Worried about kindergarten- Gifted?

Lauren - posted on 01/08/2011 ( 28 moms have responded )

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Hi everyone. I'm new here. I think my daughter, Serena, is gifted. But I'm just now exploring this. Maybe you could read and let me know what you think?

By 18 mo. she knew the alphabet. I thought it might have been because we used sign language with her as a baby. She doesn't use it much now, as she can fully communicate but at one time she knew about 200 signs. She has been able to read (and sound out) 3-letter words for about a year.She didn't seem interested in numbers until recently but she can count to 100. She stopped at 112 when she got bored. The only prompting she had was a couple times she asked what came after 39. I'd ask her what came after. She'd say, "4...oh, 40. 41, 42....and so on. I was surprised by that because we've never really worked on numbers. All of the reading has been at her prompting. She enjoys it and often asks us to write words for her or asks how words are spelled. She's now spelling her friends names phonetically by typing them on our phones...which she loves to do. "Wilym" (William), "Adin" (Aiden), etc.

She knows all of her colors and shapes and has for quite some time. I speak Spanish with her at times and she seems to always remember what I've said. Dora is a favorite. But she can count to 16 in Spanish and knows her colors. She surprised me by counting to 10 in French the other day and she hasn't heard me say that in several months. She has an incredible memory and kicks my butt in the memory game...

She doesn't have any social issues at this point. She's VERY social, loves to talk to adults. She's very complimentary. Adults love her and are always commenting on her clear speech.

So, my concern is what to do with her about Kindergarten. I don't know that our school system has a G/T program. I'm a teacher in the district. There is a Reggio-Emilio based alternative school that my boys went to which is multi-age in the district. There is also a Montessori school not too far away.

I don't want her to be bored in school but I don't want her to develop social issues either which are, I believe, important as well.

Any thoughts, ideas, or input is appreciated!
Thanks.
Lauren

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Rebekah - posted on 03/29/2011

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I think you've gotten some good advice, but the most important thing is to know your child and her needs. What works for one child, or family doesn't necessarily apply to all children, even, or maybe especially, when the child is gifted.

If you think of intelligence along a spectrum, the further away you are from the average the harder it is going to be to make an average classroom situation work. Sometimes a gifted program or a grade skip will work, sometimes it won't, sometimes a different school or homeschooling will work best for the student and family. I think you're right to start thinking about this now, because you have many options.

I'd recommend doing research into your local schools, and research about gifted education in general. You may need to advocate for your child and it's a lot easier when you're prepared. I recommend starting by reading the book "5 Levels of Gifted: School Issues and Educational Options" by Dr. Deborah Ruf. It contains examples of gifted students along the spectrum and also discusses many of the problems gifted students encounter, why and what sort of accommodations these students require. The author also has a website http://www.talentigniter.com/ which you may find helpful in figuring out what options are best for your daughter.

Wanting the best educational experience for your child is different than pressuring them to achieve. And providing an environment that is challenging and exciting to a child who already loves to learn sets them on a positive path of schooling. Many children who become frustrated with the repetitive curriculum then begin to languish in school, and can have more serious problems in the upper grades.

I wish you and your daughter the best of luck!

Nan - posted on 03/26/2011

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Lauren, I've known so many bright and gifted kids who wear their 'giftedness' like a helmet. It sounds like your sociable daughter, like my middle boy, will be perfectly happy to go to a regular primary school, where she will make friends and have fun. It's okay if she's not doing calculus when she's five! If she's reading and counting well, the teacher will realise it very quickly, and sort something out. Don't stress!

My 3 boys are 'bright', but my middle is a genius and, though he can be a little odd, has always liked going to school and playing with his friends even though there was no special program. (He started primary school a year early, and was at the top of the class every year, but never complained that he was bored) What you do need to do, is enrich everything at home. If they are doing insects at school, head to the library and get everything they have on insects! In fact, the library is your new best friend. Your daughter, like my kids, will devour books.

For bedtime stories, read her the classics. If she asks a question, answer to the fullest.

I have heard bright kids announce "Sigh! I don't need to do this homework, I'm much too advanced..." Luckily for my son, no-one ever told him he was that special till high school, so he got to be normal. Ride his bike, play soccer, run races.

He never had any special classes or different work in primary school (except different reading books, which he chose from the library), but now he's at a special school at 11 doing french, spanish, latin, mandarin, german, all the separate sciences, various maths, literature, tech, ict, history, geog, and who knows what else. Excelling, and loving all his weird brilliant friends, but he still really loves his normal old friends. He can be a bit of an absent-minded professor (went to school in socks one day, I was running after him with his shoes) but we treat him like a normal boy and don't allow giftedness to be a limiting disability.

Don't stress! Hug your daughter, read to her, let her be a kid. There is plenty of time later on for her to study. Use her childhood to teach her the things that all children need to know.

Sincerely, Nan.

Laura - posted on 01/10/2011

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Pat yourself on the back--you have done a great job teaching your daughter! What you discribe is similar to my daughter and I know I worked hard at teaching her. So don't sell all of the work you've done short!

I would first find out, definitively, whether or not your school district has a G/T program. There are many different methods used so you may want to find out which method is used should your district have G/T classes. Some schools test for Kindergarten while others wait until 1st or 2nd grade. The school district where my daughter goes tests in 1st grade for the following year as the G/T class begins with 2nd grade. The rationale has to do with social skill development, or so I've been told.

If your school district doesn't have a G/T program then Montessori might work best, provided finances aren't a concern. My sister's kids went this route. Be aware, however, that because of the structure used in Montessori, kids can excel in one area and fall behind peers in others. This happened to my nephew who excelled in the math portion but lagged behind his peers in reading and writing. By the time he transitioned out of Montessori into middle school he was behind his peers and had some catching up to do. The success of a Montessori program also depends on the teachers and how well they encourage kids to work on ALL of the material.

Private schools may or may not be an option, again depending on resources. Private schools do not have to adhere to the same requirements that public schools must follow in most states, however. Make sure that you check out private schools thuroughly and ask lots of questions about G/T programming or "enrichment" programming. And don't forget that homeschooling IS an option as well! Hope this helps and good luck!

Andrea - posted on 09/03/2011

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You know your child better than anyone else so HURRAY you do have a gifted child. Send her to Kindergarten and let the teachers observe her and advocate for your daughter. Do not be afraid to ask the child to be placed with a tutor to give more challenging work. If she truly is gifted, the teacher will know also.

I knew my son was gifted when he spoke his first word at 5 mos and learned several signs of sign language by 6 mos. I knew he was gifted when he began reading store signs at 20 mos and completed the Kindergarten Hooked on Phonics computer program by 3 1/2 years old. When I informed his Preschool teacher of my suspicions, she told me that teachers will not assess the child until they are at least 5 years old. Sure enough by the end of Kindergarten my son had finished the second grade in reading and writing and almost the same in math. The teacher approached me and said they were going to test him for giftedness the next school year. If your child is 5 years old, go ahead and find a pychologist that could test her. This will put your mind at ease and you would know what direction to go from there!

Pamela - posted on 08/24/2011

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You know your child better than anyone else and you will be her advocate. Personality along with giftedness will dictate your choices. She seems like an outgoing child. How does she interact with children her own age? If she "fits in" with their play she will probably adapt to a regular classroom just fine, but if she feels other just "don't get" her she will feel more left out. Academically, gifted kids do fine in a number of settings and are usually self-motivated to learn. Obviously, accelerating instruction will accelerate learning but does it really matter if a student takes Algebra in 5th grade or waits a couple of years? Socially, however, she may feel like a round peg trying to fit into a square hole. My son had a pull-out program that he lived for because he said that it was the one day of the week that he felt normal. Remember that her "peers" may not be the kids her own age. Continue doing the things that I'm sure you are already doing: visit museums, go to the library, expose her to music and the arts, and let her pursue her passions. Set up a meeting with her principal before registration and get a feel for flexibility and attitude. Thankfully with time, kids self sort into classes. My 8th grader is taking Honors Algebra 2 in Junior High and the kids in his class are similarly gifted. He doesn't feel too different any more. Hope this helps!

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Tanylle - posted on 08/31/2011

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My husband and I feel that our second of five is gifted. At 2 he started sitting at the keyboard and just tinkering for 30 or 45 minutes. At 3 we found a very qualified piano teacher. Our son has now had lessons for over 2 years. Last year he missed the kintergarten deadline by 5 days and the district would not make an excetion to their rule. He attended Pre-K. (Pre-K is in our public school system,) He had the most amazing teacher that we worked with and he taught all the kids not just our to be the best they could. Our son is now reading on a second grade level. (which is frusterating to our second grader, they do homework and reading in seperate rooms) He fell in love with science and has already picked out a college and a science major and asked if he could write the school. He loves to learn. Know we are two weeks into kindergarten. He did not make it into full day. His 1/2day class he says is "baby work," we do not know what to do. We took are oldest to a private school for kindergarten thinking he would get ahead, he did in some areas, but had major holes in what he needed for public 1st grade. We are supplementing school, but they are only doing 1 color a day now. He "plays" accelerated reader with his brother. He takes AR tests on the computer where his brother get to take them at school. We are starting to build a go cart. He gets the parts and the instructions and under supervision is building it with his 8yr old brother. My husband and I think our second son is smart, but not mature enough to skip a grade. I guess we are looking for tips to get through kindergarten and on to first grade where our district has an excellerated program.

We love ideas!!

Lauren - posted on 08/24/2011

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Pamela,
Thanks. We have her enrolled in the Montessori preschool this year. We still have some time to think about kindergarten. She does very well with kids her own age...sometimes acting "mothering". We may end up just trying the normal kindergarten and see how it goes.
Thank you.

Melissa - posted on 06/18/2011

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We had a similar issue with our child. We were debating skipping kindergarten altogether (academically, he's 2+yrs ahead in math and 3+ in language arts) or doing a specialty program. Our district offered Spanish Immersion or Montessori. However, we moved and at this new school they don't offer anything like that. Our compromise has been to try kindergarten and see how it goes. The principal is bringing the AGATE teacher in to help develop a curriculum that would be more appropriate for him. [They don't have a formal program until he's several years older, but our only other option at this point is to skip him forward and we're trying to avoid that.]

I think it is a huge mistake for kids to be labeled as gifted this early, unless it would be overtly harmful not to do so. A lot of kids jump way ahead, only to taper off later and that can be damaging to their esteem when they've constantly been told they're smart. Plus, there is a danger that the first time the child is challenged, he will feel like a failure because he's been fed this idea that he's intellectually superior to his classmates.

Of course, you could always homeschool her and teach her whatever curriculum is appropriate for her.

Lauren - posted on 06/17/2011

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I'm in Michigan. We don't have anything like that in this area. Closest is an immersion school about 45 min. away. Too far. Good thinking, though!

Lindz - posted on 06/17/2011

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not sure where you are located at but there are Emersion schools where they learn and are taught is a different language... Like for example there are German school here in california.

NAOMI - posted on 04/24/2011

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If you haven't checked them out already lookup some other listservs. I've found TAGFAM and TAGMAX to be amazing sources of information and support.

Shannon - posted on 04/05/2011

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I found this thread really interesting. I had my son Liam when I was 20, Liam was a beautiful baby who seemed to excel in almost everything. When my son Liam was two, he would tell everyone that he was so smart cause he was a genius.. Little at the time did I know, that my child in kindergarten would be tested for gifted. After Liam was tested we had a meeting, and going there I learned that children at his age (then, 5) normally score a 100-110 on the state gifted test. But Liam scored 158!! Immediately Liam started his classes, luckily for kids as young as Liam they only take them out of his normal classes once a week. Liam is now about to finish the 1st grade and I've talked with his teachers and coming from those conversations, I learned Liam has typical gifted tendencies. His handwriting is not as neat as it should be, he can't tie his shoes properly and that he can't seem to think inside the box. Sometimes the need to stay inside the box with critical thinking is important and Liam tends to think to much into the question. All in all I am a very proud momma to a very special kid. He has a huge imagination and everyone tends to always be around him :)

Shannon - posted on 04/05/2011

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I found this thread really interesting. I had my son Liam when I was 20, Liam was a beautiful baby who seemed to excel in almost everything. When my son Liam was two, he would tell everyone that he was so smart cause he was a genius.. Little at the time did I know, that my child in kindergarten would be tested for gifted. After Liam was tested we had a meeting, and going there I learned that children at his age (then, 5) normally score a 100-110 on the state gifted test. But Liam scored 158!! Immediately Liam started his classes, luckily for kids as young as Liam they only take them out of his normal classes once a week. Liam is now about to finish the 1st grade and I've talked with his teachers and coming from those conversations, I learned Liam has typical gifted tendencies. His handwriting is not as neat as it should be, he can't tie his shoes properly and that he can't seem to think inside the box. Sometimes the need to stay inside the box with critical thinking is important and Liam tends to think to much into the question. All in all I am a very proud momma to a very special kid. He has a huge imagination and everyone tends to always be around him :)

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We have two (of five) children who are ahead of their grade levels. I come from an education family, and have always been happy with our public schools. I was super disappointed to discover that our district doesn't do any sort of real gifted program until fourth grade. The reason? Research shows that many kids who are "gifted" at younger ages coast back to the same level a's their peers by fourth grade. The ones who stay above are truly gifted. This makes no sense to me. First, by fourth grade you could easily have turned the gifted kids off to school due to boredom. Second, if the schools had taught all of those children at the appropriate level, they may have remained above the class. When you teach to the lowest common denominator, naturally some kids will lose momentum.
We got lucky. Our g/t daughter had some fantastic public school teachers, including one who did her own research into G/T children and designed an individualized program just for my daughter. This teacher really made a difference in my daughter's life.
Keep advocating for your daughter. Our schools are required to work tirelessly and offer all sorts of programs to children who are behind their peers, and nothing at all for the kids on the other end of the spectrum. Yet we pay the same taxes, and we ought to be able to demand an education that meets the needs of our child, too.

Kelli-AdventurezInChildRearing - posted on 03/28/2011

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Keep enjoying her and you will find the right answers for her along the way. You won't make or break her academic career one way or the other right now- sounds like you are doing a great job. my son tested in the top 1% of the nation. (i don't get to share that "tid-bit" very often) :) The psychologist who tested him said that she was so pleased that he was not under any pressure like so many that she comes across. He was just glad to be there and having a great time. Keep having fun learning and exploring with her and the rest will fall into place. Of course, you do have to investigate- I'm just saying that it sounds like you are on the right track -and the exact answers will come along the way! Have fun-

Lauren - posted on 03/27/2011

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Thank you, Nancy. We haven't decided what we're doing yet but I'm glad to hear things went well with your son. Certainly makes me feel better knowing that it could work out that way! :) I appreciate your input.

[deleted account]

I would suggest homeschooling or getting her in a private school. Public schools are going to do nothing for her and she will be extremely bored. I promise you just because we went through the same thing for 2 yrs. good luck.

Lauren - posted on 01/21/2011

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Thanks, Stephanie. You're right...that does help to relieve a little stress. It's true. I just want to make the BEST decision for her if I can. Thank you!

Stephanie - posted on 01/21/2011

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Lauren,

I already commented, but I just want to share this story with you to help you feel better about whatever choice you decide to make.

My niece, Amber, is 16 and will be starting college this summer. Her dad is a lazy bum who never worked (or can hold a job for that matter). Plus, he is a verbally abusive, racist, misogynistic pig and acts more like a spoiled teenager than a 38 year old man. Her mother will never divorce her father, because (I personally think) she gets death threats from him and is terrified for her life. It's really a sad situation.

Amber may have been able to get a scholarship to a private school based on her aptitude and her parent's yearly earnings, but her mother worked so many day and night shifts, just to keep food on the table and the light bill paid, that she really didn't have time to investigate school options and left it up to the public school system. Amber's teachers would pay for her to go on field trips out of their own pockets, and her grandmother would buy her basic necessities, like school clothes and a laptop

They also lived in poor counties and moved quite a bit, so some schools were pretty good and others were terrible, and she never knew which system she would be thrown into. Amber never had a stable environment for any length of time, yet her ability to learn and grow continued precisely because she was born a highly gifted child. A genius is a genius no matter what environment she is in! At age 16, Amber has graduated from high school and will be entering college in a few months.

So, definitely investigate schools, but don't stress out about it. Children can excel no matter where they end up, especially if they have a natural ability to learn quickly. (There were also good teachers and counselors who recognized Amber's brightness and helped her on her path.) And since you are a concerned parent asking questions, I know your daughter will excel quickly.

It used to be much harder for me to brag about my daughter to parents with children her age who were not on the same level. Now I'm finding that, after a short while, people see her intelligence and maturity anyway so there is no use trying to humbly hide it. They are astonished and comment on her to me all the time anyway. Just be a proud mama. It's okay to brag...especially to academia!

Lauren - posted on 01/20/2011

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Thank you, Rebekah! I appreciate the reminder to be an advocate for her, just as I would for my boys... You're right, too....I don't ask as many questions because I feel I'm bragging. I need to work on that. Thanks for your help.
Lauren

Rebekah - posted on 01/20/2011

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Wow, sounds a lot like my son, who is turning 5 in a few weeks, except he is REALLY into numbers and science. But, same deal with learning alphabet at 18 mo., excellent memory, social, etc. We started him in a Montessori preschool when he was 2, for just 2 mornings a week. After that, we enrolled him in a Spanish immersion Montessori program which was half-days. This year, he is in a full-day program with Montessori preschool in the morning and Spanish immersion in the afternoon. He LOVES it. That isn't to say it is completely without problems for a PG little boy, but they are doing their best to find things that interest him that are not so repetitive or far below his level (others in the class are learning letter sounds, while he is reading at at least a 4th grade level, for instance). I do think the Montessori model is excellent for gifted children because the times when they are allowed to chose their own work means there is the ability to differentiate and provide more challenging work. However, it is highly dependent on the teachers and the administration in the school. Some are excited to work with a bright student who likes to learn, and some will give you the line about evening out, or needing to learn to socialize, etc. We don't have any Reggio schools here, so I'm not as familiar with them, but it sounds as though you have experience with that school with your sons and it may be a good place to start. When we were choosing the school for our son, I contacted many of our options and asked what they would be able to do to "accommodate" a child with abilities very disparate from the norm. The responses helped weed a few out right from the start. Don't feel that you're bragging; it's a valid concern. I have always tried to approach it by saying that my son loves to learn right now and we want to provide him the environment and education which will continue that interest. (Something I feel the current curriculum standards and practices of our public schools do not, unfortunately). I think that help differentiate you from the "pushy parent" stereotype who just wants their child to have and be the best.
I wish you the best of luck with your quest and I hope you'll come back here with any questions and information you find out if you need anything else. I've found this and other gifted forums to be a huge help when you're navigating the world of gifted education and parenting. Otherwise it can be a very isolating experience. Best of luck to you and your daughter.

Stephanie - posted on 01/19/2011

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Your daughter sounds a lot like my daughter, Sarah. Sarah just turned 5 and is currently in pre-school. Her teacher said she will definitely be tested for G/T (1st grade in our county), but warned me that not all G/T are good so to really investigate it before I make that decision.

Like you, I was trying to decide whether or not to put her in private, Montessori, or public school next year. I ruled out Montessori after investigating it. I talked to several parents of Montessori children. When students have to go into school another system, they do not do as well. In my state, Montessori school ends in middle school so students must go to a private or public high school. But even if it went through high school, they still would not be prepared for a college or "real world" setting.

Montessori allows children to work in one modality they feel comfortable with, at their own pace. This is good for a while, but children really need to stretch and build skills in all areas/modalities. And the M kids are not as socially involved as other children. Of course, there are truly wonderful benefits to Montessori, but the negatives simply outweighed the positives for me.

Then, I was going to put her in private school. She can get a full scholarship through my church. I had even started the enrollment process last month, but she was insisting on going to public school with her friends and wearing whatever clothing she wants. (She is very fashion conscious--not sure where she gets that from!--and can't stand the thought of wearing a uniform.) Plus, she is a social butterfly.

Because I live in an affluent area with a really great public school district, I'm going to start her out there (in a G/T program) and see how she does. I may end up moving her to a parochial school later, depending on her progress. She is also very athletic and is better than the boys on her soccer team. And she can hold her own when sticking up for herself and other people. So that's why I think she will fit into the public system quite well.

My 3 year old son is the complete opposite. He is being tested for LDs and Aspergers. My county public school system has the best autism program in the state, so he will definitely be going there and it will be nice for him to have a big sister in the same school. That was the clincher for me on deciding where she should go to school.

Of course you will need to decide what's right for your own daughter, but from what you've described, she is definitely hitting developmental markers early and most likely IS gifted. I know you will figure it out and make the best decision. Good luck to you and Serena!

Stephanie

Lauren - posted on 01/11/2011

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Laura and Laurie, (I'm Lauren - a connection?) ;)

Thank you for your responses. I've heard from people who have "average" children who seem to think I shouldn't give it too much thought....because she might just "balance out" in kindergarten.

It's hard to share with other moms because I don't want to feel like a braggart when my doll is doing something exceptional. But I get so excited.

She is my third. I have two boys, 15 and 11. Big gap, then Serena. Both my husband and I are teachers which can be good and bad at the same time.

I think like most parents, we just want the best for our kids. We want them to learn in a positive environment and to be challenged to do their best. My oldest really dislikes school and has struggles with reading. He's smart but lazy and unmotivated. However, I know that when he finally sets his mind to what he wants from his future, he will tackle it.

My youngest son loves school and is an avid reader. He is above-average in reading and math. It's a joy to hear him talking about school. So, you can imagine I'm thrilled that Serena is learning like she is. I teach French and Spanish and my husband teaches Anatomy and Physiology at our local community college. We've got some of our bases covered. ;)

But even though my youngest son is above average, this is whole new territory for us. I appreciate the advice. I'll be coming back here more often!!

Thank you, thank you!!
Lauren

Laurie - posted on 01/10/2011

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Lauren-
Hang in there and I'm so glad you are thinking about this now! Your daughter and my son would make great friends:) In my experience and research, most public schools do not begin formal gifted and talented testing until 2nd grade. There are of course exceptions, so I'd recommend to ask the school (or school district) directly...especially as at this point she isn't in the system yet. Depending on your school district, you can also generally go on their website and see the specific curriculum by quarter to see the learning topics that will be covered.

My son echoed many of the same developmental milestones as your daughter. And now as he has aged he picks up material what appears to me to be very quickly. For example he went from reading the 'rhyming words' fat, cat, sat... to 3rd-4th grade reading almost immediately without us changing the material we read with him. I would anticipate with the information you've presented you might be experiencing the same very soon.

We were in what I thought was a unique position because he missed the cut off for kindergarten by 2 weeks - so I actually had hoped to enroll him in kindergarten a year early. Instead he started kindergarten and turned 6, 2 weeks later. So not only did we have a child very academically "ready" but also "older." In my state (Kansas) and city (a suburb of Kansas City) that is simply impossible to begin school early unless we would have put him in a private school. He was in a peer model program for 2 years at the same school (where he was paired with children with some delays; we LOVED it as he learned empathy and patience).

Despite loving school, it has become a challenge this year. He has on occassion refused to do "center work" because he was bored with the material. We of course stressed that all tasks are important and he needs to do them (he is also a perfectionist which may add to this problem). It got better for awhile once the teacher gave him special material catered towards him. But then, when reading groups were assigned, he was solo as there were not other kids reading at the same level. She offered him independent material which worked for enrichment but then we ran into problems because he was trying to "be the teacher." When a child would struggle with a concept he'd try to tell them how to do it - and was exhibiting some bossy behavior.

My husband and I have struggled because as you mentioned with your daughter - he is very social and well liked by people including his peers. He tells jokes and just is a fun, little guy (of course we are biased:) The problem is despite social experiences, preschool and activities he really has little interest in children his age. He likes them, but they don't have shared experiences. If it were his choice he'd hang out with kids 10 or older or adults (it is only amplified as he is an only child). Hopefully with your daughter she is more compliant and will be learn to find other ways to 'interact'. But as I could have written your post - I wanted to honestly share my experiences. You need to be an advocate for her and frankly you'll need to be prepared for some challenges early on.

So anyway with this long story, here is where I'm going. Now as we enter the second quarter of kindergarten - here is what I would have done differently. I was too afraid to ask the questions to the school in advance. I didn't want to be "that parent" or perceived as bragging. I now realize waiting for the teacher to notice what I already knew was wrong. I don't care if my child is gifted or otherwise I just want the best opportunities for him which I can tell by your lovely post is what you are after as well. Unfortunately for this wonderful teacher she has 20 students all of different situations, knowledge, enrichment and interests. All wonderful kids but all very different - and so it took time for her to see the levels kids were out - and by that time my son (and others) were already bored.

Secondly, I struggled with how to offer enrichment to our son and not making him more bored. I now realize that 'gifted' or not my son is a child that always will need more...an introduction is not 'him' he wants to know details and wants more experience. Because of that I've found ways to complement the school material without repeating it. The school has offered guidance to help but I wish I would have asked in advance. Also look to your community to find opportunities too. My son is very interested in science, especially astronomy - we found a science club where he meets once a month for lessons and activities.

Thirdly network with others in your area. Homeschooling networks are a great resource that can offer enrichment ideas as well as playgroups (assuming they are open to non homeschoolers too...most are). This is a great way to find opportunities for your kiddo to play and interact with others that may focus on specialized activity: reading, drama, math etc.

And finally, don't be afraid to give feedback to your school board. I am on the PTA so I didn't want to rock the boat. But I attended a forum to learn about how my school operated including their curriculum design. I then offered specific recommendations and input (in a positive and constructive way).

If I can offer any other thoughts let me know. Best of luck to you!!!

Laurie

Lauren - posted on 01/08/2011

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I meant to write about the counting, I would prompt her with "what comes after 3?" and she'd say "4...oh, 40..."

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