To test or not to test...

[deleted account] ( 72 moms have responded )

Good topic for discussion:

How do you feel about testing for giftedness? Did you/will you have your kids tested? If so at what age?



I have heard some parents say that they will not test their kids for fear of what the label will do to them and for them - in terms of both their self-perception as well as the perception of others.



I thought it would make a good topic for discussion...

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Rebekah - posted on 01/10/2009

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Many people have encouraged us to have our son tested, but we are planning to wait until around the time we're able to register him for school, when he's 4. We figure the test will be more accurate and recent, and we expect that having some sort of concrete numbers to discuss with school administrators will help us make some headway on the accommodations that he will likely require.

Juliet - posted on 01/09/2009

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We tested for two reasons-- 1) It was free. We were curious and had the opportunity, so we did it. 2) It gave us a tool to get Max into a great school. The school he attends is private and very expensive. But, they love kids like Max and we got a lot of financial aid so that we can afford to send him there. I don't think we would have gotten that much help without a report showing how gifted he is.

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Tami - posted on 02/06/2011

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I guess I view testing for being HG as the same as testing for a learning disability - you want as much information as you can get in order to tailor learning needs to your child. You want them to be as successful as possible and letting a HG child languish in a traditional classroom wouldn't serve the child well, and may present real problems as they get bored. I advocate for as much information as possible.

Lissa - posted on 02/01/2011

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We are currently waiting to have our daughter tested, I have been considering it since she was three and many people have encouraged us. My husband was very much against the idea as he didn't want her pushed and labelled.
What made us decide to go ahead and test was perfectionism problems, getting so stressed out and upset when she feels it isn't perfect (when it is perfect to everyone else) is so unhealthy for her.

Megan - posted on 01/30/2011

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Thought I'd share my brief story. We put off having my oldest tested because, as a gifted child, I had horrible experiences in elementary school. My teachers made an 'example' of me routinely. My desk was, starting in first grade, an absolute disaster, which prompted my( teacher given) nickname Messy Megan. That one stuck until high school! She warned the class that *I* was what happened when kids thought they were better than everyone else... But I digress.
After much discussion with teachers and administrators, we agreed to have Grant evaluated. We've really lucked out with the gifted programs, and as a military family we really appreciate that! Moving around is difficult for anyone, but gifted kids often 'feel' it on an entirely different level. Grant was nearly 5 when moved to Idaho, and had nightmares and pretty severe anxiety in the months leading up to the move. Upon questioning him at length, we found out it was because he had seen a Nova episode with us a year prior, and remembered the base was near a fault line, so he was convinced we'd be swallowed up in an earthquake!
Oh, and regarding the testing, Grant barely made the 'cut' but it was noted he likely would have scored higher had he not 'consistently engaged the evaluator in unrelated conversation.' :-)

Julie - posted on 01/27/2011

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Define 'gifted'
All of mine were (seriously) and looking back I DID NOT appreciate the things they had to get involved in and/or do because of it.
Let's let our kids be kids (they only pass through childhood once) and if they need more of a challenge let them read books or help others in their class or tutor children who are struggling...

Diana - posted on 07/07/2010

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I really think it depends on what you want to do with that information. I don't subscribe to the "make your child excel and go to accelerated prep schools" idea. I think kids should be kids - not miniature adults.

I recognized something in our youngest son when he was less than two years old. He was extremely interesting to me. His main way of soothing himself when he was upset was for me to do math problems with him. When he was seven he was able to do high school math. Now he laughs when he sees college algebra and says, wouldn't it be funny if that really were COLLEGE algebra. He thinks I am kidding when he uses my college texts. (grrrrrr....lol) His teachers had to have him define words that he used because they did not know them. They were fascinated by him. Although, these kids can have strong personalities and it does take a special teacher to be able to handle them. They like to ask a lot of questions and won't let errors in texts and theories, etc, slide for a second. Can we say "detention"? Hah. He always had to have things explained precisely, not just "because I told you to/so". They do not particularly care for homework or repetition of information. They do not always get the very best grades. Do not just use grades as a metric. It is a whole thought/ability process. If they are bored or unimpressed they will not "perform" for you. Grades may slide. When our son was in first and second grade he would turn his math papers upside down and then fill in where all the zeros were first, then other numbers in whatever particular order he had derived in his mind. But he hated homework with a passion and did not hand in papers even when they were completed. sigh. When he was two and three years old he would recite the alphabet backwards as fast as he could. He was odd that way. And amusing. And loved science.

In spite of all this, we never had him tested. He is twelve now and we still have not had him tested. We really just wanted to enjoy him and allow him to enjoy childhood as naturally and normally as he could. We felt like there was plenty of time to be an adult and only this one chance to be a child and just have fun. He has been fascinating, amusing and just a great joy to watch grow and learn. He does fear that he will be perceived as a nerd if kids found out he was smart. We let him make his own choices as far as how much he wants to challenge himself.

This summer he was nominated by his teachers and chose to participate in a gifted program. He took the ACT test for their measurements of his ability level. He just completed his first college level course in statistics. (ack! BORING!!!!!) He has no idea what he was doing or how he did it. He was just able to comprehend it and do it. He was the youngest child in the program.

We have no idea if he will choose to participate in the program again. He did enjoy it and learned a lot from it - including that there are other kids like him and it is ok to be smart. It will be up to him to decide what he wants. He has decided that he wants to be challenged more and we will homeschool him so that he can pick his own courses and work at his own speed and level. He can take college level courses and still be a kid, which is the most important to us. We really want him to have a childhood filled with regular childhood experiences with friends and sports. And he wants to do computer programming. So that is what I will teach him. Bless his little heart, he is such a little nut! I would not change one thing about his schooling so far. I think that now that he is homeschooling we will have an absolute blast. We both love science and computers and it is bound to be interesting here. LOL

For us, not testing has been the perfect way to go. It all depends on what you are planning to do with the knowledge. Sometimes parents do it to validate themselves and I think that is a wrong reason. Given the time and patience of the parents,etc, the child will find their way.

Everyone has their own personal needs regarding this though. Test or not to test, neither answer is the wrong answer if done for the right reasons.

One thing we have found to be true with him is that his mind functions at an adult level, his body is twelve, but his maturity level can be like about a 10 year old when it comes to making decisions. I would think this would be a bit confusing to be locked into a mind/body like that. We have always worked with it and tried to just keep things as normal as possible.

To those of you with young ones still trying to figure it out....good luck and just enjoy them for as long as you can. They grow up so fast.

