Teachers and ADHD

Ginger - posted on 02/25/2009 ( 48 moms have responded )

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Any suggestons on how to deal with teachers who deny your child needs any special treatment because of his adhd and continues to punish him. He is in 6th grade and his impulsivity is the problem. Talking a lot and doing anything to entertain himself. I met with the teachers twice and they refuse to make changes and continue to punish him.

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Tammy - posted on 03/02/2009

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Give them information! I get so frustrated when people say that it is not an excuse or they can do better, etc. ADD/ADHD is a DISABILITY!! These kids brains do not work the same as a typically developing child! When will people learn this? It is a disability, but because you can not SEE the disability it is harder for people to understand. Teachers would not tell a child who was in a wheelchair to get up and walk, you can do better. They should not tell ADD/ADHD kids to perform in a way that their brains are not capable of performing.

Maleia - posted on 02/26/2009

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504 plans are federal, so every state has to participate if you can prove your chile meets the requirements.  The principal or vp usually writes up the contract.  If your child's school isn't meeting the requirements set forth in your sons 504 then the school board should be made aware.  It falls under the ADA (American's with Disability Act) and they have no choice but to follow it once set forth.  Good luck.  I've started this battle with my dauthers school and it's an ugly one.  Her teacher is singling her out and it makes her feel bad about herself, be embarrassed, hate school and constantly have stomach aches or headaches.  These teachers should be ashamed.

Bernadette - posted on 02/28/2009

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If the teachers and the school refuse to meet the 504 Plan requirements you are entitled to seek legal counsel and force the school to meet the plan - they are essentially in violation of federal law. Demand a meeting of the special education department and inform them that you will be bringing legal counsel - this typically forces their hand as the principal and the super intendant never want to deal with this. As a teacher and parent I am so sorry that you are facing such irresponsible behavior from educators.

Gwendolyn - posted on 02/26/2009

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my son is much younger, but i will admit we had difficulty with his teacher last year in kindergarten.  at first, she denied he even had a problem... but then once we started getting her more involved with the doctor and providing assessments, soon everything she was blaming on his adhd.  he was popular and well-liked by all the other kids in his class, but she made it a point to single him out, even for normal behaviors all the boys his age were also doing.



 



we had several meetings with her, but we never really reached a satisfactory resolution.  luckily, the principle of the school and the assistant teacher were receptive to his needs and our involvement, otherwise i worry morgan would have felt ostracized by this teacher. 



 



morgan is currently off medication while we fight with insurance regarding what they will cover, but is doing quite well in 1st grade.  he sounds a lot like your son, as his impulsiveness and "talking back" do raise flags with his teacher sometimes, but she is understanding that he is not trying to be rude.  they involve him with extra hands-on assignments, and that seems to help him keep his attention better focused on school.  it's tough, because unlike normal kids where you can promise them a reward if they do or don't do a certain behavior, Morgan will forget about the reward and react quickly to his surroundings... and then feel bad about what he did, because he honestly did not "mean to".  his current teacher is attentive, and i know it is often a matter of keeping morgan busy sometimes so that he does not find his own ways to entertain himself during quiet or down periods.



 



good luck to you.... it is truly tough when you have a teacher who refuses to understand or make even slight accomodations.

April - posted on 02/26/2009

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As far as dealing with the teachers, it sounds like you've tried to get involved.  Writing a formal complaint to the school admininstrators may be a next step.  That might not do much to help your son, though.  I will tell you, on a slightly off topic note, that I teach karate.  I teach a 3-4 yr old, 5-7 yr old, and 8-12 year old class.  Right now, I have about 6 students that have been diagnosed with ADHD.  Their doctors recommended that they get involved in some extra curricular activities that will help them practice their focus, patience, and self discipline.  I've gotten a lot of positive feedback from their parents and teachers.  It helps them.  My 13 year old step-son who just moved in with us has also been diagnosed with ADHD, and he is not interested in taking Karate, so we are considering getting him some extra help from a place like Sylvan Learning Center.  Right now we spend hours helping him with his homework every night.  If you are unable to get a satisfactory resolution at school, you might take a look at some of these other options outside of school.   

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Shellie - posted on 06/20/2011

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I had the same problem, and am still struggling with the school but not as much since I pointed out the fact that ADHD is legally a disability, and that since my son's diagnosis of ADHD is documented, his LEGAL rights are being overlooked. As soon as I used the words "legal rights" and "disability" the principal moved much faster. I got an IST meeting and Behavior Plan in place (which LEGALLY the teachers must follow, as well as bus drivers, etc), and an "Educational Plan" which dealt more with homework and assignments. It is still a never-ending battle but once you have these plans in place, he will be protected.
Good luck,
Shellie

Celtic - posted on 06/07/2011

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You need to go up the chain, keeping records of dates and times, whom you spoke with. Get with your doctor and counselor (s) to write requests. Do they have a school counselor? talk to them as well. Keep pushing, entering the school as you can. Many times they will tell you, you don't need an IEP or 504 because its not a work related problem, it is a behavioral problem. Try not to make enemies but try to educate them on the issues. Get into CHADD. org Sometimes you can hold a meeting using their library to educate teachers/admins about ADHD and needs, not just to your child. IF you become the expert, you can teach to them. Read books on teaching ADHD children and copy excerts from them and ask your teachers to read them. Many teachers only take a course or two, if that, about mental health and children and just don't understand it. Many thinks a magic pill corrects all behaviors. Its hard for a child to not get praise all day at school and not blow off the steam. I have been through the gammet of issues with school admin and teachers, even with M.S.E. LPCC-S licensure. They tend to listen a bit more, but what gets them is you keep adovcating and advocating for your child, Pushing until something happens. You must stand up for your child, as no one else will, but don't let a dx determine him or her to use as an excuse not to get in trouble. These wonderfully gifted children know right from wrong, and must learn, even if inch by inch, right from wrong. ADHD children, when plugged into correctly, are wonderful, gifted, amazing kids. Many, many have went on to succeed in great things due to their lack of stopping at one question, but curiosity that is never quiet satisfied.

Jennifer - posted on 03/12/2009

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The rule of providing services or a way to get to them is supposed to apply to all states. However, I am familiar with one school district in particular who tries to get by with doing as little as possible unless the parents threaten a lawsuit. They think it saves them money. But they don't realize what is is costing the children, and even the teachers. So many teachers really want to help, but their bosses won't give them any support. And if it's the teacher that is the problem, try moving your son to a different classroom. I feel so fortunate that my daughter has a good team of people who are all working for her. I know there has been a lot of advice given, and it is all good. Many of the national organizations are more than willing to help you to build and educate your team, so that your child gets the best education possible while still being able to be the person he is and always will be.

Stacey - posted on 03/11/2009

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I would suggest looking online at www.chadd.org . They are a fabulous resource as far as state laws and advice. I know in California, the schools have to provide appropriate treatment at the school site, or provide transportation and funding for the child to receive help somewhere else.

Cindy - posted on 03/11/2009

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I agree with April.  I would write a letter of complaint to school administrators (and honestly to anyone and everyone who can and will listen) and explain your side of the story.  Teachers are there to HELP our kids not hinder them and that's what your childs teachers are doing.  Your child is being shorted an education because of one "old school" teacher.  Punishment is not the answer to an ADHD child.  However, it is my understanding, that unless there is an "official" diagnosis on record for your sons ADHD teachers do not have to recognize any federal or state guidliness as far as No Child Left Behind or IEP guidlines...

Jennifer - posted on 03/11/2009

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My daughter (now 11) was first diagnosed with high functioning autism, then possibly asperger's, and now ADHD. The thing for all of us to keep in mind is that these disorders are all very similar, and medical experts now classify them as all being on the same spectrum. What this means for our children, especially in public schools, is that ADD/ADHD is indeed a disability classification which can be used for an IEP or 504 program. However, new information comes so fast that many in the education community can't keep up with it. So don't be afraid to inform your child's teacher that ADHD is indeed a disability and that part of the treatment plan involves accomodations in the classroom. And make sure you do have an official diagnosis from a doctor, and not just an "I think he may have ADHD" When the teachers and administrators see that, they cannot deny assistance any longer.

Always remember...no one knows your child better than you do. Never let someone else tell you they think they know what is best for him just because they see him for an hour a day, five days a week, in a high-stress environment. Never give up on your kids, and if the teachers and others at school don't like it, that's too bad. The law says they have to deal with it anyway.

Courtney - posted on 03/10/2009

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Quoting Ginger:

Teachers and ADHD

Any suggestons on how to deal with teachers who deny your child needs any special treatment because of his adhd and continues to punish him. He is in 6th grade and his impulsivity is the problem. Talking a lot and doing anything to entertain himself. I met with the teachers twice and they refuse to make changes and continue to punish him.


In my past experiences, this is a challenge. First of all,  find out who is in charge of special education at your school. You can then place in writing to this person a request to do an evaluation. In my state they are allowed I believe 45 days to complete this. They will then decide if his levels are to where they can give him an IEP ( Individualized Educational Plan) which will list out exactly what they can and should do when he becomes disruptive. Punishment is not the key. My now 8th grader has been thru it all. They continued to tell me for 5 yrs of school he only has adhd. He has other things they discovered by doing this evaluation. These are only suggestions as I do not know your full current situation. But it will be a fight you must be persistant with or you wont get any place.

Brenda - posted on 03/10/2009

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My son is in grade 3 and the teachers do the same thing..What ever happened to teachers that cares and not for their paychecks

Angela - posted on 03/10/2009

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I saw your reply and wanted  to contact you. My sons school claims that ADHD/ODD/CD does not qualify him for 504 program. He is extremly smart according to all the test that were given when diagnosed. His school years have been unbearable with the exception of first grade, that teacher informed me that she had been warned about him and she was up for the challenge.The younger the teacher, the worse it is. This year he has spent over a month straigt in In school suspension, everytime he returns to class they find another reason to send him back. The teacher told him to hurry and get something before he was late for PE so he ran-(What would you do?) I myself would have ran or walked really fast so he gets another 2 weeks for this. I have fought with them until I am blue in the face and have decided that this will be his last year in the school system. I am trying to get homeschooling set up for him because he is hating school.

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My son has been on ADHD meds since end of 1st grade and it made a huge difference. This year he is in 3rd grade and his teacher this year is great. When he gets done with an assignment or test and he has free time, the teacher has brain teasers for him to do ( or any of them if they finish) and he loves them. I havent had any real problems this year but in 2nd grade he would be distracted if he was done and break his crayons, pencils and just do what he could do to entertain himself and always got in trouble. I love this teacher. It has helped alot.

Tara - posted on 03/10/2009

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I have found an organization in my town that helps to deal with the school on issues like this. It is called families helping families and they are going to go with me this week to talk to my child's teacher and make changes on her IEP. Maybe you have one in your area, I wish you the best.

Jennifer - posted on 03/09/2009

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Yes. Get the principals involved. Does your child have an IEP, a 504, or a behavior intervention plan in place? If so, and they do NOT follow it, they are breaking a federal law. Feel free to add me if you wish, or message me or whatever, and I can give you some more info :)

Shelly - posted on 03/09/2009

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Quoting Ginger:

Teachers and ADHD

Any suggestons on how to deal with teachers who deny your child needs any special treatment because of his adhd and continues to punish him. He is in 6th grade and his impulsivity is the problem. Talking a lot and doing anything to entertain himself. I met with the teachers twice and they refuse to make changes and continue to punish him.



