Looking for Homeschoolers of the Highly Gifted...

Angela - posted on 05/15/2009 ( 31 moms have responded )

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Any homeschooling moms out there working through the challenges of the highly gifted? Would love to get to know you and trade "notes"!

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Sheri - posted on 07/26/2009

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Hi! I have 3 highly gifted daughters and use the K12.com curriculum. They are available in every state I believe. It is a public school so it is free! Very easy to use. Students work at their own pace! Also, If you are having trouble you can always call a tutor!! www.clubztutoring.com has in home tutoring at a reasonable price!

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Marie - posted on 10/04/2011

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Have not had little girl tested, so I can't say if she is HG, but there is a general agreement that she is 'something different'. We have been homeschooling her since she was 3, about a year now, and she is almost to the end of the Kindergarten curriculum and 'all over the board' in everything else she is interested in. I have no idea what we are going to meet up with if we decide to send to her to a preschool or have her tested for K soon. I'm not looking forward to it, as I don't want her to feel 'different' all of her life... We are also living in a very rural area (miles from any neighbors) with one vehicle and my full-time schedule being unpredictable. Homeschooling would be 'convenient' for us, but unsure if it will be best for her. Getting social interaction for her would be something to work on. Right now she spends all of her time with adults (us and her grandparents) and has gotten better around other children but still is unsure what to do with them - expects them to act like adults. But, she is getting better at adapting to 'child-like' play and running around crazy with them ;) It is an interesting time for us. Hope to hear from you!

Jerin - posted on 10/30/2009

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I have 4 homeschooled children. My 11 year old is working with a program that will verify that his work is at a high school level and issue credit. My middle ones are also academically gifted, but more laid back about it. They're each working about one grade level ahead of where they should be in most subjects (more in others). My little one is starting to be more driven, like her oldest brother -- insisting on a large quantity of work at a quick pace. We're well into first grade level stuff, and she wouldn't go to K until next year.



My older two went to a public school magnet program for a couple of years in middle elementary, but the differentiation wasn't anywhere near adequate for them, and so they're both happy to be back home now, learning at their own pace again.

Amy - posted on 10/20/2009

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We have officially homeschooled our dd, almost 8, for going on 3 years (she's in grades 2,3,4 respectively). It has been a joy and a challenge. We recently got confirmation that she is dyslexic and dysgraphic. The writing was the real sign. Hard to diagnose when they are reading at grade level or above...no one believes you. lol

We put her in PS for pre-k, but after spending the year fighting the system decided that my energy was better spent on educating her and not being aggravated that she wasn't being educated.

I don't really use a curriculum (other than for math). I find it's better if I just make sure we are covering all the topics we are supposed to for that grade level and then upgrade the depth of the information as needed. It can be a challenge making everything exciting and fun -as repetition is evil in my daughters eyes - and I don't always succeed.

Good luck, hope it's a wonderful journey for you!

Amy in OKC:)

[deleted account]

Hi! We've been unschooling since birth our two children, daughter, 12.5 and son, 10.5. Our biggest challenges are meeting their social needs as, despite our large homeschooling community, as both are very mature and socially adept.



Amy in Maine http://onbradstreet.blogspot.com/

Cathy - posted on 10/02/2009

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Hi, My son is 3 and a half and just got the confirmation that he is gifted with special needs (dyspraxia), which I knew before, but now people can stop telling me I'm worrying for nothing. I really don't think our public school system will cope with him, he'll just be one of the numbers, but my father is dead-set against me homeschooling because I'm a self-employed single mom with a lot on my plate. I sort of see his point, but I really want to do what's best for my son. Here in Ireland, we're not bound by the same laws as you in the Stats. Schooling is a constitutional responsibility of the parent, not the state, so the state can't mandate how many hours per day, or what curriculum or level of work we do. We could even put all formal schooling aside and many Irish families do (just talking about life as you shop (money) drop the glass (gravity) and so on. I think the idea is great, but I would like a mixture of both, some structure, with the freedom to work around our lifestyle. I can bring him to work with me, since I'm the boss and I'm a private paediatric occupational therapist, so we've always kids around, plenty of resources and so on, but I just don't know if this is something I can cope with or if it will be too much. Any advice? Also, any ideas for programmes that will build on his motor skills that are so far below his reading skills (He's starting to read simple things already, but can't even properly draw a circle or triangle!

Thanks for all the comments below! They are all very useful!

Carol - posted on 10/02/2009

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Hi, I homeschooled for 2 1/2 years and just placed my 2 boys back in public school in September. Both kids seem gifted - their reading levels are many years ahead and math is at least a grade or 2 ahead, same with science and social studies. Language arts are their struggles because it requires them to slow down and notice the little things.



I highly recommend Hooked on Phonics for K-2 and 3-6. The first is a CD/book format that you work on together. The second is a computer/single page then book format that they can do more independently. My youngest started the K-2 at 5 and finished the 6th grade level a day shy of 6. He's a great reader and causing me a huge amount of worry now that he's back to reading "Fat Cat" in public 1st grade.



I agree with the other moms on here that warn you to steer clear of repititious material. If I found a curriculum that I liked I'd look ahead and skip the repeats or just do verbal answers if I was on the fence if they were ready to jump ahead. Also try to find a curriculum that has individual subjects, as opposed to a one grade for all subject curriculum. That way, if your kid is really advanced in math he can stay challenged. If he stuggles in social studies, you can take your time.



My boys loved the hands-on stuff from experiments to field trips. A cooperative membership to a museum that allows you access to other museums has literally saved me $1000's. The library is another priceless resource but it requires more work on your part to create your own curriculum.



Have fun - I miss it.

Letisha - posted on 10/01/2009

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I am homeschooling my 6 yo son. We are using Moving Beyond the Page and it is working well this year. Last year we used ABEKA and the repetition drove him crazy!

[deleted account]

I've always homeschooled my daughter. We started out with schooling at home. She finished kidnergarten at 3, 1st grade at 4, and then tried the K12 curriculum. Here in CA they only allow a child to work two years ahead so that was useless to us after the first half of the school year. She was already three years ahead by that time. Now at 8 y.o. she totally controls her own curriculum. She decides when and what she studies as she will read for hours on end. I have to literally peel the book from her hands and push her into the bathroom to bathe or remove the book from her hand to eat a meal. She writes willingly and loves to do math online (she uses Aleks). We've used Excel Math before (regular workbook) which is a math curriculum specifically made for gifted kids. A little repetitive for my daughter but we were able to pick and choose which problems she did. We've also used Moving Beyond the Page for language arts, literature, science and history. It doesn't move quite fast enough for my daughter so again we picked what we worked on. Love the curriculum though.

Cindy - posted on 07/23/2009

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I have a daughter I have homeschooled since the beginning. She will be 8 in Sept. and we just started 4th grade curriculum. I do get questioned if I am pushing her, and what about her maturity level and relating to children her own age. Well, I am not pushing her. She does so much better when learning is FUN and CHALLENGING. She has her days when very little gets done, she has days when all she wants to do is reading, and then she has days where she likes to have a list of what to do and trys to complete it. I'm thinking, what ever floats her boat LOL, who am I to say no, or that she can't go on. I think if God as gifted a child to excell as some of these children do, then we should alow them the oppertunity to grow at their pace, not the worlds pace. I was told that eventually she will slow down and her educational level will even out with children of her age. Only God know, and only time will tell. I also look at it this way, She is currently a year ahead so if she slows down it is not a big deal. This child is very social, loves music, art, medical stuff, is interested in surgeries and ER stuff, along with animals. We have to wonder if she will be a Doc. Nurse, or Vet, or ????? We lover her and we are here to teach and guide her on her path of life. The one problem I do have is when she tells someone what grade she is in after they tell her what grade they are in, she comes off looking like a bragger or snob. I have been trying to teach her how to be humble and watch how she answers, that there is not a bragging attitude about it. (Mama is Proud!)

Er - posted on 07/20/2009

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I have three kids. One is in public high school and two school from home through Connections Academy, a virtual charter school where students have all the curriculum provided, computers and equipment provided as well (even DSL if you are low income) and work from home. I have one child with an IEP for his special needs and two children who were deemed talented and gifted. I have found that C.A. (Connections Academy) has really worked well for us. Since my children scored high on the placement tests, they are able to work in the parameters of their needs to be challenged, but not have to struggle with the maturity levels of the students around them being much higher. Instead, we started a group locally that meets regularly and we take field trips and have movie nights and other fun social activities for them. This has been wonderful for our family, because our son who attends public school can participate in some of the functions as well. C.A. also puts on their own functions for fun. Since we are conservative Christians, the school even works with us to allow us to work around our differences in scientific beliefs, which was a big issue for us. Hopefully this helps many people learn about other options. They do offer Kindergarten through high school curriculum and even have electives for older children.

