Anger and Frustration Issues

Deborah - posted on 11/29/2008 ( 36 moms have responded )

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I am at wits end with my highly gifted 4 year old son. He has always been extremely challenging and has had a ridiculously intense desire to control his world (if not the world). He's always gone through phases where his behavior takes a turn for the worse, and then he usually cycles back around once he's mastered whatever developmental leap he was dealing with. But for the past several months, he's entered this new place where he's really having a hard time controlling his anger if he doesn't get what he wants. His emotions are so intense it's completely exhausting, and I never know what's he's going to be like from one day the next.

I have theories about what could be causing this... everything from the recent developmental leap of tapping into his emotional world he's opening up to (he's never expressed much empathy and is in a school that is using the Second Step empathy curriculum) to the fact that he reads at a third grade level and has an insatiable appetite for information all while still having the emotional maturity of a 4 year old.

Theories aside... I'd love to know if anyone has dealt with a gifted child who has sometimes intense and out-of-control emotions (including frustration and anger)? Any ideas or words of wisdom to get me through this?

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Angela - posted on 01/05/2009

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Rebecca: I think it's wonderful that you have the insight to reflect on your own childhood and your issues with your strong sensitivity.  I, too, recognize some of my children's freak outs as all too familiar with what I was like as a child and a teen, and was not offered any guidance as to how to deal with my strong emotions.  Having highly charged children has huge pluses I think for the long run, but can be exhausting and frustrating in the day to day living when they are young.  I always tell people.. my children (and as babies too) yell and cry the loudest, but they also laugh the best too.  There is never a dull moment in my house to be sure.  Side note: My 10 year old son saw me writing on this board and asked me what it was about.  I told him and he laughed.  He knows he is different from other kids somewhat, and thanks to hours of long talks about his emotions, etc, he is ok with it and I have definately seen an improvement in his coping abilities.  The biggest key has been getting him to talk about what it really bothering him, and us talking it out.  Sometimes that same conversation has to be revisited over and over again (even for days) before he can "move on" and let go of what is bothering him.  I worry about mental health issues, since there are relatives on both sides with Bi Polar disorder.  I wonder.. how much can I influence whether or not he will need treatment in the future by my actions today? I have to assume I can make a difference. Anyone else also have this concern?

Melody - posted on 01/04/2009

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Deborah,



My 5 yr old son who is PG went through this very same thing. Sadly, this is not a phase, the only way my son has gotten control over this is by us not feeding into his frenzy of rollercoaster emotions... You will find that with these special children, no ONE thing works, you try one mode of discipline for a few days (or hours), then have to switch to another mode only because they have already quickly figured out ways to bypass your new method of parenting. Check out the Love and Logic principle. It is has worked the longest for me, a few of dvd's that gives you a kenw way of thinking... but, it too also waxes and wanes... I used to put my son in time out in his room with the door shut and tell him to come out when he is ready to be nice and not "hurt" our ears. That still works for me. Instead of punishment, let them have some control. When they are in control of when they can come out of their room, they don't feel like pushing the envelope any further... there's no fun in that for them. Remember, it doesn't have to be punishment, since these outbursts aren't usually because they are "being bad". I think they just have so much pent up energy that they HAVE to release it somehow. I would put him in his room and tell him it was okay to read or play with toys if it would help him come out quicker. Also it's all in the delivery too. Don't engage into their battle. That helps too.

Sonja - posted on 12/09/2008

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Our sons teachers and pediatrician helped us and out son to use his "brains" to help control his behavior and emotions. There are some good books out there for kids to help learn control strategies ("how to take the grrr out of anger" and "what to do when your temper flares" were good ones for us). If you look on Amazon, they will say it is for an older child, but a gifted 4yr old would likely be able to use it. We used them with our son at 5. The temper flares book was better for a younger child, I think. They talk through cognitive behavioral approaches to control of emotions. We did also do OT with our son which was very helpful as well. Doing biofeedback or working with a child psychologist might be good as well, we didn't try that.

Sarah - posted on 03/04/2014

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Could some of these issues be related to anxiety? Diet may help. Eliminating artificial colours flavours additives such as msg and identifying any food intolerances may reduce aggression anxiety and intensity.

Rebecca - posted on 01/16/2009

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i don't get what's so shocking about that - we do the same thing. it allows them to have their own emotions, but they must learn to deal with them themselves -- i am really surprised because it is basically a time out --- just without moving them to any specific place.