I have 2 boys with ADHD.  One in 7th grade (and he is highly gifted) , and one in 3rd grade.   We have had our challenges with both boys.  Our 7th grader is in all advanced classes and has always had straight A's since Kindergarten.  Always.  He has always had some kind of 504 plan in place that was reviewed every year and modified as needed.  But, for some reason, this year, we are having more trouble with teachers, than ever.  It has been a battle, but I won't quit.  We are the only advocates our children have.  I am really trying not to be on the defensive with the teachers, nor do I want to alienate them or cause them to take anything out on my child.  But, I will do what it takes to make sure he gets all the accomodations and assistance he is entitled to.  You need to research and read a lot.  Do not assume that teachers, because they are teachers, know how to deal with and help these kids with ADD/ADHD.  They get a blip of concentrated instruction in this area.  More classes/seminars/conferences are needed in this area for them to be able to truly know what and how to deal with these children.  I have been so irate with my sons teachers before, because of them singling him out, embarrassing him in front of the class for something being late (or using him as an example for others not to do like)  or giving him an F, when he clearly didn't deserve it and had they followed the 504, he wouldn't have gotten it.  They just really didn't get it!!! Then they just tried to get rid of the 504 saying he didn't qualify, etc, etc, etc.  I still battle today.  I have just learned to be my children's advocate.  I keep in daily touch with their teachers(thru email), whether they like it or not.  I even copy in the principal, v.p., school counselor, and sometimes school board members, district superintendent, and the person who is in charge in the district, overall for kids with 504 plans.  I kill them with kindness, offer names of books for them to read, send them links to sites with helpful info, etc.  But, now they know I mean business and won't stand by and just let them do what they want.  I have input in everything.  They cannot ignore me anymore.  I also continue to work with my sons, as they have responsibility in this, too.  They need to understand why their brains are so different , why they are different, and how they can help us help them.



Communication with the teachers and staff is so important.  I love that our school has a parent access website so that we can monitor daily assignments, tests, projects, etc.  It is easier to intervene when things are happeneing rather than after the fact and when grades are all in or it is too late to turn something in late, etc.



You just can't take no for an answer and you can't let them tell you what you have to do if you are not comfortable with it .  I have to keep reminding myself that we are all here for my kid, and it doesn't matter who is right or wrong or who has the best idea, etc, or who is boss.  We should all be there for their best interest and however that comes about, then that is the best way at the time.  It is all about our kids being successful.  Each one of these kids will be successful in their own way.  There is not one blueprint for all.  We have to work together  to find out what works best for them.  It won't happen overnight.  That I know all too well!  Painfully so!  Good Luck!  I have some names of some really good books on ADHD, school, etc, all that have each given me a bit of helpful information.  I always share these with my son's teachers, as well.  Usually, surprisingly, they have been rather receptive to this info.  I think it is all in the way you approach them and handle it. 

Cathy - posted on 03/09/2009

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I recommend that you email the principal, counslor and teacher(s)  to request a meeting. If you do this via email with a read receipt at least you will know they received the request.  When you get a response...make sure you save both your email and theirs or better yet save and print all correspondence. This way you have some proof if they decline to meet with you. If they decline...take all of the information (copies) to the school district's office. Your child's doctor may also be able to suggest other options as well. If you are able to meet take a voice recorder....ask them before the meeting begins if they will allow you to record the meeting. Do not be surprised however, if they say no (you must have their permission to record...do not record with out them saying you can). I also recommend that you take someone with you....even if they are only there to listen the support will go a  long way.



Also, before you meet do your research on 504 plan's, IEP's and your childs rights.  There is alot of information on the web. If you have already done this then take the information with you. 



Most of all stay positive....rememeber your child is worth every ounce of energy it takes for you to do this. You can do it!!! :-) 



 

Susan - posted on 03/08/2009

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Have you approached the administration with this, then?  The teacher is REQUIRED to follow the 504 by law.



Also, you said the meds are helping -- is the dosage high enough?  Have you tried others to see if they work better?  Is there a combination that could be more effective? 



I'm not saying the answer is only medical, either.  Our son finds it helpful to have a snack (especially a high protein one) in the afternoon -- this seems to help him carry through until school is over.



Just some suggestions, but especially follow through with standing up for his guaranteed right to special accomodations with the 504 . . . !

Ginger - posted on 03/08/2009

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Since the guidance couselor is not returning my calls and the teachers are not communicating with me I thought my next step is to meet with the President. They don't want to work with me and follow the 504 plan or make any accomodations because they feel "he can do better if he tries."

Cathy - posted on 03/08/2009

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I have a 15yr old son who was diagnosed with ADHD in Kindergarten and we have struggled every year with at least one teacher who does not understand that ADHD is the cause of him not paying attention or being disruptive.  Or they would believe that ADHD was just an excuse not an actual disorder. We found that a check sheet (found online) taped to his desk would help him to remember the many things he needed to pack up to bring home at the end of the school day (this took some of it off of the teacher and put the responsiblity on him).  When you meet with a teacher have a counsler in the room with you someone who is neutral to the situation.  A 504 and or an IEP might be helpful. Remember you are your child's best advocate and sometime his/her only advocate! Cathy

Lisa - posted on 03/07/2009

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Good luck! I have a 12 year old with tourettes and a 9 year old with ADHD.We have been fighting for the same help and understanding since my oldest was 6 years old.

The best thing to do is go to the top, each school has a person you call call to get help. I can't remember what their title is.

Just keep at them, these kids have only us to support them. I know my school understands that. I will not let my boys slip through the cracks or be "handled" in a way they do not deserve.

I have learned to try and work with the school rather then fight with them. It seems to be better but they also still know if I have an issue with a teacher I'll be there with my questions and will not be happy until it's been solved!

Contact me anytime

Lisa

Debbie - posted on 03/07/2009

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Don't be affraid, you are his advocate. You want what is in his best interest. My son is on the 504 plan. He has ADHD, OCD, and high anxoity. His school distict is awesome. By law they have to follow the 504 plan or risk being sued. You need to again sit down with the principal, vice principal. school consolur, and teacher to come up with a good plan for your son.



Since my son's 504 plan has been out in place Nov. 08, he has been doing so much better. I wish you all the luck.

Nicki - posted on 03/06/2009

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Hi Ginger.  I am a teacher and the mother an ADHD child.  In recent months, I found an all natual product to use with my son so I could take him off Class 2 narcotics.  The doctor approved the switch ,and I have noticed incredible results at school and at home.  I was so pleased, I decided to work for the company part time.  I encourage to you give me a call.  712-255-0378.

Carrie - posted on 03/06/2009

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Call the district or the special ed teacher and ask for an IEP (individualized education plan) My son had a teacher that flat out told me she doesn't believe in ADHD and wasn't willing to help him. With an IEP the teachers and school are mandated to follow it. You are involved in every meeting witch is also very important. With it you have a say. I hope this was helpful

Julie - posted on 03/05/2009

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If you've tried all avenues of the school administration, get a special ed advocate. There are many qualified advocates who know the law in your state and have the power of the law to enforce the accomodations or other recommendations. Cost is likely out-of-pocket (check with your health insurance plan). Might be $80-150 per hour. We had 1 meeting with the advocate and 1 meeting with the school & advocate and got immediate results. Well worth the $$



If the school administration says they can not provide the accomodations or other recommendations in your plan they might be required to PAY for your child to go to a private/other school system that can provide it - the advocate can tell you more about that.



You might want to look into have a neuropsychological evaluation that will provide a lot of insight into your child's strengths and weaknesses. This is something the advocate can refer to and will help build a better 504 or IEP. Talk to your pediatrician or specialist about requesting the evaluation, and check with your insurance on whether they cover it.

