. Just because you tell them do not mean that your child will be treated differently. If anything it helps everyone to understand more why your child reacts the way they do. Good luck!

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/13/2011

6,434

12

67

That's when you tell a school nurse since as a nurse they're bound by HIPPA not to disclose any medical information to anyone except someone who'd need it.

I should ask my mom how my parents did it in school though because when I was in elementary school myself and this other girl had to go to the nurse's office to get our ritalin before lunch.

Phyllis - posted on 09/13/2011

580

23

189

Personally I would disclose it simply because in the event of a medical emergency they need to be able to tell paramedics about your child's medications.That being said, a child on regular medications should be wearing a medic alert ID anyway.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/11/2011

6,434

12

67

Amy's right. You don't have to reveal to a teacher or anyone else which medications you're on or any doctor's orders. Even if you take care of the person they have no right to know anything about you.

On the first day of school last week my husband and I told my daughter's teacher that she has ADHD. She's very smart, but she gets distracted easily. This is also something her teachers from last year noticed. Abby had many friends last year and this year as well. We just have an issue with the impulsiveness which can happen with ADHD and ADD children (I speak from personal experiance because I have ADD and my husband and my brother both have ADHD)

You are not required by law in either the US or Canada to reveal any medications your child is taking to your teacher. You may have to reveal them to a health care professional. But that's it. Any and all medical information is on a need to know basis. If he has an epi pen for an allergic reaction tell the teacher, ADD meds don't.

Amy - posted on 09/11/2011

267

7

21

We switched schools after my son's first year on meds and did NOT tell the new school about the diagnosis. He had severe social problems previously, and we did not want him to be treated like a "diagnosis." I did tell his teacher at the first parent teacher conference, however. Sometimes I wish I hadn't disclosed it, but overall I am glad we handled it the way we did.

Since moving to the new school, Cole has FRIENDS, is doing very well, and is in the ALP for reading and the "advanced" (but not ALP) group for math. I'm not so sure he'd have been placed with his abilities if he'd been thought to have a "learning disability." ... Granted, many ADHD kids DO have a hard time learning, but the stereotype makes it harder on kids who don't have a harder time learning... they remain bored and hyperactive, and the downward spiral continues.

Anyway, you just have to figure out what is important for YOU.

Regarding communication about medications, it's not required. They cannot require you to divulge confidential medical information. I don't trust my son's medical information to be kept appropriately confidential in our school district, so I prefer to keep that private for now. We've just had too many bad experiences, and they don't have any REAL medical professionals on site, anyway, so medical information isn't going to be all that helpful. I cannot forsee any kind of medical emergency that would require this sort of disclosure. Our area has a solid electronic health records system, so if he ever needed emergency medical care, I know that anything REAL medical professionals would need would be right at their fingertips. :) Teaching professionals are not under the umbrella of HIPAA, so be aware that anything you tell them should be considered "public knowledge."

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/08/2011

6,434

12

67

Brittany, in New York state ADD and ADHD do qualify a child for an IEP. I should know because my brother and I both have IEPs because of ADD and ADHD respectively.

You should tell your child's teacher that your child has ADHD, the medication is only on a need to know basis.

Nicole - posted on 09/08/2011

56

5

1

@Brittany Culley: Perhaps it's different from district to district, (or even from school to school,) but where we live ADHD is most certainly a qualifier for an IEP. Been going to them 2-3 times a year since my little one was in first grade. ADHD is a learning disability, or at the very least enabling learning disabilities to flourish without a proper IEP, so my advice if your school / district doesn't offer IEP's for children with ADHD is to get involved, ask your pediatrician to write a letter of recommendation for an IEP and lobby the board or teachers involved in your child's education for one. My daughter's IEP has LITERALLY saved her academic life. Last year at the end of the year IEP meeting there were several people sitting around the table (myself included,) with tears in their eyes as we discussed that they have never seen a child progress as much in a year as mine. Never. All because of an IEP and teachers who truly cared about her performance & abilities. I don't mean to be snarky about it, by calling it a learning disability, (I know some of you mom's take serious offense at that,) but ADHD severely (or can severely) impact your child's ability to retain and process information they just "learned." A lot of kids with ADHD need more time to complete the same educational tasks as children who do not have ADHD... relating it to other childhood diseases like asthma or diabetes does the kids who have ADHD and parents / teachers a disservice. Yes, I agree with you, it *is* a medical condition, however, it affects learning / information retention = learning disability. I am unsure however what a Section 504 is, can you elaborate? Also, I suppose the severity of your child's ADHD issues can effect what kind of services they receive, but an IEP is a "must-have" for students with ADHD, in my personal opinion.

Brittany - posted on 09/08/2011

6

30

0

ADHD is not a qualifying condition for an IEP. That is reserved for learning disabilities which prevent the student from making adequate progress or staying on grade level, and things like Autism, Aspergers, etc. ADHD falls under medical conditions, along with asthma and diabetes. It is a qualifying condition for a Section 504.

Brittany - posted on 09/08/2011

6

30

0

Yes! If there is any kind of medical emergency or he has a reaction the school needs record of all meds he's taking. Also, ADHD is considered a medical condition and qualifies him for a section 504, which requires the school to make accommodations for him - this is federal law. You should inform his teacher, the school counselor, the nurse, and school administration.

Beth - posted on 09/06/2011

274

18

67

We tell my daughter's teachers. It helps everyone. We can work together and they can let me know if or when she starts having trouble , when her med wears off, etc. We had an issue earlier this year with her math teacher and I had forgotten to tell her she was ADHD-C. The issue she had directly related to the ADHD-c. With out that extra information she didn't know what the problem was

Janice - posted on 09/05/2011

10

56

0

We have to let the school nurse know each medicine our children is on in case they were to have a reaction so yes I let his teacher know about the adhd and he also suffers from anxiety too and is on medication for that also. But they are also going to do an IEP at school also for the adhd to get him the helps he needs if any.

Dana - posted on 09/03/2011

9

0

1

We do every year. I've photocopied an ADHD pamphlet and give this to the teacher. I believe it's better to be in the know, rather than the teacher thinking he's just a disruptive child. It also helps with the self-esteem issues as his teacher isn't on him/her all the time about behaviour.

Rabecca - posted on 09/02/2011

520

15

70

I dont think you have to tell them but they may already know if its in thier school records . But I think its a good thing to just put it on the table about there diagnosis what youare doing to help meds , therepies and thing like that just so they know you are aware of her struggles in certain areas and what you are doing on your part to help and also it opens up that gateway that if they have questions or concerns they know oh this might be related to his meds or his ADHD and wont weonder should I bring this up because I think as far as teachers go it could be scary to ask certain questions just because you are not sure how they to start the conversation so if you are the one to lay it all out they will feel more comfortable talking to you as well

Tara - posted on 09/01/2011

16

28

1

I think you should tell the teacher because if he acts out in class, they are aware of whats going on.....I tell my sons teachers all the time so they are aware.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms