Is autism hereditary?

Clair - posted on 05/29/2010 ( 15 moms have responded )

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I have an autisic child and i worry about how he will fit into society as he grows up, wll he be able to get married, have children or will he pass on he's genetic disorder, leave home and lead a normal life. Many post are for younger children im just wondering if there are any mums out there with older children/adult who could shed some light into my question.

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K - posted on 09/01/2010

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I am not a big fan of blaming vaccines, especially due to my personal experience with my kids. The Dr. who started the whole "blame the vaccine for autism" craze was debunked as a fraud. Autism is just better diagnosed perhaps, after all communication and understanding are the hallmarks of life today, 60 yrs ago they would have been in an institution. My one dd was clearly spectrum from the day of her birth, she came out crying and didn't stop for several years....her sensory problems were horrible. My other dd was normal in every way, it wasn't until after she had rotovirus at 18 mths that we noticed some subtle changes. It is an emotionally charged issue, and hopefully scientists can figure it out and stop the fear mongering that exists out there.

Tammi - posted on 07/22/2010

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Look up Temple Grandin..she is wonderful and answered many of my questions.She is autistic and fully functioning.We should still raise our children with the same goal as the rest...to live life ti its fullest and help them become self sufficient and succesful in life and to love themselves and never put any limits on what they can accomplish.Autism is a part of who they are and should never define them as a whole.So to answer your question just do as much as you can possibly do to help your child learn to live with it through therapy.it has done wonders for my son.

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Mark - posted on 01/14/2014

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There are both genetic and environmental causes to autism (according to the US Centers for Disease Control). Women need to reduce the environmental risk factors to have healthier new children. Check out Dr. Debby Hamilton's new book Preventing Autism & ADHD.

Amanda - posted on 11/16/2010

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my kids are both very young. but my son was just diagnosed with autism at 2 and a half i in NO way blame vaccines. he was showing signs before he got his vaccine. My daughter is now 14 months and I'm starting to notice signs of it in her as well. my cousin from my dads side is serverly autistic. so I beleive in my case its mostly genetic.

though i did her an interesting quote a while ago. I beleive toxins in the envirnoment play a part. but the saying goes: "genetics are the bullets in the gun and the environment pulls the trigger" in other words. the genetics set up for the possibility and any environmental issues like some illnesses, toxins, etc can cause it to come out.

Lynn - posted on 10/24/2010

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Have you watched the movie Temple Grandin ? it is set in a different time and all spectrum children are unique but similar its quite an interesting movie and is more focused on her teen to adult integration to society ! Your not alone i worry too , every day " smile "

Tara - posted on 10/04/2010

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My son is 18 years old and Autistic. He is graduating from high school this year. As far as working in the real world, yes he will be doing that. I am hoping that he can live on his own with his home having modifications. I don't know if he will ever marry, he really not into that at this time. I do believe that autism is the cause of different things, it is just the way a certain person reacts to different things like in the enviroment, or if its genetic or maybe the shots or everything. Good luck to you and yours.

Dina - posted on 09/19/2010

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I have a 4 year old who is Autistic and I have 2 uncles who are also autistic. So I think it might be..... No neither one of them is the father of my child I still believe that it is genetic. I think that It doesn't matter what the relationship is... Your child could grow up and have children and never pass it on. Same as many other genetic disorders.

Abigayle - posted on 09/01/2010

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I remembered your question and ran across this in a presentation I am researching and preparing for with the school principal and superintendent...I just happened to glance and thought you might like this information:


The model that we developed and continuously refine the process of human development: Genes and nutrients interact to enable a single cell to multiply and differentiate to form multiple cell systems and organs, each with their own specific functions. It is the continuous interaction between the genetic code and nutrients that grows a human being in the womb and early years; and maintains optimum health and function throughout the lifespan. The following is an outline of some of the most common mechanisms implicated in the aetiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder:

* The Genetic code may have flaws. While there is a genetic component to Autism, genetics alone cannot explain the recent rise in Autism in industrialised nations.
* The cell membrane that protects each cell is less than optimum, leaving it vulnerable. There is much support in animal and human studies that a reduced intake in Omega 3 fatty acids results in impaired cell membranes and Neurodevelopmental disorders.
* Antigens (foreign toxic matter, heavy metals, viruses and bacteria) attack vulnerable cells and damage them, resulting in cells that cannot carry out their function normally.
* Antigens can damage or change the genetic code in the cell, and when the cell reproduces itself it does so with the changed code leading to dysfunction in future cells.
* There is emerging evidence that a dysfunctional methylation system may result in abnormal genetic expression leading to dysfunctional cells. Vit. B12, folate, B6 and Magnesium play a central role in regulating Methylation.
* Abnormal methylation can damage metallothionein protein which regulate zinc/copper ratios and other metals in cell membranes.
* Impaired cellular structures can result in multi-systemic disorders, affecting gastrointestinal, Immune, endocrine and central nervous system.
* The delicate balance between beneficial and detrimental bacteria in the gut can be upset by antibiotics, food preservatives and other environmental toxic additives, leading to a condition known as intestinal dysbiosis.
* Opportunistic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract may irritate a vulnerable gut wall resulting in irritable bowel syndrome, leaky gut and food sensitivities.
* Some bacteria can produce amines. When these bacteria are overgrown, they can produce large amounts of amines. Amines are known to have receptors in the same areas in the brain as neurotransmitter receptors. This can result in a scrambling of brain signals by amines.

http://www.adhd.com.au/Autism.htm#1.%20C...

K - posted on 09/01/2010

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Wow, that is insane that a Naval base is subjected to that. Very sad. I have taken charge of my kids vaccines and delayed them or refused to have multiple ones done on the same day. I find it just too overwhelming for their little bodies.
When my oldest was a baby she was perfect in every way, and now she has a bunch of physical issues and the Aspergers......it just makes my head spin how that could be. Best to you and your journey with this and everyone of course.

Abigayle - posted on 09/01/2010

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I def. don't necessarily believe the vaccine caused my son's Autism but my child aside from crying and colicky was also in a very high pesticide infested area. Sprayed directly over the naval base daily. But when he didn't become delayed at all until he regressed to no speech after his two year old vaccinations I am also not ruling them out. Unless they prove otherwise; while all my children are vaccinated. When at six they decided to come out with a second dose of a chicken pox vaccination and they all had been exposed multiple times and no one contracted it...I chose to not put the un-necessary risk, and discomfort and highly anxiety induced, sensory induced hell on my son. That was my personal choice. My nephew was delayed from day one, and had all symptoms imaginable from infanthood...so I again don't "blame" vaccines either. I just think that as responsible members of not only society but of an Autistic community it isn't ruled out yet; so some children may have been affected that way. No family history at all with a disorder of that magnitude so I truly respect your opinion I just am a little more close to that situation I suppose.

Abigayle - posted on 09/01/2010

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Autism has genetic components yes. It can also be enviornmental. We have no family history of Autism but my son and nephew both in utero in Lemoore CA with pesticides and my son was not developmentally delayed as my nephew. My son started talking and got vaccines (that I will still fight against any that are not necessary for him) he stopped talking and regressed. So I did look up that online and its not always hereditary.

Lisa - posted on 07/25/2010

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no one can tell me if autism is hereditary but there are 6 members of my family with autisim but it didn't show up in genetic testing but it must be it's the only explanation

K - posted on 07/15/2010

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When we first started our journey with autism, the OT/PTs said they saw a distinct pattern of birth related incidences and children on the spectrum (my two spectrum kids did:one was induced and one had to be intubated right after her birth, my 3rd child had no complications and is completely normal). If you look at the rate of inductios and cesareans in the US they go up similar to the incidences of Autism. With that said, I have an uncle who would have been considered on the spectrum and two cousins that are too, so there is a family history (Genetic testing shows no Fragile X or the usual genetic markers). From my hubs family, he has several siblings who show signs too.....wondering if the two of us were just a time genetic time bomb. Then you have those who suspect environmental factors.....we try to eat organic and as whole as possible, but you can't avoid all the toxins in th envoronment these days.

Beverly - posted on 06/04/2010

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My 14 yr old was just diagnosed PDD. He has had a rough time of it, as he was mostly misdiagnosed while with his father. However, he has made great leaps since we found out how to help him. I believe he will grow up to fit in mostly with society. Will he be normal? Maybe , maybe not, he was helped late.



I also have my 3 yr old who has been diagnosed with Aspergers. He was caught really early, and we expect him to even be integrated into normal classrooms soon.



I have a 10 yr old with ADHD / ODD, and a 5 yr old who is fine. My youngest child right now is 7 months. I have them watching him closely in case he starts to show signs like his older brothers, as I have also heard it can be hereditary. I however will not worry much, as even though I have 2 out of 4 children who are, I have 2 who are not. Is Autism hereditary? Maybe the chance is there, but as with a lot of things, I think it is a hit / miss situation. I honestly think that it is all a timing thing with how soon it is caught and helped, and worth the risk :)

Ilene - posted on 05/31/2010

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My ASD kids are quite young (3 years old), but I will do my best to answer the question of 'is autism hereditary'. There are several genetic links to autism specifically. There are also a few genetic conditions that mimic autism (i.e. Fragile X).



There is quite a bit of evidence that autism DOES run in families. There are also trends in families with autistic children among family members who are NOT autistic in the choices that they have made.



Personally, this is not something I'm too worried about right now, nor do I think it will be a concern down the road. I know several autistic adults who are living perfectly normal lives, and there are others whom I have known since childhood whom I now suspect are on the spectrum -- they are happy, professional, in many cases married and parents. Autism is not something that should guarantee a limit to the ability to live one's life. It's always there, but those who are affected find ways to "fit in" and determine their own road to happiness.



This is my own philosophy, and I hope one that I will continue to have as my twins grow older.

Lisa - posted on 07/25/2010

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no one can tell me if autism is hereditary but there are 6 members of my family with autisim but it didn't show up in genetic testing but it must be it's the only explanation

Beverly - posted on 06/04/2010

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My 14 yr old was just diagnosed PDD. He has had a rough time of it, as he was mostly misdiagnosed while with his father. However, he has made great leaps since we found out how to help him. I believe he will grow up to fit in mostly with society. Will he be normal? Maybe , maybe not, he was helped late.



I also have my 3 yr old who has been diagnosed with Aspergers. He was caught really early, and we expect him to even be integrated into normal classrooms soon.



I have a 10 yr old with ADHD / ODD, and a 5 yr old who is fine. My youngest child right now is 7 months. I have them watching him closely in case he starts to show signs like his older brothers, as I have also heard it can be hereditary. I however will not worry much, as even though I have 2 out of 4 children who are, I have 2 who are not. Is Autism hereditary? Maybe the chance is there, but as with a lot of things, I think it is a hit / miss situation. I honestly think that it is all a timing thing with how soon it is caught and helped, and worth the risk :)

Ilene - posted on 05/31/2010

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My ASD kids are quite young (3 years old), but I will do my best to answer the question of 'is autism hereditary'. There are several genetic links to autism specifically. There are also a few genetic conditions that mimic autism (i.e. Fragile X).



There is quite a bit of evidence that autism DOES run in families. There are also trends in families with autistic children among family members who are NOT autistic in the choices that they have made.



Personally, this is not something I'm too worried about right now, nor do I think it will be a concern down the road. I know several autistic adults who are living perfectly normal lives, and there are others whom I have known since childhood whom I now suspect are on the spectrum -- they are happy, professional, in many cases married and parents. Autism is not something that should guarantee a limit to the ability to live one's life. It's always there, but those who are affected find ways to "fit in" and determine their own road to happiness.



This is my own philosophy, and I hope one that I will continue to have as my twins grow older.

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