Brandy - posted on 05/15/2010

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I have one son who is GT (tested at 5), and one who is autistic (diagnosed at 2 1/2). I feel they are both gifted, but i have taught them that the labels are just that, labels, and as such don't really mean a thing. I think it is more important to have them understand that having a label doesn't make one better,or worse, smarter, or dumber. They are the exact same kid they were before they were labeled and nothing will change that. The only reason I had my sons tested/diagnosed was to get access to the resources that i wouldn't have been able to afford on my own.

Michele - posted on 05/09/2010

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I have 4 children, 2 of whom are school aged. They have both be tested at the request of the school. They both fall into the gifted range. This was evident with my daughter from a young age ( weeks old - looked at your mouth when you spoke to see how words were formed, help head up very early and also was an excceptionally bad sleeper) but not with my son. He was very frustrated from a young age and couldn't express himself. Testing has helped us all and although we didn't tell him he was gifted or his IQ. we did tell him that because of the test we now know he is very capable of doing more than he is doing and yes that he is smart. Our 3rd child who is in Prep this year will be tested at the end of the year to see if she can enroll in kindergarten next year (she will be quite young for her year). Aparently if one child in the family is gifted the other children often fall with the few % marks of each other. Testing anywhere between 4 and 7 is fine. After this they tend to play up on the tests!
I have also been advised by a number of specialist that afterschool activities and sports participation are extremely crucial to gifted children as it helps not only with their coordination but with social skills and lets face it a lot of gifted people are not always easy to understand and highly emotional.
Good luck to all parents with gifted children as they do require a lot of extra attention and stimulation.

Deborah - posted on 05/09/2010

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Hi Hanoi,

It sounds like you have done your research and have concluded what I would have. He is not a native English speaker and should have been given a test in either Spanish or ESL (if that is possible). It appears to me that he is a child that becomes bored and acts out and you are caught in a hard place with our society since the majority of the educational world around here sees gifted as more of a reward for good behavior instead of possibly a need to keep the child challenged. If they wont retest at this point and I personally think they should since they gave him the wrong test ... talk with his teacher and see if they can provide more challenging work. If the teacher is no help then escalate up the chain. That might be more willing to retest him if you push a little.

Keep us posted!

Hanoi - posted on 05/09/2010

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I have read all you post and considered them very useful. I want to share with you my history and ask for advice. I have two brilliant boys that I am sure they are gifted. We are from Venezuela and moved to USA only one year ago (Jan 2009). Their primary language is Spanish, they have a very good vocabulary in their mother language (high school level) and both read very well. In Venezuela, we do not have a gifted program but, they attended to a private school with double pensum (English – Spanish) with small classroom, very good teacher that work individually with the kids to ensure best potential. Gabriel use to be in the top of the class and Miguel teacher told me that he was his most intelligent student and he needed challenging work to avoid behavior problems. We arrived in the middle of the school year and Gabriel (the oldest) was assigned to 2º grade (7 years old) and Miguel to P-K (4 years old). As Gabriel is a perfectionist was so upset at school, although they were in a bilingual school in Venezuela, their English level were not good enough to work at the same level of native kids. Gabriel received English as second language (ESL) classes but the school did not have this benefic for PK. Both were promoted to 3rd grade and K respectively. The PK teacher told me that Miguel was very smart and took the English easily; she did not report any problem. This year school year, Gabriel´s teacher proposed him to be evaluated as gifted in dramatic Arts. He was evaluated for the school and the State of Louisiana and the results were positive, he is now taking dramatic Art as extracurricular activity. In parallel, his violin teacher at school told me that she is going to propose him for the gifted program in Music at the end of the school year (Louisiana is the only state with a Music Program). Additional to that, in December, his teacher spoke with me again to evaluate him as gifted in all academic areas. The school evaluation arrived with positive results one month ago (percentile 97 in reading, percentile 93 in math and Overall intelligence in percentile 97). We are waiting for State Evaluation.
Our problem is with Miguel. His teacher reported behavior problems. He begun in the school system in Venezuela when he was 1.5 years old, we have never received complains about him. Last year, his teacher told us that he was active but was easy to manage. We were talking about him academically and she said that academically he does not have problems but he was too young and very active. We agreed to evaluate him as gifted. Results are the following: reading percentile 97 Math percentile 99 Overall intelligent percentile 50. That result does not make sense but the evaluators only said that he not qualify. What happened, he was evaluated with a test for native speakers. I have done allot of research and you cannot evaluate an ESL student with no proficiency in English with the test that he was evaluated. He needs to be evaluated with a nonverbal test. He only has one year in USA, last year he did not receive ESL support, but his vocabulary is not good enough for this kind of test. He read in Spanish at 2nd grade level and his results in English are percentile 97, he is very good in math at percentile 99 but he need one more point from the intelligence test to enter to the program.
I already talked with the council; she only said that she will evaluate him again on fall. Please, tell me what you think…

Hanoi - posted on 05/09/2010

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I have read all you post and considered them very useful. I want to share with you my history and ask for advice. I have two brilliant boys that I am sure they are gifted. We are from Venezuela and moved to USA only one year ago (Jan 2009). Their primary language is Spanish, they have a very good vocabulary in their mother language (high school level) and both read very well. In Venezuela, we do not have a gifted program but, they attended to a private school with double pensum (English – Spanish) with small classroom, very good teacher that work individually with the kids to ensure best potential. Gabriel use to be in the top of the class and Miguel teacher told me that he was his most intelligent student and he needed challenging work to avoid behavior problems. We arrived in the middle of the school year and Gabriel (the oldest) was assigned to 2º grade (7 years old) and Miguel to P-K (4 years old). As Gabriel is a perfectionist was so upset at school, although they were in a bilingual school in Venezuela, their English level were not good enough to work at the same level of native kids. Gabriel received English as second language (ESL) classes but the school did not have this benefic for PK. Both were promoted to 3rd grade and K respectively. The PK teacher told me that Miguel was very smart and took the English easily; she did not report any problem. This year school year, Gabriel´s teacher proposed him to be evaluated as gifted in dramatic Arts. He was evaluated for the school and the State of Louisiana and the results were positive, he is now taking dramatic Art as extracurricular activity. In parallel, his violin teacher at school told me that she is going to propose him for the gifted program in Music at the end of the school year (Louisiana is the only state with a Music Program). Additional to that, in December, his teacher spoke with me again to evaluate him as gifted in all academic areas. The school evaluation arrived with positive results one month ago (percentile 97 in reading, percentile 93 in math and Overall intelligence in percentile 97). We are waiting for State Evaluation.
Our problem is with Miguel. His teacher reported behavior problems. He begun in the school system in Venezuela when he was 1.5 years old, we have never received complains about him. Last year, his teacher told us that he was active but was easy to manage. We were talking about him academically and she said that academically he does not have problems but he was too young and very active. We agreed to evaluate him as gifted. Results are the following: reading percentile 97 Math percentile 99 Overall intelligent percentile 50. That result does not make sense but the evaluators only said that he not qualify. What happened, he was evaluated with a test for native speakers. I have done allot of research and you cannot evaluate an ESL student with no proficiency in English with the test that he was evaluated. He needs to be evaluated with a nonverbal test. He only has one year in USA, last year he did not receive ESL support, but his vocabulary is not good enough for this kind of test. He read in Spanish at 2nd grade level and his results in English are percentile 97, he is very good in math at percentile 99 but he need one more point from the intelligence test to enter to the program.
I already talked with the council; she only said that she will evaluate him again on fall. Please, tell me what you think…