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Maryjo - posted on 11/06/2013

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Angela, there is nothing funny about this. Parents know when their kids truly feel it and when they are being drama kings/queens. I know of kids who are not gifted and spout this to get attention. Many gifted/highly intelligent people have chemical issues and their emotional sensitivity in much more intense that other children. My son is one of them and often, says it's the worst day ever and he wants to kill himself. I can see it in his face when he gets off the bus. The worse thing you can do with a child who is truly feeling this way is laugh or undermine his feelings. It makes the child feel even more worthless and they will hide it. You should be a teacher at a large public high school for several years and you will come in contact with teenagers who commit suicide or try. Everyone will say "Gee, we never knew he/she was feeling so badly."

Amanda - posted on 01/30/2013

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I am having this same problem with my 6 year old. He is in kindergarten and has been tested for the gifted classes. He wants to do something and if it doesn't go his way he gets really frustrated. One minute he is fine but if something gets tough he gets angry. Nothing is ever his fault and blames everyone else. My husband and I are getting really frustrated with him and his arguing with everything we say to him. He has a 2 yr old brother and gets easily aggravated with him if he won't do what he wants. Need ideas on how to help him overcome it.

Kat - posted on 01/16/2009

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i want to thank you all for your posts on this topic. it's helped reassure me that my children may just be normal [for gifted kids, anyway] after all!

Jody - posted on 01/16/2009

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My daughter would do this when she wa sin 4th grade and couldn't get a Math question right. She's extremely gifted in Math, so not knowing something frustrated her to no end(even now and she's almost 14) We used to argue back and forth and it would make me SO MAD because she didn't want my help.



She did that at a young age like your son, and what I used to do is simply walk away. If he hasn't got an audience and he hasn't got someone to observe his emotional meltdown, he'll get over it faster. People would be shocked when I would say to my kids "Go away. I'm not speaking to you until you can talk to me the way you should talk to your mother." And turn my back and busy myself. It would make her madder at first, then she learned it is easier to ask questions and not act out so much.



She still has a heck of a temper, but nothing like she once did!

Jeanne - posted on 01/16/2009

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I'm so glad to have found this forum! Thank  you all for contributing. Just this morning I met with my 6 year old's teacher to talk about how to handle his anger outbursts. Thanks to this discussion I had some good ideas to contribute. The teacher said the books "Mad Isn't Bad" and "How to Take the GRR out of Anger" sound like good books for the school library and she'll try to get them acquired. After hearing about my son's specific anger incidents, it seems his big trigger (besides lack of sleep) is feeling like he's wrong and/or not being taken seriously. I gave the teacher some advice about how to validate his feelings while not necessarily giving in the facts, which I've found to work at home. Also there can be delayed gratification; if he demands to be heard but now is just not the time, he could write a letter.



 

Angela - posted on 01/16/2009

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Erin: That's great!  I'm so flattered you took my advice and I'm glad your son is getting something out of it too.  My kids really liked the kid with the flames coming out of his head when he is angry.  I think the text is honest with kids, and honest about how kids can retaliate without thinking of the consquences.  Gifted kids know that so many children's books sugarcoat reality.  Best wishes to you and your son.

Juliet - posted on 01/16/2009

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I have three children and one who is considered gifted (although I think they all have their own unique gifts). My son has extreme bouts of frustration and anger to the point where he is often unable to reason with. One day when he was calm, we talked about his outbursts (he's six) and we decided to come up with a 'code word' that I need to use when he is being unreasonable. When I say that word, he has to check his behavior. It doesn't always work but it does sometimes do the trick. I also separate him from me and any othe family members when he has these outbursts....he seems to get over them more quickly without having others to feed off of his negativity. Hang in there...it's better now that he's six!!

Kelly - posted on 01/15/2009

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Very interesting w/ the "worst day of my life" and saying they're going to kill themselves. My 8 year old is my "drama king", he is gifted and has ADHD. Everything is always so much worse than it really is w/ him. I'm glad it's not just him. We just take it one day at a time w/ him, and remind him that we love him. He is just so emotional some times. 

Erin - posted on 01/13/2009

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Quoting Angela:

I bought a great book for my son who has an anger problem (that has improved a great deal slowly over the last two years... but still present). It's called "Mad isn't Bad". I think it helped him to have some advice on dealing with his anger in a postive way that wasn't coming from me. Patience.. and you should remember that mad isn't bad too! It's how they deal with it that they have to learn.. and sometimes learning their own triggers can help. After all, you aren't always there for these special ones to smooth it over.


