My daughter has had 2 Grand Mal seizures 8 mos apart, should I start her on seizure medication?

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Drewin - posted on 02/26/2009

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Personally, I would ask for a referral to a neurologist before making any decisions on meds. Antiseizure meds can carry tremendous side effects. My daughter had her first tonic clonic at 3 mos and her ped put her on meds that evenrually almost killed her. (Needless to say we got a new ped!!) These meds must be very closely monitered by a physician who is very familiar with these meds. If you come to the conclusion that meds are appropriate, do your research and work closely with your doc. As the previous poster said, go with your instinct. If you feel the course of action one doc has given you isn't appropriate ask for that second opinion. Good luck!

Cori - posted on 02/25/2009

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Our daughter was diagnosed as having epilepsy when she was 4. She had her first seizure which was really bad, but after an ambulance ride & a night at our local Children's hospital, the next day we were able to leave with our own doses of Diastat (rectal gel) to keep on hand in the event she had another seizure that was 5 minutes or longer. So, we changed some simple things, such as carrying it with us & wearing a watch at all times. She had her second seizure 3 weeks later - only lasting 2.5 minutes. She was at the sitter's house, which scared me, but we had a plan. The sitter would call me when it started & I would time it while she helped her through it. It worked & everyone was fine! But, our ped neurologist instructed us to come back for tests. EEG, MRI, etc... her wave activity was off, so we discussed medicating her. We did go ahead & start her on Lamictal - which is a wonderful new drug for seizure control. It comes in a small pill form that is chewable for kids. We followed orders & so far she has only has a few minor bouts of shakes. We also felt bad looking back, she had "staring spells" & we thought she just didn't pay attention. Of course, we learned those were absent seizures. The great thing we have found is that she doesn't seem any different than any other kid - she still takes her gymnastics classes, reads chapter books with ease (1st grader now), & when she's seizure free for 2 years, we will titrate her off her meds & do more tests to see if she has reached her goal. We were told that she will probably grow out of it. Have faith - follow your instinct on medicating vs. non-medicating - mothers know best. But, you really should have your child checked out by a pediatric neurologist. Good luck, hope all goes well & let us know if you need anything!

Tracey - posted on 02/22/2009

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Hi again Brandi,



As Sian mentions in her comment to you, there is a reason why your daughter is having seizures, though the exact cause is not always found right away.  And although some people only have their seizures every few months or sometimes even every few years apart, doesn't change the fact that your daughter is having these seizures.  Also, you're saying these seizures involve convulsions (tonic clonic) & therefore usually medication is a consideration at this point.  Seizures can start at any age.  And when seizures are not  being caused by something specific such as; a brain tumor, a stroke, diabetes, a blood clot, etc. then professionals will put a term called "Epilepsy" on a patient who is having seizures.  The definition of Epilepsy, without getting into a ton of scientific terms, simpily means someone who has a seizure disorder.  Since there are over 40 types of seizures, Epilepsy is the medical term given for people who take various types of seizures, at various ages, and there is no stipulation on how often a person has to be seizuring to be considered as having a seizure disorder.  Sometimes a person will have one seizure and never experience this again, this is not Epilepsy.  It is usually after a second seizure when professionals start to look at why this is happening.  Sometimes seizures will start in childhood (as early as birth) and then stop completely once a person reaches adulthood.  Others start seizuring later in life, sometimes after having children, or even as late as the senior years.  Some people will do extremely well once they find the right medication for their type/types of seizures while other people will never be completely controlled due to the type and/or where the seizures are stemming from in the brain.  But all in all, you probably shouldn't rule out getting further tests done and finding out as much as you can about what is going on & hopefully, why.  This could be very important to your daughter's future health and well being.



Best Wishes, & Good Luck!



Tracey Alderson

Sian - posted on 02/22/2009

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My eldest daughter was diagnosed with epilepsy in oct 2007 after having 2 grand mal seizures and is now on medication. There are many different reasons for having seizures not always associated with epilepsy. She doesn't have them regulary and sometimes there can be months apart but it would be wise to talk to a professional about what your daughter is going through. My daughter also has what are called absent seizure where she drifts off for a few seconds in the middle of watching television or a conversation. That could also be something to look out for. For months I thought my daughter was just ignoring me when I called her name or asked her a question. If you don't get offered tests for your daughter then ask to be refered. even if she doesn't suffer from then on a regular basis then medication can build up in the system and stop her from having them. I don't know how old your daughter is but there is a reason for her to be having these seizures and it would be worth checking them out with your doctor/physician. Good luck and take care

Tracey - posted on 02/21/2009

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Hi Brandi,



A grand mal seizure, also known as a tonic clonic seizure, is a fairly serious type of seizure and if these seizures were diagnosed correctly then I might be questioning the physician on why they aren't starting meds?  Was he/she a specialist or a general practitioner?  Usually after a second seizure a physician will start an anti convulsant medication (and it won't necessarily be phenobarbitol).  Are there other conditions surrounding this that are causing professionals to hesitate starting meds?  Also if you haven't already seen a neurologist, I would ask to be referred to one.  These are the people who have the knowledge and can determine what needs to be done from this point on, if anything.  They also will order tests such as an eeg to read brain waves and an MRI which is a special xray that can see deep into the brain and will rule out clots, masses, etc. that can sometimes be the cause of seizure activity.  Believe me, I don't want to scare you, the tests I mentioned are only precautionary measures.  But at the same time they can tell the specialist alot about where the seizures are stemming from in the brain which will help to determine what type of medication your daughter should be on if it is necessary.  Unfortunately, sometimes further precautionary measures fall by the wayside, therefore you will be the one having to push for more tests and ask more questions.  Good luck and take care!



Tracey Alderson



       

Jayde - posted on 02/20/2009

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hi, my name is jayde i just gave birth on the 4th dec 2008 and my lil one had a clot in his brian that caused seizure, so he went for brain surgery and still has fits, but the medication yuo want is phenabaratone, read up on it carefully, it is an abused drug but it is the best for little babies... it stops the seizures and your little one at bay till the doctors can properly asses them... so ask your doctor about it... cos siezures for little one can be very dangerous...

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How old is your child? Have you discussed this with your physicain?



I have grand mal seizures too, so I know where your coming from.

Laurie - posted on 02/20/2009

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have you tried talking to a physician? there are so many types of meds for different types of seizures

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