Shayla - posted on 01/28/2009

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Here is how are experience with testing went. I need to mention Delyana is an only child, age 5, born with a severe visual impairment, gifted and in an accelerated kindergarten class. Sorry about all the labels, but I am new.



ok



  In our County, if you have a disability you can begin school on your 3rd birthday and you can enroll Pre K at the local elementary school.  Despite Delayna's Visual Impairment I always thought she was gifted, so I was going to mainstream her into public school, that had always been the plan. 



So we enrolled her in Pre K at age 3 and her teacher noticed all the things we noticed about her love of learning, awesome (although sometimes frightening) memory, incredible vocabulary all her talents.  Her teacher asked our permission for Delayna to be tested for gifted.



We are so glad we did because her IEP now has her listed as gifted, then blind. This is important because she will never be placed win a disabilities classroom!



Instead she is in a public school in a great gifted program a K-2 class and she has a personal assistant to help her navigate her day.  The test made all the difference in the world to my daughters education path.



 



Just wanted to share, feel free to ask any questions!



Diane - posted on 01/27/2009

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I'm highly gifted, as is my husband, so it came as no surprise to us when it became obvious our son is as well. We've talked to our parents and there are a number of things they (and we) admit to wishing had been handled differently and we hope that Nick will benefit from this hindsight.

We had Nicholas tested this year (kindergarten) and now, due to this "label", his grade school is required to work with us at the beginning of each school year to develop a written instructional plan that may include differentiated curriculum, individualized instruction and opportunities for independent study and/or any other classroom modifications WE feel may be necessary (and nobody knows our son as well as we do). That's a pretty positive argument in our book for going ahead with testing. We also know from experience that being social misfits had nothing to do with the "label" but being intellectually advanced beyond our peers (and in some cases our teachers) and not being given the appropriate tools to deal with that.

Jenn - posted on 01/27/2009

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We are going through the testing process now. We are in Louisiana and I tell you it is not fun for anyone. It has been going on since October. This is for my oldest. She is deemed gifted by her teachers, the gifted teacher, but not by the school board. Her IQ is well within the gifted range, but she didn't score high enough on the math and reading part of the test. Didn't help that the lady giving her the test told her it didn't count for anything and that she could stop when she wanted to. So she quit when she got bored and tired of listening to the lady. They are retesting her. I could have her privately tested, but that is so expensive.

Stacee - posted on 01/27/2009

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I personally see no harm in testing. Where I am located- having the testing done helps the childs education path. As long as you have had them tested and have the documentation you can do whatever you want. I think the root question in this discussion is not "to test or not to test" but "to put in special class/school or program" I can't imagine having such a bright child and never getting it documented by a professional. Again, where i live- you have to fight to make sure that your child has every opportunity and if that means using the gifted card, then you do. Every child is different and responds to challenges diferently as well, but how can testing harm them?

Natalie - posted on 01/27/2009

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Our child was tested when she moved to second at a public school. As long as your childs educational needs are being met why test? We had to test to get her into the only gifted part of the curriculum which was a one day a week off site pull out program. We tried to tell her they were going to pull her out to play a game at school. I agonized about it and checked on-line to see how it might all work. I worried that she would feel pressure to preform. (Her prior private school had never done ANY testing of ANY kind standardized or otherwise) so I worried she would not test well. We were never told the date or time of the "testing" only that it would happen. She found out from some of her peers that it was IQ or gifted testing before the test was finally administered. She still felt it was a fun experience or "game" as we had told her. She understood that if she "passed" she would be allowed to go with her friends to the "gifted center" and that is what she wanted more than anything. She did test in and she loved the center. The following year we moved to CA and she had to be tested again because they didn't use Wechsler III they used something else. Again, I worried would she feel upset or feel pressure about taking another "smart" test - because by then she fully understood what these tests represented. She also understood that by passing she was able to be with kids like her and if she didn't she would be with kids that she didn't have much in common with. She took the test and thankfully again passed. She is in a GATE or "gifted" cluster at her school. She loves her friends and her teachers. Sometimes, the public can't provide what she needs and we find that we still have to constantly advocate for her needs to be met. However, overall testing has given her great happiness, a wonderful peer group and good opportunities she would never have had without testing. She never talks or brags about the testing. Her peer group sort of underplays it. At this school it is called GATE not "gifted" which I think helps a lot. If other children ask about why she has additional work she tells them she just enjoys doing school work and wants more. It is also nice at this school because if other children want to try the GATE work they are allowed to. Her group likes this because they feel the more the merrier.

Lara - posted on 01/26/2009

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My husband and I are debating about the testing issue.  My daughter is around 6.5.  She gets stressed out easily sometimes; although now she is doing well with tests in 1st grade and is actually getting competttitve about doing so well.  She also doens't like change, and the only sort of gifted program is an accelrated school in town. Accelrated coudl be fun if it's creative and interesting or it could be more rote memorazation which she dones't like much (uh except when she does,lol)  She likes memorazation at her own pace an which is usually faster then most, of things she is interested in.  Cordelia is also very sensitive so if she din't make it she would be upset (if she figured itout).  The NAglie (spelling) she took, she only scored average - possibly high. Of course, she is and has always been extremly verbal, and that test does not test that and it has a low reiabliaty and valdity for those types of intelligences.

Karen - posted on 01/26/2009

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For Kylie -   Thanks for your thoughts!  We did not get my son's test's from the school.  School policy for children that don't make the cut into the gifted program they will not release the test to parents, they just notify us if they make it or not.   I guess they don't want the parents challenging them.  I did call the Superintendant to find out his score and it was withing 1 point of making it into the gifted program.  When my daughter was tested 7 years ago we got a complete report from the psychologist and her IQ (130).   She is highly gifted too.  Anyway, with all the homework they are handing out in 3rd grade this year I think he's ok with not being in quest.  It's hard though when teachers and other kids say to me or Jack, "You're not in Quest?"  "You should be in Quest!" .



Thats all for now ~ Karen



 

Critical - posted on 01/26/2009

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I wouldn't stress over the labeling issue. The tests provide you (and your child's teacher) with an important set of information about your child's abilities. Be it the NNAT, which is nonverbal, or tests like Wechsler or CogAT that offer a mix of verbal, nonverbal, and quantitative reasoning.



I agree that if the scores don't add up it doesn't mean that your child may not be gifted. Some test section, e.g., visual sections can be difficult for kids with visual learning issues, and verbal sections can be tough for ESL kids.

Eileen - posted on 01/26/2009

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One good way to get the school to do the testing is to whip out a request for an IEP. Funny how schools are quick to run batteries of testing for special ed but not for giftedness. I don't know about the rest of Virginia but in Fairfax County where I live, gifted ed does not count as part of special ed. In Pennsylavnia, where we used to live, it did and so special programming could be written onto an IEP. Check your school district's rules on that. It might be a way to go.

Dollia - posted on 01/25/2009

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Quoting Lucia:



I would LOVE to have my daughter tested ~ but the state of Virginia gives a lot of the say-so to the principals of the schools.  I approached the principal of my daughter's school and without even laying eyes on my daughter (the request was made over the phone) she denied her the test.






If I want to test her, I'd have to pay for it ~ which will run me about a good $800+  :(






Now she comes home with a minimum of 12 "busy pages" (which are worksheets that they're able to do after finishing their school work) PER DAY!!! It's frustrating me SOOOO much!!!






My son was tested in VA, no problem.  His teacher made the recomendation and told me she only sees kids like him every 6 years or so.  Have you talked to your kid's teacher, as they know him better than the principal?

Eileen - posted on 01/25/2009

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This is such an interesting thread! My son is ten and was finally tested last year. We had held off for fear of him feeling labeled or making him feel like he was unusual. Turns out, he already felt unusual anyway because he perceived his differences on his own (go figure!). He participated in the Talent Search program at Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth at the bequest of his school and ended up scoring in the 99th percentile on the exams, as well as in the 99th percentile last year for the school's testing. His "IQ" put him in the highly gifted range (it was over 170) and differentiated him even from the other children in the gifted program. Unfortunately, the schools are not really set up to accommodate a child like this, although I give this elementary school credit for trying. He can be a difficult child behaviorally, as I'm sure many of you know, when these children are not challenged adequately they can become something of a distraction to others in a classroom. He also is very anxiety-ridden and a perfectionist to the point that he doesn't like to do things he's not good at because he can't do them perfectly. All parents have challenges like this to a degree, this is just a different challenge because most parents don't have to figure out how to keep their child from burning the house down with their latest science experiements. LOL!

Anyway, in keeping with the thread, if you had asked me a few years ago I would have hemmed and hawed about testing, but now that I know the results, I feel that we are better equipped to help him with his particular learning challenges. He qualified for JHU's CTY program so he is able to take classes online and, because we are fortunate enough to live in the Baltimore/Washington DC area, he can attend classes at Johns Hopkins sometimes. The testing opens doors that you might not otherwise get without it; important for older children who are exploring their intelligence and their curiosity.

[deleted account]

Hello Ladies,



I am a mother of four daughters 171/2 16 13 and 91/2 and here is my experience with testing.  I have been a stay at home mother since the birth of my first daughter. My mother always worked in daycare and I was a teachers assistant at a very early age. I noticed as well as my pediatrician that my first daughter was extremly gifted.  When she told the pediatritian the paper on the table  was "crinkely "as the age of ten months her doctor was shocked.   I have always sent my kids to preschool two years prior to kindergarten the first year on Tuesday and Thurdays and the second year m w and f. I have always sent them to the preschool the connected to the school district they would be attending.  When my daughter was in her first year of prschool it was suggest by her teachers half way thru the year to see if there was an option to test her for early entry to kindergarten. At the time my daughter was going to miss the cut off my 25 days so with teacher recomendation even thought they did not do  early entry testing she was tested and we sent her.



She continued to blossom and they school wanted to test her for there gifted program which allows the student once a week to go to a diffent class and be challenge in different areas....basically keeps them from being board. We opted to wait but she was so bored in first grade we requseted a teacher for second grade that group the giffed children so we could test her.   This program tested for abstract and cognitive thinking skills...so keep in mind she could have had an extrememly high IQ if test with an IQ test and not make it in this program.  (I saw many very smart kids not make it and was shocked)when she was test ed you had to recieve a 65 for this program....she maxxed out the test....the school was floored and we were called in for a meeting. 



We were told that our school was starting a special program called Spectra   there were currently 4 boys and 1 girl in the program. This was an acedemic program. We were explained that it would excellerate the core classes. where in a normal classroom setting you would spend m t wed th   on a topic and test on a friday  this setting would spend one to two days on topic and test.  So by fifth grade my daughter would be at a seveth grade level.



We really went back and forth on what to do, we had her tested and when we went in for results which she had to have a 136 i think on the stanford benet Iq test we thought if she is just within 10 points we wont do it but more that that we would consider.    MUCH to our complete shock she also maxxed out the test and floored the psychiatrist who tested her  by getting a 196.!



NOW what!!!!   We felt we had no choice but to let her take advantage of every opportunity. Just two short weks inthe program we figure out she also has a photographic memory.   She can read a chapter in a subject and know it.  She can see a math problem and know the answer.  She struggled more with showing and explaing why or how this was true because she just knew it.  She continue to advance in this program....send grade...third grade...fourth grade now w are taking a class or to at the middle school depending on your advancement...my daughter was taking sixth grade math and science ans english.



WOW she was smart and we were proud...and then fifth grade came and about half way thru our daughter came to us and said she wanted to go back to her old  school.  She was missing her friends...the normal classroom field trips the parties  even though she played soccer she never saw those people at school.



With alot of discussion we went to the principal....imagine their shock.  A meeting was called  to make arrange ments...to our suprise when we walked inthe pricipals office...there sat  her and her asst a secretary a nother mom from the Spectra program the psychiatrist that tested her as well as another(I am assuming a second opinion) and the set of fifthe grade teachers(what were they gonna do pick and choose who gets my daughter...who wants her ....the smart one...who can challenge her..it felt weird.



 



It was suggested that if she were to go back to regular class that according to all of her grades she should enter the seventh grade!!!    WHAT!!!! SHE IS THE AGE OF A FOUTH GRADER AND YOU WANT ME TO PUT HER WITH SEVENTH GRADE BOYS...NO WAY!!!



After long discussions and a great fifth grade teacher(which everyone in the school said was the meanest strictest teacher of all) stepping in she went back to regular school with all the kids she started kindergarten with and was very happy. This teacher challenged allowed her to student teach alot of lesson set her up as a special tutor to those who needed it She was great!!!   9We only had a small issue with math because she was so advanced she was smarter than teacher an he was not so thrilled being  corrected by and 11 year old   but we worked it out!)



 



My daughter has taken advanced classes every year...she will graduate this year from High school in the top of her class along with 14 college credits in pysychiary which is the profession she has chosen.



 



So this experience has been an up and down adventure for us..and we have made the decision that we would allow our children to be tested if it is recognized and suggested by their  teachers only to have them enjoy the benefits of having a day to be accelerated once a week from the classroom. I feel there are way too many ways that a teacher can challenge and accelerate the child with in the classroom with all of their friends than to seperate them ad advance them so quickly that they loose their chil hood friends.

Alice - posted on 01/25/2009

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If he's been identified in school, he's probably already  been tested or at least screened. 

Alice - posted on 01/25/2009

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If he's been identified in school, he's probably already  been tested or at least screened. 

Stacee - posted on 01/25/2009

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In my state and county- the label itself can push your child to the head of most lists and options for school- so the decision was easy. We had him tested while we were testing for some other concerns and now the world of education is truly his oyster at least in Pinellas County Florida. Shortly after my son was tested we had my daughter tested. I can't believe the options they both have now. I think the decision to test is personal- but you should look into your school system and check out the opportunities they will have if they are tested and qualify. You can qualify but not participate- that's an option too.

Dawn - posted on 01/25/2009

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i thought long and hard and debated for a long timr before I tested my children. It was the best thing I ever did. My children still don't know they got tested and that they are in a gifted program. I don't feel children need to know that that they are gifted. I feel that there are smart children in regular classes as well.

Kylie - posted on 01/24/2009

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Actually let me clarify the "used to failing" part before that is misinterpreted. I just mean not achieving 100% all the time, understanding a concept immediately, mastering a skill the first time they attempt it and placing in the top 3. These are issues my children have at times had problems accepting.

Kylie - posted on 01/24/2009

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Actually let me clarify the "used to failing" part before that is misinterpreted. I just mean not achieving 100% all the time, understanding a concept immediately, mastering a skill the first time they attempt it and placing in the top 3. These are issues my children have at times had problems accepting.

Kylie - posted on 01/24/2009

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Hi Deborah What I mean by dealing with the mundane is exactly the point you are getting at with your husband. One of the things my ex-bosses always gush about to new prospective employers is my initiative. I believe this is due to being under stimulated in class and having to make the class time interesting and productive. I did this and try to encourage my children to by looking at ways to make the mundane more interesting ie. make connections in what they are learning in class with what they already know, using their initiative, intelligence and imagination to get the most out of a situation as class work is not always going to be interesting (unfortunately particularly so at their school at the moment as they have been in the infants section - my daughter will hopefully be more stimulated this year).  



Don't get me wrong I wish my children were stimulated and challenged in class at all times but do not see this happening anytime in the near future and so I suppose I try and assist them to utilise all in their power to make it as stimulating as possible. I completely agree with your comment regarding not being challenged enough so that they become used to "failing" as they see it and this is also one area I try to expose them to in a positive way. My daughter happens to be good at sport, music and art as well and is therefore not used to "failing". She recently entered an intercomp swimming carnival with the best swimmers in the state competing in which she entered with the 3rd fastest time but did not place and it became apparent to my husband and I after this how much pressure she puts on herself to achieve. We were then able to use this opportunity to try and instill in her the principle of giving 110% to something and then handing it over to the Universe as you are unable to change anything once it is over, so all you can do is your best and then move on. It was a great learning opportunity for her and one lesson she has embraced completely, which is fabulous as she is also a perfectionist.



I certainly do not settle for the mundane and hope my children never will, I just try to make the most out of it when I have to. I truly believe that you can learn from every situation in life even the mundane. I hope this clarifies things.

Deborah - posted on 01/24/2009

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I am really curious about your food for thought and the logic. I, too, have read the info about the movers and the shakers in the world and here is what I pull from it (and this is with arguments from experts in the GT world). The argument of the above average individuals in the professional world is that they learned through challenges and were able to over come and highly gifted children are not challenged and one of the reasons that are high risk plus when they do hit a wall they don't seem to have the skills necessary to push through b/c the skills were not taught at an early age since they were not given enough challenges.

So I haven't gotten the mundane concept up to this point and maybe if you expand it it will make sense to me. Because right now, for me, I see mundane as a big part of the problem. And yes children will have to be bored in school it is inevitable but isn't there a concern of what percentage that totals out to be? If my daughter is bored even 50% of the time than I see it as a major issue and let's face it we as adults would not like to be told you can work on that exciting project once you finished this paperwork which you filled out 10 times before. It is a lubricious demand and let's face it very unproductive for the company. And I can guarantee that the movers and shakers of our world don't sit and do repetitive work b/c if they did our world certainly wouldn't be moving much. My husband is a mover and shaker in his industry and he is a fast paced over the top kind of guy. He is able to accomplish things that people say is impossible: just gives him fuel for the fire. He loves to prove them wrong. If his employer changed things up and said wait you can't recreate the wheel before doing the paper game he wouldn't be working there for one and they wouldn't be reaping the rewards of his ability to hit the ground running.

Kylie - posted on 01/24/2009

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I just had a question for Karen - was there any area in your son's testing that was significantly lower than another? My daughter was identified as highly gifted by a highly regarded child psych (just based on off level testing undertaken by the school in linguistics - reading age 6.5 years above, spelling 5.9 years above and comprehension 4 years above) but when tested by the Assist Principal tested just above average on a verbal IQ. Very strange to administer a verbal IQ test to such a visual learner with auditory processing issues but that is another story.



Anyway, one area of significance that was highlighted in the IQ test and a subsequent language test for her auditory processing (in which her language was in the top 1-2%), was an issue with her working memory. While it was still in the 79th % it significantly reduced her score and of course being a verbal test made it impossible for her to score well as she was unable to retain the information without visual clues. The school acknowledge she is highly gifted linguistically but she also did not qualify for the gifted program at school because of the testing.



