I have had enough of child care centers calling themselves schools when all they are are overpriced babysitters! I am looking for a great

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hehe thanks :D



I love teaching him - it's actually like I am just along for the ride of what he discovers, but what an awesome ride it is...

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Quoting Mauranne:

I think parents sometimes make the mistake of assuming that formalised or structured education is the best that there is for young children. This is not the case, as has been proven by the vast amounts of research carried out on children aged 0 - 5, whether gifted or not. All young children, regardless of their abilities, learn most through a personalised curriculum, with 80 per cent of each day's activites self chosen by the child, and supported by a qualified, experienced Teacher, Nursery Nurse/Assistant and/or Classroom/Teaching Assistant, who will ask open ended questions, allow the child to problem solve, create and be in charge of their own learning. The other 20 per cent of the day, each child should have the opportunity to take part in more directed or adult led activities. This is the ethos of all good Early Years establishments in the UK, and in my Nursery School, which is in an area of high unemployment and deprivation, all the children make excellent progress and love coming to school



you described the way I "teach" my son - and I am not a qualified anything... :)

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This is why I chose to keep my son at home with me at first. Didn't trust that at "School" he wouldn't just be babysat... I do get that it's not an option for everyone though.

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Morag - posted on 03/08/2009

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I have to make a choice. Either I send my kids to state school and they eat and have a roof over their heads or I home school them from a cardboard box on the street with empty tummies. Its just not a viable option for a lot of parents. It was never an option for my parents but while they sent me to school, they paid for extra tutors to come in every week to help me advance further because by the time I was 6 my maths skills already out-stipped theirs and I needed further tuition.

I've looked into special Montessori schools for Lil miss. They are just too far away for her being only tiny (an hour and half by school bus). Plus the school system here will move kids up and down the grades regardless. Which I am hoping will happen with lil miss. :) But I also will help to teach her as much as I can at home after school.

Lil miss is currently attending a nursery school but not for education benefits but for social benefits and learning social norms. Even then they've moved her up. I know how antisocial I am, and I attended school. I know however, how antisocial I get the more time I spend on my own and while I enjoy it, I know how awkward I would have been if I hadn't gone to school. It taught me to deal with people, well ignore them mostly ;)

Lets face it the best form of education is for the child to have a highly qualified teacher of their own in an educational centre where they can choose play with other kids their age or not. Thats just not feasible for everyone. Think we have to do the best with what we have and try and make up the difference either by teaching ourselves, getting help, moving up grades, sending to specialized schools and so on.

Ellen - posted on 03/07/2009

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I just wanted to add my 2 cents worth. My family can afford to go to one income so that I can home school. I am also a certified teacher (currently Special Education and Language Arts after April 4 Math and Gifted). When we entered public school with our son we were extremely disappointed in the services he received. It was nothing like what we experienced as children or what our friends were experiencing with their children. It has been a long strugle, but through many (and by many I mean daily contact for almost 2 years) meetings the public school has become a partner in our son's education. We had to explain our philosophy, what was expected, and their legal responsibilities to meet our expectations. There were also plenty of professionals who would help us find a means to the end we needed including istrict level professionals, doctors, school board members, etc. No it wasn't an easy journey, but we're there. In that time I looked at private schools, home schooling, and even this charter school that is part home school. Most days I wanted to give up and home school. I was upset at the sitution - really really upset! In the end we chose to continue in the public education setting. It was more about being part of our community and raising awareness of the needs of gifted through our circumstances.



Though out this my husband was running for school board. Over and over again we heard parents talk about how the public school was not meeting the needs of their children and that they were searching or using other methods of education their children. It was hard to hear as a teacher in our district, but worth it. Children across the board were being neglected by our education system and we were considered one of the best in the area. These stories were brought to the attention of the superintendent and the school board. They are working within their means to fix the problems, but one of the things that needed fixing was philosophy on education. It's talking time, but I'm starting to see the effects on my campus as itcomes down from the top.



