My bright 3yr old who has an amazing sense of humour vivid imagination loves to role play fantastic memory very social is quite boistrous in preschool & shows frustration may he be gifted ? plz someone out there give me examples of spotting the signs as I want to help him with his frustration so far I havent pushed or directed him in anyway .ty

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Sarah - posted on 09/02/2012

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each child is different, my son who is gifted (he is 3, but when he was in early steps was working at the age of a late 5yr old early 6yr old) he says mardy (he picked this instead of mum) im a realist and my toys are for pretending, he doesn't pretend that the sofa is a boat or an elephant, but he will measure things and build things (the da vinici hobby lobby sets). He gets mad when people call things the wrong names like at the zoo he said daddy this is a bobcat and this other little girl said its a kitty cat and my son became very upset saying no no your wrong its a bobcat. Also his speech was slow to come but now hes reading books like curious george, and has beautiful handwriting between normal lined paper he likes to write about things he does and loves it when i give him spelling tests.



I guess im saying look for other signs other then imagination, and a large vocab. I talked from a young age and had a great imagination but im just average.

T. Maenad - posted on 08/23/2012

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There are lots of things that kids will do just once. That's really the difference between a regular classroom and a gifted classroom. In a gifted classroom, the teacher really only has to explain something once -- in a regular classroom they plan to explain a new concept 2 or 3 times. Part of the challenge with this type of child is getting them to slow down and do a good job. It's ok to do boring stuff sometimes too -- they need to learn to expect that parts of life are boring. My kids have never been into art (that's not their gift) in fact I always could pick their art out from across the room -- it was always completed the fastest and looked the sloppiest. Keep reading to him. Read things he wouldn't normally pick out for himself -- like poetry. Jack Prelutsky writes great poetry for kids -- boys appreciate it as well. As he ages, look for stuff that he competes on a more even level with kids his age -- soccer or swimming or something like that. Look outside academics for stuff that challenges him.

Rather than giving him specific assignments (draw a circle) -- give him more open ended stuff -- you can build a lot of amazing stuff with paper and scotch tape!

T. Maenad - posted on 08/23/2012

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Identifying very young gifted children is something that the experts struggle with as well as parents. High frustration levels are common in gifted children when they are young. My daughter is borderline profoundly gifted and now at 15 is an amazing young woman, however, at three, she was exhausting to deal with. The emotional part of the kid is impossibly behind their intellect, of course they are frustrated. A certain amount of frustration is normal for any child of this age. All the bigger people around them can do so many things, and they can't get their body to do some of the things their brain is working so hard on. Make sure he gets plenty of physical outlets for his energy (I finally ended up putting my daughter in swimming so she would sleep at night -- nothing else was exhausting enough). If you have access to a traditional Montessori, they are great because the kids can do many things independently and work at their own pace with things. I wouldn't worry so much about identifying him at this young age as finding age appropriate things for him to do, and activities that he finds interesting and stimulating so he doesn't drive you nuts. It's pretty normal for gifted kids to sleep less than the average kid, so they can be particularly exhausting for parents.

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Jami - posted on 10/30/2012

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Your description just made me flash back to when my son was 3. I am so glad he's now getting the help he needs as a gifted child!



I also do not teach my kids (although they didn't start until kindergarten) and they still taught themselves many things.

Elizabeth - posted on 10/06/2012

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TY At the moment I will be going with the flow & teaching him more of life-skills as I beleive I may have been over doing or giving too much attention to academic stuff so will have a review in a few months how he is , I'm just trying to get him to pay attention to everyday tasks which is a work in progress x

Fit2BMe - posted on 10/05/2012

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When we had this question about our son, originally posed by others, we had him assessed informally and formally. Many children these days are extraordinarily bright or advanced. We have more informed parents taking measures with their kids to help being this about, and that's great. Giftedness is something a bit different, and comes with its unique set of needs and challenges sometimes. It's dangerous to assume either way, or to self-diagnose, or peer-diagnose for that matter. Best to talk to someone.

In our case it would have been easy to assume. We have family members who joined MENSA, and have extremely high IQ's, my husband and I both grew up in the gifted program, and our son who is gifted showed signs. However, I did not want to risk assuming he was and have him grow up feeling like he never measured up to a label. Nor did I want to risk assuming he's just bright and miss meeting any of his needs. At the end of the day, we found out for our own sakes, however do not use that term, nor do we make a big deal out of it. Labels are often harmful regardless of where you fall on the spectrum.

Elizabeth - posted on 08/23/2012

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Ty very helpfull my son is very active & needs constant attentention, he does prefer to play with older children rather his own age group & gets bored of the creative things quite easyily like drawing using scissors etc.. if I ask him to draw a cirle he will but ask him to draw again he wont saying ive already done it Is this quite normal? I would be gratefull for tips ty again for your reply

Elizabeth - posted on 08/22/2012

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Hi ty Chaya he is in preschool but unfortunately preschool think hes red flagged as there he shows SELECTIVE hearing & likes to be in charge & do things his way & when challenged gets the hump,& shows it, Ive had various assessments by proffessionals who are adamant hes fine in all areas even saying things like astute & ahead ,but no cause for concern, my gosh 6wks for your daughters 1st word ,my son could say small sound but 1st big word was circle at8/ 9months & his vocabulary is very extensive ty for your reply

Chaya - posted on 08/22/2012

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My daughter said her first word at six weeks, and had a great imagination at age 3. I hope your child is in preschool, notice if your child has a much larger vocabulary than other three year olds. It's normal for a child to get frustrated, they don't have the vocabulary to say what they mean, and the often don't know how to respond, or can't understand. My guess is that your child is quite bright

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