Susan - posted on 03/05/2009

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By law the school must make accommodations for ADHD. You'll have to fight for them and fight to keep the school following the accommodations, but do fight.

My son was always in trouble. He skipped 2 grades (from 5th to 8th) and this year has been SO much better for him. He's academically challenged (actually has to fight to make an A), is with older children who are showing him (by example) control and he's learning to imitate them. It's just been amazing the difference. He still takes 80 mg Metadate (40 mg morning; 40 mg mid-day) to help with impulse control, but it's a lot better than it was.

His younger brother takes 36 mg Concerta and his older sister takes 27 mg Concerta. Yes, we have attention issues at our house...

Angela - posted on 03/05/2009

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I saw what you had wrote on a reply in the circle of moms. It makes sense. It seems that no one can get the school system to do what they need to do as far as the children with this disabilty. Do you constantly battle with them? I am to the point I am considering homeschooloing becasue he is in ISS in school suspension most of the time and when he returns to class they find another reason to send him back I might as well teach him at home he is not learning anything there. You dont get taught in there it is all individual study. He has a IQ of 147 and the school is just waisting his intellegence.

Angela - posted on 03/05/2009

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I am going through this same battle and have been for the last 4 years of my sons education. We have changed schools so much. We moved into a small town outside our area hoping that the smaller classroom whould result in more bearable circumstances for both the teacher and our child. NO! The school system is a joke. The so called professionals simply find a way out so they dont have to deal with your child. Let me guess, not a day goes by you are not called or getting letters for paddleings or detention and maybe even suspension. Im there. It takes you making alot of fuss and doing alot of research and getting the right people on your side. I have battled constantly with them about making the proper accomodations to meet his needs and the school refused to follow up. Contact your dr and ask them to write you a statement to have your child put on a behavioral plan and an individualized educational plan that best suits your childs needs. By law they have to meet the requirments. Do not allow your child to be punished in the school, I made that mistake and the drs recently told me no more. He is not learning becasue he is never in the class. he is eaither sent home or in the office or in detention room. Belive me I am making alot of noise right now. You will have to do the same. Reading what others go through and what they do in the circle has been helpful to me. Good luck

Brenda - posted on 03/04/2009

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My son is 13 and has ADHD, we are currently battling with his Math teacher as well.  Luckily he has a great support group from his counselor, Assistant Principal and the Special School District.  We have taken our problems to all of them and have told them what our concerns are.  I would take it above the teachers head, to the principal, to the Special School District and he should have a case worker that knows his case.  I am not sure what it is like in every state.  The program that they have here is IEP and it is updated constantly to make sure that he is getting the best services as possible.  I would check with your school district and demand that this get taken care of!!!

Tricia - posted on 03/04/2009

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I would talk to the school counselors and the special education group at your school. No, your child probably doesn't need special education, but they can be involved to help. In my sons's case, we're thinking he may have Asperger's, along with ADHD. He was diagnosed with ADHD two years ago, but no concessions were ever made in regards to the school. Now that that AS is a possibility, the Special Education Coop is involved and they'll be running their own tests with my son. I have verified that even if no one confirms he has AS, they know there are issues and it will be addressed. Go above the teachers. Talk to the principal and the school counselors. While no child should be special treatment, your son's needs have to be met with an IEP. Hope that helps.

Elizabeth - posted on 03/04/2009

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I have found that teachers are often the first to diagnois a child with ADHD but are the last to know what to do with the kids. We struggled for the first 3 years of schooling. We ended up moving schools (they say he was not elligable for IEP because he wasn't under doctors care for ADHD), in the building fighting to get the teachers to be consistant with him every 5-6 weeks. We decided to put him on meds at the start of 2009 after we realized his personality was changing almost to the point of being depressed (he is 9). He is on a low dose that only last 4 hours in the morning (he is borderline ADD). That seems to give him the boost he needs and his grades are even starting to improve. I know how you feel fighting to get what your child needs. Don't worry about being over bearing or offending. That is the schools job. At least you have the law behind you. Use it! My guess is that you will only have to play "hardball" once then next year the teachers will see you coming! LOL

