Continental vs. English methods

Britney - posted on 01/01/2010 ( 6 moms have responded )

18

15

0

I recently learned how to knit using the English method, and a friend of mine said that the Continental method is faster and is easier on joints. Well...I tried to learn Continental, and it is very difficult for me to get the handle of. The tension is hard to control, and I feel like I have to guide the yarn onto the needle with my left middle finger, which seems counterproductive.



Those of you who have tried both, is it worth the struggle to relearn a new technique? I am working on a blanket, and my hands start to ache after a day of knitting on and off. I read that switching between Continental and English can help you knit longer without experiencing repetive motion injuries. Thoughts?

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

6 Comments

View replies by

Serene - posted on 01/30/2010

45

34

1

I do both, but I am a crocheter, so both are rather easy for me. Try wrapping the yarn on your fingers to help control the tension. If you have no need for another technique, I would not bother learning another. As for the hand aches, keep your hands warm, and smooth. If they become painful, try using an anti-inflammatory to ease the discomfort. Switching CAN help you last longer, but so can knitting left-handed for one row and back, and right for the next set, Though I do not see a point to it!

Other than that, I rest both arms on a boomerang pillow in my lap while I knit and crochet. It helps the shoulder strain. I would also think that making something big and heavy like a blanket would increase the strain, so keep the blanket at the same level as the rest of your work.

Let us know how it goes!

Kathryn - posted on 01/17/2010

2

8

0

I learned English style and have knitted for years. My friends are amazed at how fast I can knit and can even do so without looking for a short time. I began teaching myself continental stitching and use it for making scarfs on large needles, but I am still faster with the English style. I have the same issue with tension you mentioned. I wouldn't worry about which is "faster" cause that comes with practice. Go with what you know. I would love to learn continental with a teacher, but that is difficult to do where I live. The same issue is present in crocheting techniques. I crochet one way and my daughter another way. The key is that you are productive and enjoy being creative no matter which method you use.

Jennifer - posted on 01/16/2010

34

20

1

I do both. I actually knit continental and purl English. I just can't get the hand motion down to purl continental. I think that is matters more what you are comfortable with. I struggled with both methods upon learning them, but now have gotten pretty good at my "dual method" of working. There are more methods than just those two, so it is all a matter of preference.

[deleted account]

I knit English and I'm perfectly happy and get tired of people telling me I "knit wrong". I've tried Continental and I can do it. I used both hands to do color work. I always go right back to knitting English. It works for me, is easier on my hands and I like my outcome. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Tracy - posted on 01/12/2010

6

11

1

I learned how to knit from my Mom using the Continental method. I have watched a friend knit using the English method and just thought, wow that'll take her forever! I looked on YouTube and watched a woman teach Continental knitting - at least, I tried to watch it! She was confusing!! I say learning hands on from someone is best. When I had my Mom give me a refresher course a few years ago, I videotaped it with my camera so I could watch it when she wasn't around.

Angelique - posted on 01/02/2010

43

8

1

I YouTubed the different methods. I use English myself, but found that my hands would stiffen up completely! I also find the continental a little difficult to get used to... To be honest I have started using Tunisian crochet for all my "knitting" patterns - as it has a purl and plain stitch which look knitted.



I think practicing and perseverance is the key, I'm sure none on us learned how to do the English method in a single sitting, maybe the continental method needs the same amount of dedication.



Good luck! You have motivated me to try learning to do it now, too!

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms