8 year old not doing homework.

Shannintipton - posted on 03/30/2011 ( 53 moms have responded )

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I cannot get my 8 yr old to do his homework without a major, and I mean major fight. Its not like he doesn't understand it. He just doesn't want to take the time to do it. He also wants me to sit right there with him (not just be in the same room) while he is doing it. It can take up to three hours to do his homework. I cant take away tv, toys or wii because we dont have time to play them, we're too busy doing homework. Any suggestions{:+)

thanks

shannin tipton

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Cody - posted on 03/31/2011

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My third grader used to be great at getting her homework done k-2nd now all of a sudden it is like pulling teeth. I finally realized that since she is in an early school 7:30-2:15 that she really needed a break after school in order to refocus and rest after school. I give her 1 hour to goof off and do what ever she wants but then she has to get her work done. If she fails to complete what she has to do she loses her TV time, Wii and DS time. I sat her down and told her that the choice was hers how she wanted to progress, she can either get the work done and enjoy the rest of her night or not do it and be stuck in her room with nothing but homework to do and an early bed time. She quickly figured out that I was not joking and I had no problem following through on the punishment and I told her that you had a choice and you chose to have it this way. Now homework is done quickly and right with out a fight. She slips on occassion but for the most part she enjoys having her evening to do as she wants.

Tarina - posted on 04/03/2011

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Shannon, My oldest is in 4th grade this year, and his homework load is seeming to finally be up to about the level you are describing, so I think I can relate (my son turns 10 in May) - We started this year with a TERRIBLE track record for doing/turning in homework, but it has eased some over the year. Im going to throw alot at you here, so take/leave whatever you will!
First let me address the teacher issue. Dameon has had some TERRIBLE teachers. His 2nd grade teacher was the WORST! She was just intolerant of him on every level! I was unaware until the year after that you can request a change of class/teacher at any time and the school has to comply. Atleast, in IL. If only I'd known! It is pretty late in the year to do this now, it would probably only disrupt him worse, and it sounds like its more of a school homework policy than a teacher one, since you said it happened last year too?
As far as being right there helping him with his HW, BE CAREFUL! It sounds like you have quite the intelligent kiddo there, and its entirely possible he is somehow weaseling you into doing more of his HW for him than you realize! My son likes to do that to me. If I end up helping him, say with math, more than I feel comfortable with walking him through the problems, then once we are finished, I make up 2-5 new problems of the same type for him to do ON HIS OWN to prove he understands the concept. That works great for math, not so much for reading.
Time management:
This may be the majority of the issue. Maybe he just doesnt have anything else he'd rather be doing? Maybe the time he's spending with you focusing on him and his HW is the highlight of his day? Not by ANY means suggesting that you dont spend time or lavish attention on him at other points in the day! Kids just see things differently than we do - I have a couple suggestions on how to get him to do homework solo, hopefully one will work BUT you will have to be firm with him about how involved you will be.
1) Make it a race. Tell him you want him to do as much of his homework as he can before you finish doing the dishes (or some other mundane chore that youd rather not be doing either). Tell him as soon as one of you finishes, the other one can take a break. If he seems to be going slowly waiting on you to finish cuz there arent too many dishes, then the next day pull out EVERY mixing bowl, spoon, glass, whatever, and set them on the counter, and pretend you have to wash all those too and you REALLY want him to finish first! (lord dont actually wash them all though haha)
2) 30 minute intervals - sit with him and help him with his work for 30 minutes, then tell him you want him to try the next (x number of problems) on his own. If you finished 8 problems in that 30 minutes, ask him to 5 on his own in the next 30 minutes, something reasonable, and then you will come back and help again.
3) convince a friend to call you while youre in the middle of helping him so you have to walk away to take the call, and ask him to keep working while you deal with it.


Those are just a couple things to maybe try to get him started feeling confident enough to do his work on his own so you dont feel trapped and like youre losing your whole day doing his HW.
More specific to your current homework load,
Maybe with 3 worksheets, try doing 1 together, "letting" him do the 2nd on his own while you start dinner, and coming back to check while he does the 3rd - then take a break, make spelling words a fun dinnertime activity where you test him on his words, and then let him come up with whatever crazy long words he can think up for you and dad to try to spell, and do some reading together at bedtime. If he has to like read a passage then answer some questions, do the reading together like a night time story, then ask him the questions and after he answers each one, have him write it out.
Kids are never happy to do homework but it can be easier - just have to take a deep breath, remember he comes to you for help because he trusts you and loves you, and do the best you can to teach him the tools he'll need in the future to get through it on his own.
Good luck! Hope some of this (ridiculously long) post helps!

Vicky - posted on 03/30/2011

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I have problems with my 10 year old with this and the only thing I found that worked was no tea till its done I know its extreme but it worked after 3 days and she does it now with no fuss as soon as she comes home with any. Other things to consider are does he understand what he has to do as teachers go so fast with things that kids get left behind unintentionally and then can't pick up something that is related to it in the future. Have you spoken to his teacher about how much he gets or if she/he can spend a little time with him to help him out more. Also does your son have any hearing/sight problems that are hindering him at school and he is unsure and needs you right next to him to tell him what to do. Hope some of these help to get something started for him x

Elizabeth - posted on 04/03/2011

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i have a similiar situation with my 8 yr old. he is adhd and is tired after the long school day. the best thing that i've found to work for us, is if we have a large project due, we space it out over a week or 2. if it's something due the next day, i try to make a game out of it, make it fun for him. we take frequent breaks, and yes it does take around 3 hours to get it all done. i am right there with him, doing his homework as well. it's hard to have the patience, but just pace yourself as well. my husband and i try to swap off with homework duties, but it does usually end up being me doing more of the work. i try to put myself back in my son's place, look at things from his view. i know he is still pretty young and struggling with certain subjects and sometimes, just flat doesn't want to do homework when he would rather be playing!!:) i hope this helps in some way, i feel in time with mine it will get easier.

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Shanna - posted on 04/04/2011

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u are welcome that's how i got my 4 kids and the 4 yr old to do all their chores

Shannintipton - posted on 04/04/2011

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Hi Shanna,
I like the way you think. He loves Wii games. Thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

Shanna - posted on 04/04/2011

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if he likes video games bargain with him. Get him a 10 dollar game stop card. Every time he does his homework add one point (a dollar ) to it. Everytime he doesn't deduct a dollar. The good games are usually like 34 dollars or so. So if he keeps getting points he could have new releases based on the monetary value of the card. Let the card be the only way he gets games for the Wii don't not cave in.

Shannintipton - posted on 04/04/2011

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Hi Elizabeth,
I will try anything. Thanks for the input{:+)
shannin tipton

Elizabeth - posted on 04/04/2011

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of course:) good luck! yeah, it's something we get mon and due on friday. on the weeks they only have 4 days sometimes they make it shorter or they won't have one. and trust me, i'm def not a perfect mom, i have my struggles and downfalls. my 8 yr old is my oldest, i also have a 6 yr old-anna who is in kindergarten and a 3 yr old-jesse who hasn't started school yet. so it's hard to juggle between working with my daughter(who only gets a weekly letter page and a simple reading sheet) and john. i thought of another thing too that we do, sometimes we use coins, cheerios or other stuff on our math homework. you could even set up a reward chart for him, i dunno if this is something that would def work..but find something that gets him motivated-my kids love stickers..have him put a sticker up when he completes his homework, if he does it without a struggle(wishful thinking!!) reward him with a trip to the park, or just something he enjoys doing. let him know that the sooner you guys can get homework done, the sooner he may have time for other things before bed and such. :) hope this helps and best of luck to you both!

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Tarina,
Thank you for spending so much time on my problem. There are some excellent ideas. I will definitely try them. I am getting so many great ideas.