I just wanted to say that because of your post I bought "Mad Isn't Bad" for my son and he loved it!  We read it that night before bed and immediately he wanted to write out his own list of "Good Ways to Let Out Anger" to refer to when he has a problem.  It was great!  Thank you for recommending it!  :o)

Kylie - posted on 01/06/2009

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I have dealt and am still dealing with these issues with my children and have found the following 2 books fabulous both as a parent and looking at my self - "Tricky Kids by Andrew Fuller" and "Raising Your Spirited Child: A Guide for Parents Whose Child Is More Intense, Sensitive, Perceptive, Persistent, Energetic by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka".



They both help you feel so much better about having children that are MORE of everything.

User - posted on 01/06/2009

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Oh my gosh, we are dealing with the same things with our 5 year-old girl.....she is very sensitive so there are times we have a gentle, understanding approach and there are times when she uses it to get what she wants and we use a more corrective approach, like time out. We do the same things you were talking about. Sometimes I think our daughter is the only one like her in the world, but thanks to you all, I can rest easy. And rest easy in some of our approaches because it's all such trial and error! Anyways, thank you.

Rebecca - posted on 01/05/2009

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Well, regarding my own mental state I have no concerns as several psychiatrists have said that I am the most sane person that's ever consulted them :P and that has put my mind at ease with regard to my daughter. Regardless, treatments for mental illnesses are getting more sophisticated all the time, and there is plenty of evidence to suggest that suitable emotional interventions have plenty of impact.

On the nature vs. nurture debate, my two year old (despite going through typical toddler stuff at the moment) is way chilled by comparison. It's hard to know how much of her chilled behaviour is down to the fact that I am much more confident and experienced in dealing with her, and how much is inborn personality traits. Instead of melt downs my two year old has perfected the blank stare as a form of resistance and I haven't a clue how to deal with that...

Rebecca - posted on 01/05/2009

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p.s. to some extent i see my daughters dark imaginative play as playing with her emotions and seeing what she can do with them. after a bored kid bout of really bad behaviour towards us with this aggro attitude, i decided that her 'punishment' was to go to the bathroom, stand in the full length mirror and say those things to herself and see if she liked it.

she did it for about 30 seconds and got bored, realised it wasn't as funny or acceptable as she thought it was, and found something better to do with her time.

Rebecca - posted on 01/05/2009

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Thank you for the book reference. Will definitely see how I can get a copy to South Africa. It sounds like it will not only help my daughter but also myself, as I also suffer from emotional highs and low which were treated by my parents with extreme abuse.

I want to teach my daughter skills I was never even taught. Because I do think you can learn emotional management if you are equipped with the right skills.

I think all of us have battled in one way or another at developing particular emotional skills. And there are some we are still grappling with, which makes passing on such skills to our children all the more difficult.

I think the model of we want for our children is very different to the model our parents had for us. So many of the issues we are grappling to address regarding our children are very different from our parents generation. So we have to learn how to be more innovative in our approach. As a society as a whole we have so much more insight into our children's psychology.

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I feel your pain. My son went through a "phase" of emotional turmoil that stretched from about age 2 until the end of 4th grade! He was fine in school, but at home he'd have explosive emotional episodes that had me at the end of my rope (along with the rest of the family!)

Like so many other great parents here have reminded you, try to remember that your son's wonderfully gifted brain may be highly developed in academic or artistic areas, but that does not necessarily apply to his entire brain. In fact, many gifted kids are slower to develop in other areas (or perhaps seem slower because the rest seems so mature). With my own son, I noticed a particular difficulty for him in "changing gears" that would lead to explosive meltdowns. It was not until a friend recommended a book she'd found that we discovered a way to help our son develop his impulse control and emotional management skills, I'm not one for parenting books, but having been down this road with my #3 kiddo, I can HIGHLY recommend "The Explosive Child" by Dr. Ross Greene. The lights went on for me when I read his book. In fact, he even used the same type of language to describe the behaviors we were dealing with. While your son, like mine, may not have the most severe problems Dr. Greene describes, I found Dr. Greene's techniques to be invaluable in helping my son, and perhaps it will help you as well.