Where was I goin with this? Throughout my journey (battles) I have a friend who chose to do the charter / homeschool thing with her daughter. I am glad for them because it's what works for their family. What I'm not glad about is how the dynamics of our relationship changed. No matter what we're talking about this situation comes up in the conversation and she ridicules me for continuing to use the public education system. I don't think she's aware of her word choices, but they are harmful. She is basically accusing me of failing to meet my son's needs by keeping him in public school. What she fails to understand is that his day at school supplements what we teach him, and not the other way around. He learns so quickly that we can get through a ton of stuff through our normal inquisitve view of the world around us without having to formalize everything. School is the "extra" for us. They expose him to things here and there and as long as he no longer tells me that he feels tortred in his day we're on the right path. He is learning there, but it's more about citizenship.



Long story short. We each choose the educational path that we feel is right for our children. No one way is the answer. (though I would be all over a voucher system here!) No matter if you choose a daycare that matches your expectations or a montisori that matches it's all about you and your child. Our daughter goes to an early childhood center because we did not want a daycare environment and we were intimidated by the montisori schools around here. They are TEKS based for preschool and kinder so I trust them to meet the academics, but they have the same fundamental beliefs we do (it's at church), and trains our children with the same morals and values we hold. You are the center of your childs world and they will follow your lead. Choose someone who supports that.

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I apologize for the unimplied sweeping statement. I have friends with children in both public and private school that are great parents, involved parents, and supportive parents. Our society, however, has the standard that "you have kids, you put them in school" without exploring other opportunities. Most are away from their parents for up to a third of the day, or more; with all that time under the authority of someone else, who may not share your values, ethics or integrity. I understand the affordability argument too, and yes, one can homeschool on one salary, though the latest and the greatest "stuff" may have to be postponed, schedules may have to be juggled, the vision of the perfect house going by the wayside. Not required, but possible. To sacrifice this for your children is worth it. Giving up something you value for something you value more: your children! True, many children can thrive in whatever school you may put them in, but for those looking for an alternative, those who are unhappy with what is offered (as in the posts I responded to) or those facing specific challenges, homeschooling is a great option that should, in the least, be explored.

Deborah - posted on 03/07/2009

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"Why give your child to someone else to raise when all children really want their mommies?"

I have read all three of your posts and all with this comment in them. I am all for homeschooling and if you love it and can afford to do it then I think that is great. But comments like above are not necessary. When someone sends their kids to school public or private they are NOT giving them to someone else to raise. This comment implies that the parent drops the kid off at school and has nothing else to do with them. There are great parents in all aspects of the education train. Very active parents who advocate for their child(ren). In that same spirit... there are questionable parents in all aspects too including homeschooling. I realize you love your chose and I think that is great and by all means celebrate it but do not assume those that don't chose that path or bad parents and leave their kids to be 'raised' by others.

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Michelle, have you considered homeschooling? No matter what your education, your little ones will flourish under your care! There are homeschooling groups all over the country so you can get support for yourself, hook up with friends for your children, go on field trips and learn together! It is great for only-children or siblings. It is so easy to start if you just live your life, bringing your little one alongside you and then moving into more sophisticated teaching as they grow. Why give your child to someone else to raise when all children really want their mommies?

Tammy - posted on 02/25/2009

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I have A BS in Child Developement and was a pre school teacher for many years.  I did not like my Montessori school cause they had a too rigid definition of the right and wrong way to do things and tended to "teach to the test"  but that might have just been the school I taught in.  I had a real incident happen when I was student teaching that really reinforced the idea to ask children to explain their thought process and how they came up with an answer.  I had just administered a standardized test that had children group the three things that belong together.  There was a boat, a car, a truck and an apple.  The correct answer according to the answer sheet was of course the car, truck, and boat are all moods of transportation so they belong together.  A little girl picked the boat, the car and the apple and as my instructor told us to I asked her why she choose thoose three.  She said "well apple, starts with A boat with B and car with C, ABC thoose go together!"  Was she wrong, not in my opinion.  When I became a director of daycare center I tried to hire teachers that understood that children think differently and thinking outside of the box is great.  Standardized tests just do not do justice to our kids so  for a school that lets children think outside of the box and are flexible would be my advise.

Mauranne - posted on 02/21/2009

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Hi Lauryan, you are qualified, in the sense that you have a good mother's intuition for what is best for her child. Well done you, and keep up the good work!