But he didnt have any problems
with his homework or grades last year. As a matter of fact he was an excellent student, so much so they put him in an ex-cell-er-rated 2/3 grade combo class. I have met his teacher many time regarding this situation along with parent-teacher conferences. I think the biggest problem is that it is so annoying that neither one of us look forward to it. So making it fun seems to be the best solution for now. Thank you for all your time and effort. thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Nichole,

I'm sorry, are you asking me? Because I have no clue. The only thing I can suggest is looking at some of the posts on this site. Some sound really good. But good luck with that. Three? Ugh. Your a stronger women than I. :+)

shannin tipton

Nichole - posted on 04/03/2011

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I have 3 kids, thats 3 times the arguing! My pre schooler refuses to write letters, my kindy isn't too bad with his work but my 2nd grader is UGH! Wrighting assignments are the worst. Suggestions for getting them to write?! Thanks

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Ruth,
Thanks for the additional information. That is good to know. I am working on it different ideas that I have received and cant wait to try them out. thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

Ruth E. - posted on 04/03/2011

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Another thing you could do is find out through the board of education if the curriculum for your son's school has changed because that could be another major factor into why he takes so long with his homework because I for one use to work as a teacher aide for the schools in Buffalo,NY & believe me the curriculum tends to change basically every semester because the superintendent of schools is trying to get the students there to learn more & not be so far behind than in other states... just remember time & patience can make a huge difference

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Ruth,
I agree, it just feels like a lot because it takes us both so long to do it. I have received a lot of great suggestions for tricks or methods of making it easier to do. I would die if my 8 year got as much homework as your 6 year old. I just thought it was a lot until I've heard other moms tell me the amount of homework they are getting. I am a little embarrassed now. But the tips will still come in handy, thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

Ruth E. - posted on 04/03/2011

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Shannin, I don't think that's alot my 6 yr. old gets 4 spelling worksheets, 2 math, & reading every day & during holidays it's a homework packet of at least 30 pages then there's my wonderful 9 yr. old who barely gets any homework & when he does it takes him over 5 hours to get it done because he wants to do everything else but his homework so I get them both at the table to do their homework together because my 6 yr. old understands my 9 yr. old's homework better

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Elizabeth,
I just re-read your first post and I too have problems with Tyler's penmanship, it is horrible. I figure in a couple of years everything will be done over the computer anyways so I dont worry about that so much. (However the teacher does)

It also sounds like you get packet work. (Receive it on Monday and due on Friday) Our homework is due daily. Which I dont like because some nights are really busy. Sounds like your doing a great job. thanks and wish me luck? {:+)
shannin tipton

Elizabeth - posted on 04/03/2011

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you're welcome:) we use incentives for things. i mean like i said, we have more to deal with since he is adhd. major issue is impulse control or lack of! we have a movie night every friday night with them. if he has gotten into trouble at school, i take his d.s. away from him and depending on how his home behavior and school behavior is i take the movie night away as well. but yeah, i try to read things out to him in a silly voice sometimes to make it fun. also, he cracks up when i dance to things, because you know mom can't dance. lol. just a good break to be fun is always good for them and helps to see frustration gone.

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Elizabeth,
It helps to know I am not alone. I will give the "lets make it fun" a try, but honestly I m not very creative. But will see. Thanks for the suggestion{:+) shannin tipton

Elizabeth - posted on 04/03/2011

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our homework is as follows(2nd grade,public school here in tx)- 1 hw packet ,usually about 4 pages long..spelling list and that's it. we work on one,sometimes 2 of the hw packet sheets a day,depending on what it is. and then work on the spelling list throughout the week. the main problem we have now is his handwriting. it's gotten very sloppy and i lose patience trying with him to get his writing to be legible.

Shannintipton - posted on 04/03/2011

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Hi Or-Tal,
Thank you..... I think it is a lot too. Other mothers have horror stories regarding the amount they have to deal with. I agree it should be fun. They do one page that is a logic problem page. They are required to do it but is not included in their grades. I always comes back the next day with a star on it and never turned in to the teacher. A class mate grades it. The rest of the homework is NOT fun. I am looking forward to checking out the websites. Thank you so much for your research and input{:+)
shannin tipton

Or-Tal - posted on 04/03/2011

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"3 worksheets, a pre-spelling test, a pre-math quiz and reading." - ???
That's a lot!!
My kid, if and when he gets homework, would in most cases not exceed the 2 worksheet... He won't have patience for more.
I've been into a debate with educators about homework - those have to be needed, necessary, helpful and valued. Only too often they are given as a traditional ingredient on school and nothing more.
Does a 2nd grader really needs that much homework?
Is his success or ability to understand or progress dependent on these homework?
Does the teacher check each student's homework and grade it? Is it values and appreciated in class?
Is there anything creative in his homework - something he may actually enjoy while doing it??
**My kid is nearly 9. He is a native Hebrew speaker. They start teaching English as a second language here at 2nd grade. Only he progressed really fast. So I often let him visit brainpopesl.com where he studies and practices and it's light and fun. As he progressed through that he started to visit brainpop.com and watch small movies about topics he is interested in. Now this is valuable homework - he is learning AND enjoying every minute of it. As long as I see he is doing a learning I am not particularly worried about the homework that the teacher is giving him. I don't care how good and perfect he is doing it.
My impression is that the best thing you can do for your son is first of all put a lot more fun into learning, and reduce the pressure of homework (even if it means alerting his teacher to YOUR decision).
I would have suggested to go check for learning disabilities - those can show up at any time and have various degrees and types. But from what you wrote it seems more like "teaching disabilities" - that seems like a lot of homework.

Joy - posted on 03/31/2011

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No problem Shannin. :) My response was "colored" by my personal experience.
Maybe simply being in the room, but doing a different task would indeed help, as you mention in your response. I do wish you the best!

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL OF YOU FOR YOUR RESPONSES. I TRULY APPRECIATE IT. {:+)
shannin tipton
a.k.a. "You"

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Joy,

And as much as I would love to blame the teacher for this, I cant. It is his own procrastination or rather mine, that is the problem. I would love to send him to a private school, but you know.... He did go to Montessori in the beginning, but we could only do that for so long. Please dont hate me because you spent a lot of time and effort into your response, but this is what he gets. 3 worksheets, a pre-spelling test, a pre-math quiz and reading. It really isnt that much. We just need to figure out a good system that works for both of us. 1) we both dont want to do it. 2) he wants me to sit right there with him 3) I dont want to sit there with him. I would rather be in the same room but on the computer or something. . . . And I think that is it. This is every night however except Fridays. They dont get homework over the weekend. There are book reports and special exams once in a while. Sooooooooooo away, in all honesty it shouldnt be that big of a deal, BUT it is. I am getting a lot of good advice and thank you too.{:+)

shannin tipton

Joy - posted on 03/31/2011

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I may get dogpiled for this, but I honestly feel that 3 hours worth of homework is really excessive for an 8 year old, whether it's his procrastination or not.
In 1st grade, my daughter was getting literally 15 pages of homework a week. By the time we got home, ate, did any household chores, she had roughly an hour-ish to do her homework. Frequently, she did not finish it, even if I worked with her directly & we worked as quickly as we could. I was quite vocal to her teacher about how I felt about the excessive amount, but when she moved on to second grade, nothing changed as far as the amount. She even started slipping grade-wise in school because the task was so onerous and repetitive to her. We ended up having to move her to a private school (with a 60% scholarship), where she has to do very little homework, if any. Funny thing... now she has such a tiny amount of homework & yet she is excelling in her academic skills, going from "See Spot Run" levels of reading to chapter books literally within 2 months or so. And she went from barely understanding addition to multiplication just as quickly.
I'm not suggesting you put your son in a private school - it's not practical for most families. However, I would respectfully suggest at least a review of the homework practices with his teacher. I don't personally feel tossing so much homework at a child this age is really such a smart idea.