Lanny - posted on 03/03/2009

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I know in my state (Wisconsin) they have to recognize his disease. I have not run into this problem but every year within the first three weeks of school I schedule a meeting with the principal and all of his teachers. I lay it out this way, either we can work together or they can do an official IEP accomodation plan (this is the law!). They are always very supportive to work together because an IEP is a pain in their but! My expectations are not that they let him slide on everything but that they do accomodate some of the normal behaviors of adhd. Impulisivity is a big component and we work together to come up with solutions. Maybe he needs to sit somewhere else in the room, or by different people. Meet with all of your childs teachers again, with the principal present and go in knowing your childs rights under the law. Come up with some acceptable ideas to help him, then bring him in to the room and make sure he understands that he is going to be held responsible for xyor z. Make sure he knows that there are options for him when he is unable to concentrate. I never expected them to just ignore Cole's behavior but to help him become engaged. I also requested help for an hour after school where he stayed after and worked in a "homework" space. It was so sucessful that they extended it to any child. They had the special ed teacher assistant monitor and be there to help when they got stuck but they worked alone at a table in the lunch room. As far as I know they are still doing this. It really helped Cole because he was fresh from school and knew if he could get his work done he was home free once he got home. To this day he tries to get all work done at school because homework is such a nightmare, his meds wear off about 4:00 and I didn't want to extend them. I hope this helps, these teachers can not do this and you do have legal rights.

Stephanie - posted on 03/02/2009

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Perhaps he is not being challenged enough. I am having the same difficulty with my son. He gets bored because it is either repititous material or it's just something he is just plain not interested in learning. I have met with the teachers and principal on a couple of occasions. My son has a difficult time completing homework neatly. I warn him that when I check it over if it's not neat he will redo it, and he claims to understand but yet he still hurries through it and then gets upset with me for making him redo it.

Chrissie - posted on 03/02/2009

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we have been luckly, my son is still undergoin tests (hes 5) 2 c if he has adhd but the school has been brillant, we have worked all together and he gets alot of support and help from the school and health professionals - its sad 2 hear that hes not getting the support he requires from the school n i hope you r able to solve your problem.

Allyson - posted on 03/02/2009

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NEVER be afraid to offend them! Their job is to help kids, not ignore them when they need a little more help. And the fact of the matter is, what I have learned in this, is kids with ADD/HD learn much different than other kids.



It also doesn't help that the school system in California is having kids learn things two and three grades above what we learned in school.



I wish they had a school just for these kids. It would help so much.



Because they are not stupid, and they realize they have learning and sometimes social issues that other kids don't. Then their self esteem is bruised.



 

Ginger - posted on 03/02/2009

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Thank you for all the comments and suggestions so far! It is a relief that I am not alone with these problems! I am getting him involved with an afterschool program besides the boy scouts that he is in. I think it will help. He has become less entertained by things at home. I have been working with the guidance counselor and she is supportive but dragging her feet at getting anything changed. My son has five different teachers this year in sixth grade and it has been a challenge. I totally agree that his year can be good or bad based on the teachers personality and whether or not they like him. I have told all the teachers about his ADHD but they don't want to make his diagnosis his excuse and say he can do better! Should I give them some information about ADHD? I feel they should already know all about it since there are so many kids with it. I'm afraid to offend them.

Allyson - posted on 03/02/2009

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Oh my gosh, that sounds like my son about 4 years ago.



Jared is almost 12 now.  I didn't know what was happeneing because my younger son has ADD also, but he didn't have anger like Jared.



He was finally diagnosed as having ADHD. He has been on concerta for about four years, and it has done wonders for him.



I know a lot of people are against medication, but for me, it was that or my sanity. Not to mention, it hurt him as much as me when he would get in trouble, especially at school.