There's a lot of good advice on this forum, and a lot of other caring moms here to support you. That will help. But most of all, remember that NO ONE knows your son better than you do. And keep in mind that giftedness is inherited. When you really delve into all you DO know about your son, and focus in on that, you will discover the techniques that work for YOU. It's exhausting, but very rewarding to solve these behavioral puzzles our gifted kids throw at us.

I hope it gives you some encouragement to know that the same little guy who gave me so much trouble has matured into a wonderful pre-teen who copes so well that his struggles aren't perceptible to anyone outside the family. He has mastered his emotions the way he masters everything else. It may take a LOT of work, but your son will master his emotions too. You just need to find the tools to help him cope until his emotional brain can catch up.

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Hi, Deborah! I'm new here and your post is the first I've read and, boy can I relate! My daughter's 15 now. Michelle Metzler's post suggesting the 1-2-3 Magic program is the ONLY thing that finally worked with my daughter... and every adult that was in her world was part of it. She still has total meltdowns, even at 15, when something's too hard for her or she doesn't understand something. Once she gets it though there's no stopping her. I ended up homeschooling her for 1/2 of grade 5 and all of grades 6 & 7 because the school system couldn't handle her. She's successfully reintegrated into the mainstream high school system but it's still a constant battle trying to keep the school staff educated about what works for her. I'm so excited to have found this group!

Michelle - posted on 01/04/2009

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Another good strategy is 1-2-3 Magic. There's a book and videos. This is a simple stratgey, but when used consistently, it works really well...with all kinds of different issues. I use it in my classroom and at home.

Melody - posted on 01/04/2009

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Erin Thomsic,



Is switching schools or homeschooling an option? My gifted psychologist says that these highly gifted/profoundly gifted children are either fully engaged where they are less aware of what is going on around them to getting in trouble all the time because they are screaming out for help. Help for more mental stimulation. It's not a conscious thing they are doing, it's just acting out from the frustration of being so unstimulated... Some have actual sensitivity issues. I would try contact eh SENGifted website and see if there is a knowledgeable pyschologist in your area to help you find the right place for your son. K12.org is a homeschooling website that is available for enrichment.

Rebecca - posted on 01/04/2009

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just reading the 'emo' comment about the five year old who threatens to kills themselves -- i am finding at the moment that my daughters previously highly amazing imagination seems to have shifted to an exploration of more macabre topics and a focus in her imagination on a lot of the crap that she sees in the world. my husband finds this quite worrying. i am not so sure -- is the exploration of the dark shadow side of life necessarily bad? ok, its shocking to see in a five year old, but that to me is because of our preconceptions about childhood. my husband finds it distressing because he imagines he can create a 'happy' child. i hope instead to find a way to simply use ALL emotions constructively...

Rebecca - posted on 01/04/2009

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my daughter is five. and i am dealing with much the same issues. yesterday we planned to take her to the ballet, but we could only by tickets on the day so that my MIL could access the pensioner discount. unfortunately, the tickets were sold out -- i knew before it happened that she would have a total melt down. i dealt with it by affirming her emotions and saying: 'we are all disappointed' - i find that naming her emotions does seem to help calm her down to a place where we can actually discuss things. on the other hand, sometimes i do use time out when i think she is deliberately pushing the limits emotionally to get attention.

not every situation is the same, so you may need to try a range of diffferent strategies.

i am a roller coaster of emotions my self and i am still learning how to deal with my self in these states ... so it is really hard to deal with her at times.

my own mother says i am 'over sensitive' and punishment was severe; i also think my daughter is a bit highly sensitive, and i wonder if that isn't actually part of her gift - BUT the question is how to teach use of this extra sensitivity in a way that is constructive, rather than the total loss of control that tends to arise...

Angela - posted on 01/02/2009

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Oh Mikie!! I just burst out laughing when I read your comment about your son saying he is going to kill himself several times a week! I can relate so much it's just so funny! My son says its the worst day of his life at least several times a week, and like you said.. it's a trip if you can relax on the ride.. and know that having lots of drama kings/queens in the house makes life fun (and they all get A+ in drama! lol)

Angela - posted on 01/02/2009

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I bought a great book for my son who has an anger problem (that has improved a great deal slowly over the last two years... but still present). It's called "Mad isn't Bad". I think it helped him to have some advice on dealing with his anger in a postive way that wasn't coming from me. Patience.. and you should remember that mad isn't bad too! It's how they deal with it that they have to learn.. and sometimes learning their own triggers can help. After all, you aren't always there for these special ones to smooth it over.