Janet - posted on 07/04/2009

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We homeschooled Owen this past year for preschool. He is reading books like "Mr. Putter," by Cynthia Rylant, and a Children's version of the Bible each night. He is obsessed with trains, and playacts all the stories he hears from Thomas, I Love Toy Trains, and real train DVDs. His is rather bossy, (only child who is surrounded by those who have the right to be the boss...lol) and really likes to keep the "rules," whatever they may be. But, he makes friends easily, and chatters up a storm. He is rather blunt with his communication, but he is only 5, after all. We are working on it.

Carolyn - posted on 06/27/2009

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i homeschooled mine for 4 yrs (during which time my oldest child went from 2-8th grade). Key things we learned together, conformity doesn't work. She flourished when I allowed her to choose what she wanted to learn more about. We shaped her entire curriculum around the things that interested her. By age 9 she was writing curriculum for her younger siblings. Its also key to remember that you dont need to rehash old material year after year like it is traditionally done in public school. This is extremely boring to a high IQ'ed child.

Wendi - posted on 06/20/2009

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I have homeschooled the last 9 years, started because my daughter was supposed to start kindergarten but was already reading Harry Potter. I figured she'd be bored to death, she's now 13 and just finishing 9th grade. It has been a constant battle but well worth it. I still feel inadequate at times but I know that they're better off with me than getting lost in the system. I strongly encourage homeschooling.

Sonja - posted on 06/14/2009

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I homeschooled both of my boys...my oldest until 8th grade and my youngest until 6th grade. We were involved in a lot of extracurricular activities that counted for a lot of our homeschool. We also took a lot of field trips for hands-on, experiential learning on the topics we were studying. We did the unit study method of learning in a more relaxed atomsphere that followed their interests. When they both went to public school they continued (and are still) to have 4.0 GPA's or higher. We still have extracurricular activities that follow their interests and keep them highly involved in community service. We actually followed the Moore Formula of Study, Work, and Service so they each learned how to earn money, manage money, save money at an early age in addition to community service and academics. Homeschooling is wonderful and if I didn't have to work full-time, I would still be homeschooling them right now. My oldest is going to be a senior in the next school year and my youngest an 8th grader. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

Casey - posted on 06/07/2009

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Quoting Amanda:

Hi, We're going on our 10th year of homeschooling. We have 3 children ages 14 ( ds 9th and College), 12 ( ds 7th and College) and 5( dd 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades). We decided to homeschool even before our first was born, but what really cemented it for us was that when he was 3 he was reading at a first grade level. Our other two have followed along he same lines as far as being not only academically gifted, but artistically and musically as well (sometimes it's a challenge to keep up with them-LOL). I would love to trade "notes" as to what works or hasn't worked for others.



Hi, Amanda...I'm interested in talking with you further. I have 3 boys 15, 13 and 2. My 2 year old is close to reading and progressing quickly. He's musically gifted as well. I'd love to hear what you've done with yours. My husband is mathmatically gifted and perhaps Micah will follow suit with that. Not sure yet, but he is showing signs of it. My older two are not acedemically gifted. My oldest is an artist and we've found a program that has accepted him, so he's set. My middle child is great at math but wouldn't say he's gifted. My youngest is a challenge because he is so quick and beyond his years it keeps me hopping. Can you help guide me?

Rae Ann - posted on 06/05/2009

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My daughter just completed 2nd grade at the public school and is enrolled in the Idaho Virtual Academy for next fall. Many don't consider this homeschooling, but it is school from home. I decided to go with this program because of its Advance Learner Program. They have varying degrees of dealing with advanced learners from skipping grade and accelerating subjects to just delving more deeply into subjects that the child enjoys. I haven't started yet, so I can't give any advice or report on how it's going, yet! My biggest hope is that this program and the one on one attention will help her with the emotional issues.

Missy - posted on 05/27/2009

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Will be homeschooling my four year old this summer in "kindergarten". Homeschool seems to be the only option working for us at this point. Montessori was great, but we just can't foot the bill anymore!

Nikki - posted on 05/26/2009

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I am homeschooling my son-we just finished preschool and will enter Kindergarten in the fall! I am actually struggling right now with how to find curriculum to match his varying ability levels as well as hold his interest. Kindergarten curriculum (at least for math and reading) is not going to cut it, but I am not looking to skip ahead either. Any ideas?