I mean it became an every day thing, I was afraid to pick him up, I would get an upset stomach about a half hour before it was time.



Jared still has moments here and there, but it has helped him mentally, because he feels better about himself, and socially because he doesn't fight with everyone all the time.



Good Luck!



Allyson Gray

Allyson - posted on 03/02/2009

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Oh my gosh, that sounds like my son about 4 years ago.



Jared is almost 12 now.  I didn't know what was happeneing because my younger son has ADD also, but he didn't have anger like Jared.



He was finally diagnosed as having ADHD. He has been on concerta for about four years, and it has done wonders for him.



I know a lot of people are against medication, but for me, it was that or my sanity. Not to mention, it hurt him as much as me when he would get in trouble, especially at school.



I mean it became an every day thing, I was afraid to pick him up, I would get an upset stomach about a half hour before it was time.



Jared still has moments here and there, but it has helped him mentally, because he feels better about himself, and socially because he doesn't fight with everyone all the time.



Good Luck!



Allyson Gray

Christina - posted on 03/01/2009

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Go to the administator, explain what is wrong and how you expect it to be handled.  Also speek with your childs Dr. he/she may have some other options.   For years we had problems with my son and his teachers.  I have always been very open with teachers about his diagnosis, I let them know rigth away when there has been a med change and what might happen.  There have been times when I had to go to the administator, ,and they took care of it right away.  Good luck!

Carrie - posted on 03/01/2009

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no but i'm having the same problem. my son is in 2nd grade and he has 1 stike and they say 1 more and he is out of school. i'm about ready to homeschool him i can not stand his teacher.

Tammy - posted on 02/27/2009

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I have an ADD 4th grade daughter, and I have found that your childs success in school depends entirely on the type of teacher that they have. The teacher has the ability to make or break your experience. Last year was terrible, and now this year with our 504 plan being followed and a teacher who understands and respects children with ADD, my daughter is receiving straight A's and has now been placed in the advanced learner program. I hate for this year to end, because then we will start all over next year with a new teacher. As far as the 504 plan goes, it is a legal document that the school HAS to follow and if they do not, there can be legal consequences. You should go above the teacher, the principal, and contact your school districts person responsible or in charge of the exceptional children department. If that fails, go to the school board. It is your legal right have this plan followed. Good luck.

Gwendolyn - posted on 02/26/2009

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Yes, i completely agree!  Extra-curricular activities are a great way to build esteem and keep them busy, while also teaching them new coping skills.  My soon took karate for a couple of years, but now his greatest joy is his piano lessons.  He would get bored between lessons last year, and started "fiddling around" on the piano... so now his teacher is helping him learn to WRITE music!  I am so lucky to have found such a creative teacher who works so well with young kids (Morgan just turned 7 this past fall).

Ginger - posted on 02/25/2009

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There is a 504 plan in place and the teachers are not following it. My son is on medication and it helps a lot but not enough to keep him from getting bored at school.

Christina - posted on 02/25/2009

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I have a 6th grade son who did the same thing. I am also an elementary teacher- I refused to medicate my son in elementary school, but when it hit middle school- things changed.  It was a TRAGIC experience to do any homework at night with him, mostly math.  We had opted to NOT medicate all throughout elementary school.



Our nights at home as a family were unbearable!  A 15 minute math assignment would take us all night, literally.  It was putting a HUGE burden on my husband, our 2 younger boys, and me.



We tried nonmedicated for a 9 week period of middle school. We decided to give medicine a try for one 9 weeks to see if it made a difference.  AMAZING and unbelievable difference! 



Do the behaviors occur at certain times of day? or specific classes?  In Kansas we have something called a 504 for children with special needs.  If the school and teacher refuse, you might research what kind plans your state has for children with special needs.  If a plan is put into place the teachers are REQUIRED to follow it, whether they like it or not.



If your son is not on medication, you might visit with your doctor.

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