I will not proceed with testing for her again this year even if the school request it as it was demoralising for her not to make it. Two prominent child psych's here were willing to contact the school to champion for her but I felt it was at the extreme for primary school. I believe it is important for our children to be challenged but also believe it is important for them to learn to challenge themselves when faced with the mundane, as this will happen to them in their professional lives at some stage. Most highly successful people in the business world are NOT gifted, they are smart but not technically gifted (a friend is a child psych and sent me studies undertaken on children who were identified as G&T and tracked for approx 40 years). The reason I believe they are more successful than their gifted counterparts is because they developed other skills than just their intelligence, which is something I am hoping to develop in my children too. Just some food for thought!

[deleted account]

It has been so interesting to read everyone's stories and viewpoints on testing. IT has made me realise two things:



1. I have to warn Aiden's school before he starts there next year (Age 3) that he will need additional attention / work

2. If/when I have him tested, I will not mention anything to him until he needs to know the results as an answer to why he is so different.

Karen - posted on 01/22/2009

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Thanks!  I guess when he gets to Jr. high/high school they will probably put him in the advanced classes.  It's just a shame that he is not getting everything he needs from the school that I think he deserves.  I guess I feel like he's fallen between the crack, if you will.



 



 

Dee - posted on 01/22/2009

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We had reservations about testing our daughter. We have a son that is gifted and we did not have him tested. He has perfection issues that cause him some stress. He eventually was put into some higher level classes. He is now in 6th grade but in 8th grade math. He knows he is smart and the school at times does solicit us to put him in the IB program. He had a perfect score on a mean test associated with the florida FCAT. He also achieved a very high score on the FCAT itself.



As for our daughter. She was an extreme preemie and we were hoping just for an average life for her but she has shocked many. It ws noticed in PRE K 3 that she had very high reading comprehension. In PRE K 4...the teacher noticed that she was well ahead and reading. By the time we got to K she was reading on about a 3rd grade level. We did decide to have her tested with the understanding with the school that we would make all the decisions how to proceed. She had an oral IQ test with a school counselor and then a written and oral test with the school psychologist. To be considered gifted in our school district a student must have a 130 IQ...our schools funding has been diminished and the talented (but not technically gifted) part of the prorgram has been eliminated. Our daughter tested gifted on the first test. To everyones surprise...K children generally do not...they said it is hard to get an accurate accessment. She then tested well above average and with an IQ of 126 on the second test. Even though she now reads on about a 5th grade level in K and is so far ahead of her class...she technically does not qualify because she didnt get the perfect 130 on BOTH tests. All the test indicators (on a written accessment from the school) indicate she is gifted and well above average. The school unfortunately expected this outcome and wants to retest in 1st and 2nd grade...we probably will NOT retest. We will supplement at home until we decide what the next step is. We feel that she may not have "qualified" because her school does not have a gifted program for K students

Karen - posted on 01/22/2009

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Hi,



My 12 yr. old daughter is highly gifted and was tested for free in the 1st grade.  My son is 9 and I believe that he is gifted as well.  Here's the scoop:  Every school year since kindergarden his teachers are telling me that they believe he is highly gifted and they request him to be tested so we did.  They tested him before 1st grade and he missed getting into the gifted program at school because of 1 point.  He was crushed because his big sister was telling him how much he was going to enjoy the quest (gifted) class.  Anyway, his 1st grade teacher & 2nd grade teacher wanted him to be retested so the tested him again in 2nd grade with the same results.  It was twice as crushing to him.  Now he's in 3rd grade and his teacher, Dr. Johnson wants him tested again.  NO!  I can't do it to him again!  Something is not right with this picture!  I don't understand at all!  His report card grades are never lower then a 93 (math) everything elese is 96 or higher.  They just did a diagnostic reading test on him through STAR Reading and he's reading as a 5th grader in the 3rd month.  They took semester exams and he scored a perfect 100 in science, 98 in Social Studies. 98 Reading, 94 Laguage & 95 in Math.  Every year his nationwide test scores come back as all advanced.   I'm toatally confused & just wanted to share.



~Karen

Karen - posted on 01/17/2009

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I have three children. They are so very different, I pretty much had to relearn how to parent with each one.



My daughter is in the 96% in verbal abilites and above average in non-verbal. (Two different tests at age 6.5 and at 8.5 years. I couldn't believe how consistant the scores were.)  It was so easy to telI she was gifted. She was speaking words at 4 months and  complex sentences and counting to 30 at 18 months. She walked at nine months. She is also incredibly independent and unwilling/unable to compromise most times. She doesn't frustrate easily, but once there, she has extreme difficulty coming back.  She is now,because of testing, in a one day a week gifted program in public school that focuses on research, logic, and thinking skills.



My middle child was exactly opposite. He didn't start speaking english until he was two. (He had his own language prior to that but was uninterested in teaching it to the rest of us.) He would make his age milestones at the most minimal level and the doctor's told me over and over that he would catch up. He was kicked out of three daycares and three different activites because of his behavior. He needed up to 18 hours of sleep a day until he was 5, and his favorite thing to do when he was awake was to deconstruct everything around him. He was ahead in gross motor skills but lagged behind in some fine motor, sensory integration, and social skills.



By the time he was 4 all the doctors we brought him to agreed there was something wrong but no one wanted to give him a diagnosis. At that point I asked for testing to be done because I wanted to know what was going on. One of the tests was an intelligence test. He couldn't sit still for the verbal parts. I had to hold him on my lap to keep him from running off, so the testing could be finished. The non-verbal sections were exactly opposite. He would concentrate intensely and not move anything but his hands and eyes. He was in the 99.6% for non-verbal and above average for most of the sections in verbal skills.



After all the testing was done I felt there were things I could do.  He had speech therapy to correct his annunciation. He has had 5 surgeries in the last 3 years to help with hearing loss, breathing difficulties, and to fix teeth that had very little enamel. He still has OT to help with his fine motor skills, his balance and poor muscle tone. I could have his school teachers focus on what he could do rather than what he couldn't. He has every type of construction toy I could find and he is now less likely to spend his time disengaging childproofing or figuring out the locks in the house. (It was not fun trying to explain to the police that I do not allow my five year old to wander unsupervised outside but, during the time it took me to mop the livingroom, he figured out how to disabled the alarm and  the extra locks I had added, and exit his window.)



My point is, with everything going on with this kid, it would have been really, really easy for his incredible giftedness to be overlooked. After more than a year of constant stuggling, he is in a special needs classroom but knowing the level of his intellectual abilites helps me keep academics as high a priority for them as his physical and social needs.



My third kid is middle of the road. He is so much easier than the other two.There are no incredible feats either way (yet). If or when it seems nessasary, we'll have him tested. I expect, just from experience with his siblings that his verbal and non-verbal scores will be much closer together. 