Mikie - posted on 12/18/2008

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This might sound a little odd but I'm a gifted mother of 4 gifted kids and I've dealt with a lot of this. I was diagnosed as bipolar about 10 years ago (if you look at the symptoms it makes sense) but I'm just sensitive to a lot of things. Too much sleep, not enough sleep, not enough exercise, not enough sun light, too much junkfood, not enough food, too much noise...I've noticed that the bad days tend to happen more frequently for the kids when something isn't right. I've been unmedicated for 5 years and I'm doing fine. I'm not against psychology. I just think it's too easy to throw chemicals at a problem.
That being said, I have a 13-year-old son that feels compelled to argue with adults and have the last word. And a 5-year-old son that thinks he's an emo teenager who get's all upset and threatens to kill himself several times a week. Gifted kids are a trip if you stand back and don't take it all too seriously.

Sonja - posted on 12/10/2008

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My son's school did a behavioral plan with him and he got rewards there like lunch with the teacher or going to the library on his own. Do you have a school psychologist that can do an eval and help the teacher with a plan? It seems like the reward should come from the environment where the behaviors are occuring. It started in kindergarten and now in second grade he isn't on any as he has done so well. Obviously he can (and must) learn to control his behavior, so the "I can't" is just an excuse. Some things area easier for some kids (like reading) and some things are harder (like staying in control). Talking through that and explaining that this is something he must learn (along with the books previously mentioned) really helped for us.

Erin - posted on 12/09/2008

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Do you have any suggestions for handling anger and impulsive behavior in a school setting? My gifted 6 year old son has been getting in trouble at school on a daily basis. Specifically, his teachers tell me he is impulsive, doesn't keep his hands to himself, gets frustrated when the other children don't catch on as quickly as he does and yells at them, doesn't follow directions, and fails to produce quality work (meaning - doesn't "show his work" on paper - just the answer - or rushes through things so quickly that his work is sloppy looking). I have dealt with his anger issues since he was a baby learning to crawl. He used to smack his head on our hardwood floors if he couldn't get to the toy he was trying to crawl to. At 3 years old he threw a chair in his daycare class or would "growl" when he got upset. At 4 he trashed his room when sent there for a "time out". Some days he's the sweetest kid, but other days...look out! I've watched him mature more emotionally since he turned 5, but I see these types of outbursts still happening occasionally and usually when he feels stalled in a task he has already mastered and gets bored. So, on one hand, I am trying to emphasize to his teachers that he needs more challenging work (he was tested last year in kindergarten and is supposed to be getting "talented and gifted" assistance in reading and math in his 1st grade class. Reading is going incredibly well, but they have not yet moved forward with higher level math for him. He tells me he hates school, he already knows the stuff they're doing, he wants more challenging work, and he's bored. All expressed by him. I am positive this is the main cause of his behavior issues at school right now, but on the other hand, I also think he has some underdeveloped emotional controls that I don't know how to help him with. He constantly says "I can't help it. It's just the way I am." Personally, I'm not sure how much I believe in "I can't help it."

I have decided to try a reward and consequence system with him since he has responded well to this type of thing in the past. His teacher sends home a behavior report every day including what color his "ticket" was on. Green means no issues. Red is principal's office and there are varying degrees of color in between. For now, the plan is that if he can go 5 days in a row without "flipping a ticket" (changing color) at school, there will be a reward (more allowance, dinner at favorite restaurant, more time on computer, a new book, etc.), but if he has more than 2 days in a row with flipped tickets at school something will be taken away (video game, open gym night at gymnastics, allowance that week, etc.). And maybe 5 days in a row to maintain "green" status is an unrealistic expectation to start with. Maybe we start at 3 and increase it as he improves. I'm still deciding what would be best.

I am curious to see what you other moms think of this idea and if you have any other suggestions. I will do whatever I can to help him get focused and control his behavior. I want to stay away from medications for as long as possible. There has to be a non-medicinal approach out there that works! The last thing I want is for the school to label him as a trouble maker and ignore his academic needs based on that assessment.

Michelle - posted on 12/09/2008

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I have three children, 9 (girl), 7(boy), and 5(girl) who are all gifted. I certainly encountered some of this with my girls...Strong Willed Child...but nothing compared to what we've gone through with my son. 1st...it is getting better as they get older. As they mature, they practice what they have already been taught about how to manage their emotions. I think some of my son's issues were that his mind thinks mathematically. So if you put in certain variables, the same product should come out every time....that's not how people work, so when he didn't get the result he expected so to say, he didn't know how to handle it. For instance, if he was kind to someone, they should respond kindly...which doesn't always happen in a kindergarten class.



