I teach in a Christian School and I teach Jr. High and High School

Diane - posted on 07/14/2009 ( 7 moms have responded )

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Trying to get inside the brain of a jr. high and sr. high school student still at times escapes me.

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Jennifer - posted on 07/15/2009

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What I have learned from seminars, classes, books etc. The teenage brain is similar to that of a two year old. Reason 1: There is all sorts of learning going on at this time-new setting, new friends, new activities, new body development. The neurons are not firing everywhere they should, just as a two year old. The teenager may have some control of their emotions, but you may see typical behavior outbursts just as a toddler. Reason 2: Hormones, hormones, hormones-they can't help they are stuck in limbo between adulthood and childhood. They are trying to find their groove, so as an adult we can steer them in the right direction by being a listening, empathetic individual they can trust!

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Amanda - posted on 07/09/2011

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I agree with Rosa and her post was most helpful. I would love to hear more, my daughter is entering 6th grade this year. We live in an area where both parents work one job so it's not as bad as Rosas area. That is why we left California, to have more time with our children. I saw a video once called " To a child love is spelled T-I-M-E" and it is so true. If you are busy having "you" time on facebook, email or other things more than 30 min a day then your kids think those things are more important that doing things with them...in my opinion. It is hard to find things to keep them talking, to get in their head and to really have them open up which is what I think Diane was saying. Maybe we could all post topics that we know of that got our kids talking. The oil spill and current events really get my daughter going.

Rosa - posted on 07/17/2009

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This is a conversation we have very often in my middle school. In an urban district where many parents work 2 to 3 jobs, and many kids don't live with parents, I've noticed that they can't see or plan for the future. They see the struggles their guardians go through and think that is what life is about. It's getting through today to reach tomorrow. NOT next year or adulthood. It's sad and it is important that we as teachers get them to think about the future and how they really want it to go. I have honest conversations about life with them. Let them ask those hard questions and explain to them the consequences of not working hard, living just for pleasure and money, etc. I teach 6th grade and they are very receptive. It's important that we as teachers don't work in a bubble and collaborate with our coworkers to let them know what we know personally about students so that we can all give them the positive influences, talks, and support they so desperately need from an adult. Keeping close contact with guardians is also very important, even if they are not receptive. These kids need more than brainfood. They need role models and nurturing for a good future.

Kanice - posted on 07/15/2009

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i didn't take it as if you were being negative, i wasn't sure what you were asking. Teenagers are dealing with so many things these days, at times, it is overwhelming for to them. i talk with a lot of teenagers, majority of them, were previous students from my school. i befriend them, but i don't try to be their friends if that makes any since. i guess what i am saying is I allow them to see the human side of me. I allow them to see that i am not perfect. i've made plenty of mistakes, some i wished i could have avoided. i also tell them if I had someone who would have listnened to me like they do, I probably wouldn't have made as many mistakes. i listen to them, and i don't always try to give them advice right off. I may wait a lil while to say this or that about it. Even if they are wrong, I don't throw it in their face but I do explain to them how they were wrong. i let them know I am not here to be their buddy but i am here to be that extra set of ears or that extra shoulder they may need. i hope this helps.

Diane - posted on 07/15/2009

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I wasn't actually trying to sound negative about teens - I have 2 of my own, I just try to help them to learn and many times they sabatoge themselves and I want better for them. I also know that they should learn from their mistakes, I just would rather help them to see before they fall not after.

Zoriana - posted on 07/15/2009

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I think is even worse when you try to get inside your own child's brain. I guess I can't answer either, but if you do find out, let me know.

Kanice - posted on 07/14/2009

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What are we debating? Have you tried talking with jr. high and sr. high students? You can learn a lot if you just listen to what they have to say. We have to remember they are growing up in different time period from when we grew up.

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