Even though their lowest scores are still above average, I think bridging that gap in verbal and non-verbal skills for my older two children is the bigger challenge, overall, then meeting their highly gifted needs. It leads to frustration for my daughter when she can't solve problems that she understands. My son struggles with being able to explain the things he does and follow complex directions for something he knows he can do.



Testing did not tell me anything I didn't know. But, I don't think I understood until I saw their scores in black and white, how deeply these gifts can affect their personalities and how they deal with things. Testing was important in placement for our daughter, putting challenges in perspective and meeting the less visible needs of our middle chiild, and so far has not been needed at all for our youngest.



 

Erin - posted on 01/17/2009

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After having some odd behavior problems with my son in Pre-K and being labeled a behavior problem at the school (speaking out of turn, not sitting still, not finishing his work, not making friends, etc.), my friend insisted we get him tested.  We did more so just to see where he was academically for his age to show the school that we thought he might be bored.  After multiple meetings with the school they said he is not ahead, just unruly.  Got him tested at the age of 5 with 2 different tests only to show that he is in the top 99.97th percentile for his age.  We were shocked.  Needless to say, we took him out of that blasted school and finally he's in a wonderful gifted program at a public school.  His confidence soared, he's learning faster than what was expected even for gifted and he has made wonderful friendships.  Testing shows where your child is based on national averages.  It has been an invaluable tool for us knowing why he behaves the way he does and also what kind of education he needs. 

Angela - posted on 01/17/2009

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"You think it is fine for kids to be bored in school and to teach other kids as the teacher’s assistant. Sure every kid will have to face boredom at some point but to use that blanket statement only results in using it as a crutch which allows our teachers not to teach these kids anything. So they get bored and are miserable and depressed."



Deborah: I am not suggesting that it's fine for kids to be bored all day at school.  Students should be stimulated no matter what their abilities.  However, cooperative learning is not gifted kids acting as teacher's assistants.  It is people of different personalities, points of view, abilities, and gifts working together to advance their learning.  Case in point: Johnna's son not wanting to complete an art project because it wasn't logical.  Another student may complete that project wonderfully, and in discussing the work with another, help the gifted students appreciate other people's points of view.  Cooperative learning is supposed to help kids grow as a whole person: one who can work and learn with people who are not exactly as they are.  Many parents here have discussed social issues with their children relating to those of their biological age.  Cooperative learning creates a marvelous opportunity for this social development.  The goal of education is not just creating a person who can spew out facts and mathematical answers, it is to raise well rounded, adapable citizens who can relate to and cooperate with others.



A good teacher balances her students' educational experience... cooperative learning is only one method, and should be used thoughtfully and reflectively.



 



"Basically I am saying my child is different and I have known that since she was a tiny thing and even if I tried to ignore that aspect she would not. So who is to say how she will be in school. If she is content with how the class is then I would let her be but if she is bored and not learning anything and miserable with the situation then I will absolutely advocate on her behalf."



I would never suggest that you ignore your child's giftedness, nor that she should be bored all day at school.  I was merely suggesting that testing and identification as gifted is not an end solution to raising gifted children, and may not produce the intended results.



 



Thank you for your candor.

Deborah - posted on 01/17/2009

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Angela,

Thank you for another perspective on the topic of gifted and this falls under my famous comment that parents know their children the best and the bottom line is the parent is the one to make the decision that works best for their children. Also I really appreciate hearing personal experiences with gifted programs good or bad so thanks for sharing. But I do have to wonder if you were not in the program would you still have been on outcast? It sounds like you were in a small community and one that kids grew up together all the way through high school, which means clichés were going to be bad no matter what. And with or without the program I am going to guess the students knew you were smart, so would you have dummy down yourself to try to fit in and not live up to your full potential? Trust me I am not saying the gifted program provided that either and there is still many many flaws in our school systems. Which brings up my next comment. You think it is fine for kids to be bored in school and to teach other kids as the teacher’s assistant. Sure every kid will have to face boredom at some point but to use that blanket statement only results in using it as a crutch which allows our teachers not to teach these kids anything. So they get bored and are miserable and depressed. Each child is different and if one gifted kid is happy in the situation you present then sure leave them but another child in that same situation becomes a high risk. (and this of course relies on the level of gifted the child is at) So yes cooperative learning is a great tool and one that can work when organized right. But research is showing that the important element of grouping is critical for it’s success and when highly gifted kids are paired with the struggling kids it can cause a lot of problems. Again that is general data and some children are the exception.

And last this board is designed for talking about the highly gifted so I am not sure if your comment about ‘focus of raising your child’ is because you have been reading the boards and think that is all anyone cares about. I don’t think that since we talk about this characteristic we are overlooking the fact that are children are children. But my daughter is gifted just as she has blue eyes and blond hair. I will not ignore it but she is still a toddler and has toddler things she does. We do not hot house our child and try to fill her with information. Everything she knows is because she has shown interest in it. She has a love of books and brings them to us to read and then sits down and recites the book on her own. Her counting was because she was fascinated with buttons on shirts and would point at them when she was an infant and we will count them as she went up the shirt. Simple things that most parents do with the children but the difference is she retained that information and just knew how to count from it. She still goes to the playground and plays with her friends. She also has many a toy at her beck in call to entertain her. Basically I am saying my child is different and I have known that since she was a tiny thing and even if I tried to ignore that aspect she would not. So who is to say how she will be in school. If she is content with how the class is then I would let her be but if she is bored and not learning anything and miserable with the situation then I will absolutely advocate on her behalf.

Kasee - posted on 01/17/2009

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My 7 year old is in 2nd grade, and has an IQ of 154. We knew something was odd when he was reading his bedtome stories to US at 18 months old. It was a total trip, seeing that baby read! While school work has never been a problem for him, he has always had issues with social situations (making friends, sharing, being patient, etc). So he comes home from school, and begs to do worksheets from the Curriculum Worksheet books that you can get at Walmart. They are for any and all grades. Currently he is working thru the 6th grade book. The books are separated into all subjects, so he gets to pick and choose what he wants to work on for the day. We started having him use those to combat his boredom, and they actually work! He begs to do worksheets, and we've had him take those books into school so he'll have something "fun" to do while the other kids in his class are finishing the normal work. He still doesn't have any close friends. It's hard for them to relate to a 7 year old talking about novas and the chaos theory. We have had in-home training for him by specialists, specifically in dealing with these social issues he faces. I figure he can be as smart as he wants to be, but if he has no friends, he won't be very happy. If you've seen the show "The Big Bang Theory" you'd see my son in Sheldon. That show makes us laugh so hard! Anyway, as frustrating as it may be dealing with his issues, it is SOOO much better than dealing with a child who has low intelligence. My friend's child has so much trouble in school. How would that feel when your child comes home with a C on his math test and you are relieved? Whew. Makes me feel so blessed! I do get tired constantly having to look up what he talking about. Thank God for the internet!!