Gigliola - posted on 02/20/2009

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I am a teacher and have taught in a traditional classroom setting, montessori setting, and now in a school who works on individualized instruction.  Each child learns in its unique way, their is no guarantee that becuase they are gifted they will definetly excell in any program. I have encountered gifted students who as someone else posted, became bored, completed tasks before the rest and was not challenged enough in a montessori setting. If you are looking for a good program look for a school that will individualize the curriculum for your child, that will build according to their capacities and will continue challenging them. Where I am currently working, I have students in 4th grade working on a 7th grade reading program. The problem with most programs is that they teach to a group not to the individual student. Many teachers dont want to take the time to differentiate and chanllenge those that can give a little more, they rather make one lesson plan for everyone and not have to incorporate different strats or ideas for the advanced students. I've not only seen this as a teacher but as a mother of a highly gifted 9 year old. I have faught with more than one teacher because of this (even teachers in the gifted program)! Only this school year has she had a wonderful teacher who differentiates even in a gifted setting and has challenged my child to the max!



 

Mauranne - posted on 02/20/2009

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I think parents sometimes make the mistake of assuming that formalised or structured education is the best that there is for young children. This is not the case, as has been proven by the vast amounts of research carried out on children aged 0 - 5, whether gifted or not. All young children, regardless of their abilities, learn most through a personalised curriculum, with 80 per cent of each day's activites self chosen by the child, and supported by a qualified, experienced Teacher, Nursery Nurse/Assistant and/or Classroom/Teaching Assistant, who will ask open ended questions, allow the child to problem solve, create and be in charge of their own learning. The other 20 per cent of the day, each child should have the opportunity to take part in more directed or adult led activities. This is the ethos of all good Early Years establishments in the UK, and in my Nursery School, which is in an area of high unemployment and deprivation, all the children make excellent progress and love coming to school

Teeuwynn - posted on 02/18/2009

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My just-turned 4 year old son has been at a Montessori school since he was 1 1/2. He did very well in the Toddler room (although he got bored towards the end), but he has really struggled this year. He says he "hates school," has been acting out and doesn't want to participate anymore.

Montessori is flexible in some ways, but they do want children to treat the materials in the precise way they believe they should be used. I'm wondering if that is part of his issue with things. He wants to be with the 6 year old boys in the class, but that can be hard socially.

I worry what to do with him because I ended up refusing to go to school regularly after kindergarten and was frustrated and had to learn on my own for the most part until college. It wasn't fun.

I talked to another friend of mine who had the issue of not wanting to be limited to using the Montessori materials the way the school wanted and not liking it. Still, I see some moms here saying its been good for their kids.

We haven't officially had him tested, but he did do the Peabody Passive verbal test as a 3 year old (as part of a study he was in) and scored in the 96th percentile. I really want my son to have good feelings about school and be engaged -- instead of shutting down.

Does anyone have any advice or insight for me?

Deborah - posted on 02/18/2009

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Most Montessori schools are great and really allow the gifted child freedoms to explore but if you do go with a Montessori school do not assume they are all equal. Asking probing questions is key. I have heard some horror stories from parents with highly gifted kids. Yes kids could advance to the next project but Montessori schools can have a ceiling on that since they get grouped in age groups. So what if your 3 year old has maxed out all the projects in a subject for his/her age group? Does he/she get to move on or have to weight until they are the right age for the next age group? Some Montessori's don't allow children to move on and they have to wait.

Also, there is supposedly a check list. And Moms with kids in Montessori school please correct me if I am wrong about the check list. For children to move on to the next project in the subject they have to do the easier things first and get checked off. This is really a hardship for some Highly gifted kids since it might mean going backwards and slowing them down OR such as reading, it could really hinder them if they are forced to do phonics when a lot of highly gifted kids memorize words instead of use phonics when first reading.

And again ... the majority of Montessori schools are flexible and work with the parents and children but there are some that aren't and with the popularity of this type of school more and more parents are signing up. So I just want to pass on the information in case you are looking into Montessori ... just be sure to ask propping questions.

Amanda - posted on 02/18/2009

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We had a hard time in child care center with our son.  We chose a Montessori school for him and he thrived!  It was costly, but was the best choice for a child like him.  I would definately look into one of these in your area, especially for a gifted child.

Ellen - posted on 02/17/2009

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Most of my friends have chosen montisori. We chose the one with our church after seeing that they are real similar to montisori and they work with us to meet the kids needs. They are allowing me to put my now 3yo will be 4 in the fall in their kinder class. She won't be 5 until May.

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