Always on the look out for books for precocious 9-yr-old reader. High school level reader, but emotionally immature

Gretchen - posted on 02/28/2009 ( 6 moms have responded )

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He loved Harry Potter, Dark Materials, Inheritance Trilogy, Lemony Snickett, Percy Jackson, Graveyard Book, Holes, The New Policeman, Hunger Games, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Nation (& the rest of Pratchett's YA novels), Inkheart books, etc...

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Just read a fantasy series by a guy named Brandon Sanderson...he is a professor at a very conservative university so true to form it is very CLEAN....but it is a book intended for adult readers.  Some swearing maybe, but no sex.  THe series is called "Mistborn" and there are 3 volumes.  His first novel was called Elantris and was also clean.  (And very interesting...I seem to be in the vanishing category of adults who prefer books that I don't have to worry if my kids pick up. hehehe)



Also I recommended another series on one of the threads..the first is called "Last of the Sky Pirates."  There were a good many of those as well.  They are intended for younger readers, but are deliciously wierd with very cool artwork.



Ulysses Moore books are also pretty fun, but might feel a little light for him.  It would be a quick read. k. hartvigsen



 

Morag - posted on 03/01/2009

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The Hobbit (which always leads onto Lord of the Rings eventually) and the full Chronicles of Narnia, although when Aslan told Susan and Peter they could never go back to Narnia Tia bawled her eyes out and at the ending of the final book too... but thats good because it is sad, however, not in an adult way. Oh and A Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy :) I read that when I was 9 and I loved it.

[deleted account]

One book that has stuck with me since childhood was Izzy Willy Nilly, rather than give you what I thought about it I'll just post the synopsis, I just know that it's one that really stuck with me, I was between 8-10 when I read it also.



Grade 6-9 Before, Izzy's life had been colorful as a pretty, popular cheerleader, but grayness swallows her up after a car accident results in the amputation of her leg. Her trio of girlfriends are too uncomfortable to be around her, but the void of their friendship is filled by unattractive, blunt Rosamunde, who bounds into her life, providing bolstering support. It's Rosamunde's persistence that helps Izzy over the hurdle of returning to school. Several expedients effectively convey Izzy's stages of reaction: the miniature Izzy visualized in her head that does back flips expresses her true feelings; the way denial is demonstrated by Izzy not looking at the empty leg space until 30 pages after the doctor tells her he has to take it off; the cool reserve of the black therapist which makes her "examine" herself. As with other Voigt characters, the perspective is from within. Readers see the mental anguish and self-pity through Izzy's eyes. Consciously, the pace is slow, as is the healing process, and the tone is ponderous throughout. The story is about learning to balance: physically as Izzy maneuvers herself on crutches and emotionally as she sorts out her friends and a new self-identification as Isobel. Work on the school paper, the prospect of a prosthesis and Rosamunde's staunch support start to mend her crippled life. No one will be able to finish this story without understanding the psychological trauma an amputee faces. The message is not Willy Nilly.Julie Cummins, Monroe County Lib . System, Rochester, N.Y.

[deleted account]

How about Artemis Fowl, and books from Lloyd Alexander like the Black Cauldron series? He might also try out the Tolkien series.

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