[deleted account]

We have been homeschooling our 4 children at home since 1998 and wow what an adventure. Our first child is the highly gifted one, therefore school for the other three has followed his lead in many ways. Therefore they are all advanced in most subjects. The reason we decided to homeschool was for the flexibility in what and when we taught our kids. Although this has been good for the most part, two of my children tend to be a bit obsessive about certain subjects, therefore when you inject the boring necessities, not everyone is very happy. :) haha I look forward to this wonderful group.

Dee - posted on 05/23/2009

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Hi, I home school both my boys, ages 12 and 16. My 12 yr old will be an 8th grader working at about 11th grade level, and my 16 year old will be a 11th grader working at college level. It is a challenge but they are both extremely gifted and they would not be challenged in our public school district.

Zoe - posted on 05/17/2009

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We partial-home-school. I volunteer in my daughter's classroom and present the California science curriculum in small groups with my own enhancements ;-) Guess where my daughter got her passion for science? We do EPGY math from Stanford at home (I really like it). I haven't been happy with how our school has been handling a child who reads WAY above grade level so I use her AR guidelines to guide her reading (For example if a child is 6.5 and in first grade, I don't care - it's my job to find her material at her level NO MATTER WHAT. The teachers have a fear that the books around 4.7 have content that is too much for "a little girl". Magic Tree House in Paris? I couldn't believe her teacher made her put it back! Daddy was sure Natural Sciences girl would love "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" as much as he did when he was a kid. She hasn't freaked out yet...) We also do "English from the roots up"... Dad started teaching "Art Vistas" at school so of course our daughter gets home lessons now ;-)
I have been putting together my own history program as the mistakes in "Story of the World" are mind bending.
oh! And we do Suzuki guitar.
I also love the writing method they taught in school last year for advanced readers, so we have tried to keep that going (esp in summer).

It was MUCH harder in preschool to home school her (we worked more on life skills like gardening, bird-watching, cooking, etc.) than it is now. While the Disney channel can be a source of sass, in many ways she has gotten easier to work with (she is finding having mom as teacher has some real benefits!)

[deleted account]

we are considering home schooling as one of our options for the future... It will be interesting to see how you all cope with the challenges

Amanda - posted on 05/16/2009

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Hi, We're going on our 10th year of homeschooling. We have 3 children ages 14 ( ds 9th and College), 12 ( ds 7th and College) and 5( dd 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades). We decided to homeschool even before our first was born, but what really cemented it for us was that when he was 3 he was reading at a first grade level. Our other two have followed along he same lines as far as being not only academically gifted, but artistically and musically as well (sometimes it's a challenge to keep up with them-LOL). I would love to trade "notes" as to what works or hasn't worked for others.

Amanda - posted on 05/16/2009

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Hi, We're going on our 10th year of homeschooling. We have 3 children ages 14 ( ds 9th and College), 12 ( ds 7th and College) and 5( dd 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades). We decided to homeschool even before our first was born, but what really cemented it for us was that when he was 3 he was reading at a first grade level. Our other two have followed along he same lines as far as being not only academically gifted, but artistically and musically as well (sometimes it's a challenge to keep up with them-LOL). I would love to trade "notes" as to what works or hasn't worked for others.

Julie - posted on 05/16/2009

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yep, home-schooled full time for 2 and a half years, now just two days a week. It is a challenge, and I don't know that I can satiate their needs and maintain my sanity! Currently, I am looking for ideas for educational dvd's at a kindergarten/ first grade level but with songs/ stories that are catchy for a 3-year-old. Our son (3) is showing these signs of grftedness, don't know how highly. Our daughter, 8, is doing algebra in second grade. We have been very, very blessed to have the head of the Minnesota Council for the Gifted and Talented teach a math class on Saturdays for gifted kids. He happens to home school his kids. In Minnesota, we also have a program at the University where once kids pass an eight grade proficiency test in math, they can take classes at the U with other kids- 4 years of high school math in two years and then 3 years of college calculus. Most of the kids are 11 and up, but they can start sooner if they pass the test. It's such a huge challenge though to encourage their gifts but find outlets that are age appropriate and don't require more of me. I already feel like I'm teaching for hours a day.

Thanks for any feedback. -Julie

[deleted account]

I have homeschooled my 5 yr old and just finished kindergarten work. His reading and writing curriculum was first grade level and he got 100% on the year end achievement test. I tried to keep it fun but challenging.

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