2nd..I have to remember that these are my children...my gift from God, who intrusted me to take care of them. I know what is best for them. My son was throwing a fit in the grocery line once and I appologized to the woman behind us. She put her hand on my shoulder and said, "Honey, Never appologize for your children." That just brightened my day. I worry so much about manners and looks I get from other people sometimes that I forget that my son needs me only to love him & I don't need to worry about what is socially acceptable...he is learning social skills, they are just way below his academic skill levels....but he wont be throwing fits in college (hopefully!). :) As long as progress is being made, we're on the right path...one day at a time.

Deborah - posted on 12/08/2008

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I wanted to thank you all so much for your feedback and advice. It is so helpful to know others have been in the same boat, and I agree with what many of you have said about just accepting this is who my child is and knowing that it's going to be difficult and being okay with that. We've been going to family counseling, which has helped immensely and have been reinforcing the things that he can do to help himself calm down when he starts getting angry or frustrated. We've also discovered that he is feeling very lonely and when other children don't want to play with him he's taking it all very personally, so I'm feel sure that this is part of what's behind his outbursts. Thanks again for the support!

Kat - posted on 12/02/2008

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I can sympathize. I have three children all of whom have gone through this in varying degrees. It can be hard because is so many ways we perceive our gifted children as older than their physical age since they are doing things beyond their years, but emotionally they are not as mature. Try to remember that he may be able to do things way beyond his years, but is still only 4 and they aren't easy to predict and still unable to control all of there emotions. Just remind him you love him, tell him what is acceptable in your household, and come up with a coping mechanism for him that works (breathing deeply when he starts to get mad, hitting a pillow or yelling into it, etc..) Gifted children need to be challenged, but they also need to learn good ways to blow off stream. I have (when my child is calm) sat down with them and explained everybody gets frustrated and mad and that part of growing up is learning how to control ourselves. Sometimes all you can do is tell them you love them, remove them from the situation, and let them calm themselves down. The biggest part is not rewarding the behavior, make sure you stick to your gut and don't let his emotions bully you. Smart kids figure us adults out quickly, make sure he isn't playing you and take a deep breath. Teaching your child about his emotions is just as important as anything else and it is sometimes the hardest thing we have to cope with as a parent. I wish you patience.

User - posted on 12/02/2008

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Hi Deborah, I'm afraid I don't have much to offer you except that I am going through something similar with my daughter who is 5. She, too has intense feelings and outbursts of anger. These seem to come at times when she is feeling more out of control and she tries to control everything around her. I am always exhausted and always feeling like I am not doing a good enough job, otherwise why would she be acting like this? I am considering an occupational therapist to help with strategies for her. She will not take advice from us (I think due to wanting control), so perhaps someone else who has more education in this area can help us. My husband would rather us work on it, but I am so tired and feel like I need help. Again, I don't have much to offer but I wanted to tell you that you are not alone, keep plugging away, and be sure to take time for yourself because these kids take every ounce of energy we have!

Christine - posted on 12/02/2008

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My oldest son is almost 6, and what you describe is exactly how he has been since he was about 2. The behavior cycles, the anger, the control issues. You have to understand that this is just a part of who he is, how he was made. With my son, I try to redirect him when he starts getting emotional. Taking his attention away from the trigger can help a lot. His school teacher suggested that we teach him to read music and play an instrument, or teach him a foreign language, to keep him engaged. He has really taken to sign language. Really it's just been learning to love him for who he is and not let his little quirks get to me.

Charlotte - posted on 12/01/2008

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Take a breather! I have a gifted girl, who graduated high school a year early. I can tell you that it is not easy (still isn't). Take a breather when he gets into his "moods", I believe it is because everything seems to come so easily to them and when they cross paths with a task that is not easy, they can't handle it rationally. When my daughter was in kindergarten, her teacher warned us that she would push herself to excellence and for us to not push her. Boy, was she ever right. She hit the proverbial nail on the head with that one. You have to keep him challenged, keep pushing his intellect at home, and stop when he's had enough. I hope you are able to find teachers that push him too. Good luck with your son. I wish I could say it gets easier..

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