Johnna - posted on 01/16/2009

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Hi.  I haven't posted here, before, but have enjoyed reading the insights of others.  I have an 11 year old and an (almost) 9 year old.  Both boys  are exceptionally gifted readers, both reading well into the high school level when tested using normal standardized testing at school (we are military and overseas, so we are in the DoD school system).  Both are above average in their other subjects, and above average problem solvers.  My real question is that both boys' teachers seem quite reluctant to test them even for the TAG program because they feel that while they are, in fact, exceptionally bright and perceptive, they are not mature enough. They are also concerned that while they are both obviously bright, they appear quite lazy.  For example, as a second grader. my son was asked to decorate a paper penquin during the winter months.  While the other kids put hats and scarves and coats on theirs, he simply glued a googly eye on his and was finished.  His logic---penguins don't wear clothes.  Luckily his teacher was wonderful and re-drected him to understand that it was a creative exercise...but you get my point.  It was initially interpreted as a cop out, lazy response.  Much the same happens with my 11 year old.  Although as a perfectionist, he has the added issue of falling apart when he doesn't do well on tests or projects. His teachers are constantly upset with him because while he does well below average on his homework, he continues to ace most tests (he's only now beginning to understand that homework counts for his grades in some cases as much as or more than the tests themselves).  He was of the mind that if he knew the material, the homework was just busy work and he could better use his time elsewhere.  Having spent some time teaching (but with adults), I can see the teachers' points, but have this naging feeling that maybe something would be different if we could get them into a gifted program of some description.



Have any of you had similar experiences?  I'm at a loss here and would love to hear any suggestions.  Thanks!

Angela - posted on 01/16/2009

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I forgot to mention that one girl that was in that early gifted program I was in dropped out of school in grade ten as she was tired of all the pressure from her family because she was identified as gifted.  I found that such a shame, as I thought she was brilliant.. and she still is.. food for thought.

Angela - posted on 01/16/2009

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I know we all want the best for our children, so I just thought I would offer another perspective.  I was identified as gifted early in my primary years at school.  Once a week, I was pulled out of my regular grade classroom for enrichment along with other gifted children from the school.  This in-school enrichment was soley language arts based.  There was a core 5-7 of us that had this program until grade seven.  We learned poetry, analyzed it, wrote it, and learned advanced parts of speech, etc.  In grade seven I was pulled out of my school for a once a week visit to another school for enrichment with students from the entire district.  There we learned advanced theories of learning (the same ones and in the same way that I was taught many, many years later doing my masters degree in education).  I found some of this interesting, but as for whether it really helped me with my "giftedness" I can not say.  I was the only girl removed from my class for all of these years, and I was painfully tormented and socially isolated from this tight knit group of girls.  In high school, there were enrichment level courses where there were at least 30 of us participating, and so the bullying lessened (much to my relief).  I really can't say for sure though that my being identified as "gifted" helped me deal with the issues of being "different".  After all, I still spent most of my time in a regular classroom (yes, most of the time assisting my peers to do the work I found so easy...but guess what? I am a teacher now and I love it), and being so obviously removed and identified made me stand out like a sore thumb.



I have read on this board that parents do not appove of their children being paired with struggling students in a regular classroom since they end up just teaching them!  As gifted children, and in their futures gifted adults, they will do best by learning how to communicate and interact with people who are usually not as insightful as they are.  If they are raised with the idea that they are "special" and therefore should never be bored, or asked to help other students who are struggling, it will not serve them in their roles as future citizens, parents, spouses, etc.  Also, it has been proven that material that we teach others is the best way to retain the information ourselves (as compared to writing about it, reading it, doing it, etc).



Basically, what I am trying to say is that gifted programs and having your child identified are wonderful, but it shouldn't be the focus of raising your child.  They are still human, still cry, still fall and bump their knees, and still need to learn to become functioning members of society (which includes being bored sometimes.. lining up at bank machines, and the other mundane things that we all have to learn how to do).  I have not had my children tested, as tests here start at $1500 and I am not sure that the gifted school here is the answer for my children.  I have ordered the book you are all raving about though, and I am interested in finding other ways of stimulating my children other than the music lessons, computer programming, etc that I have added to their extra curricular lives.



 

Ann Megan - posted on 01/16/2009

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Being a parent is tough, but when it comes to the overall success your child you have to trust your child will be fine in a "gifted" environment.  Our daughter went into the Highly Capable (HI-CAP) program in the 2nd grade.  (There wasn't a 1st grade program)  I can honestly say she has never been ridiculed for being smart by the other students in her grade not in the program.  She is in the 6th grade now and has a great group of friends, most of which she has had since the 2nd grade.  I am SO glad we decided to have her tested.  I don't think it is wise to have children under 4 tested because you might get a "false-positive" in the results. 

Allison - posted on 01/16/2009

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We had our son tested recently.  He is 5 yo and is starting K in the fall.  It definitely confirmed that he is gifted, but at this point I really don't know what to do with the information.  Our school district for the most part doesn't start any gifted programs until the 1st grade.  I'm just worried that he will be so bored in K since he is reading and doing multiplication already.

Larissa - posted on 01/16/2009

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I was also tested when I was in the third grade, but am already planning on having my son tested sometime in the next couple months, as they already do a developmental testing series here for entry into preschool.

[deleted account]

The thought that Zack might be gifted crossed my mind a few times as he was coming through his toddler years, especially with his language.  When he was 19 months old, I gave him his supper, which included mushrooms in a creamy sauce.  He was putting the mushrooms to the side without having tried any, so I encouraged him to try them.  He put one in his mouth, pulled it right back out, looked me in the eye and said, "that was disgusting".  DH and I about fell on the floor from laughing.  



He was really the only experience that I had with children, so what did I know?  As far as I knew, they all used complete sentences and multi-syllabic words at 19 months.  My mom would say that he is such a bright little boy, but his dad and I are both smart, so it stood to reason.



Not until he took the CogAT this school year, and scored 98th percentile did it really occur to me that my child may, indeed, have a wonderful gift.  It certainly explained a lot about his sensitivity and behavior!



I cannot do further testing right now because the school doesn't offer it until the end of 3rd grade, which is fine.  I will be meeting with his teacher to formulate a plan to ensure that he is challenged in the classroom, and we will continue with enrichment activities at home.

Julie - posted on 01/15/2009

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I highly recommend testing and look into Petersen Academic group if you are in the NOVA area.

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