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Teresa,
That is an enteresting question . . . . "What is his take on this?" I guess it depends on the day. What more can I say. But somehow, I feel better now. thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

[deleted account]

I guess just 'tough it out' til the end of the year. That's probably what I would do. I would WANT to get him moved out of her class, but I'm too chicken to 'make waves'...

Hang in there! If your husband is not supporting you on this.... what is HIS take on the situation?

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Teresa, I shouldn't really take up your time but I have talked her a couple of time not including parent-teacher conferences. I even suggested that he be switched to a different class. He is in a 2-3 grade combo. It doesn't seem to be working for him. He did great last year. Grant it, he is only in the second grade, but I am afraid this could hurt his self-esteem. But both her and my husband looked at me like I was from another planet. I get that a lot. Anyway school is almost out and he will not be in her class next year. wow i feel better. Anyway we will talk with her once again. thanks for listening{:+)
shannin tipton

[deleted account]

A good teacher should be willing to work WITH you for the sake of your child. Try sitting down w/ her and asking if it would be possible for him to move to a seat closer to the board. If she isn't willing to work w/ you then I think it is important to speak to the principal or school guidance counselor on what else you can do. Is there another class for his grade at that school?

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Thanks Teresa, its going to take me a minute to digest what you have written. I know we have done some of the things you suggested. We did the timer thing and I have to think back and remember why that didnt work. I will look over your post and retry some of the ideas. As far as the teacher not moving him closer. I dont know? I dont like her but what can I do about it. What if ALL the students needed to be moved up to the front of the class. So anyway you have giving me some more ideas to think about. thanks{:+)

shannin tipton

[deleted account]

What is the delay in getting the glasses? If she knows he can not see the board and won't move him closer.... you need to speak to the principal about it.

For the homework issue.... try setting a timer for 15 minutes that you will sit w/ him. IF he is working on his homework the entire time... you will sit w/ him until he is done (unless he starts messing around). If you have to tell him more than once to get to work.... when the timer goes off, you get up and drop the fight (but he isn't allowed to do anything but sit there or read quietly until the work is done). If he doesn't get his homework done at home... he can do it during recess.

I don't fight over homework. School is their job. If they aren't doing their job.... they can suffer the consequences that their 'boss' (the teacher) has for them.

That is all assuming you haven't tried that approach, of course. :)

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Or-Tal? We have talked with his teacher a couple of times and there are some issues that I should have mentioned. He can't see the board clearly. He can see it but he does need glasses. The teacher had just moved him to the back of the room right before parent-teacher conference. How ironic. We mentioned the glasses thing to her and she still has not moved him closer. Which I have mixed feelings about because it isn't really her problem that he needs glasses. But for this, I dont like her (right or wrong) I just do not click with her. She has stated that no it should not take three hours to do his homework. I totally agree with that. So other than the glasses, I am at a loss. I have received some good advice through this post and would love any suggestions you may have. thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

Or-Tal - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Shannin, I think this is a matter to solve with his teacher. Homework should never take that long at his age. There could be many reasons for what you're describing, and many possible solutions. When my not--much-older refused to do his homework I took it up with his teacher and she said "that's OK. Don't pressure him into doing it, eventually he will because he will want to be like the rest of his class". He still doesn't like to do homework, but he does it regularly and no conversation is needed. On the other hand, his homework is usually somewhere between 10-30 minutes. The longest we ever had to put into it was an hour for a special project they were given for a holiday. So I do think you should start by discussing with his teacher and let her/him come up with ideas and suggestions first.
I have much more information to give - but that would be better to do after the teacher's feedback.

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Melissa, regarding not doing homework. I think there might be a couple of good ideas in this post. Some I have tried and some not (so I will). Maybe you can find something that might help you. Good luck, we need it.{:+)
shannin tipton

Shannintipton - posted on 03/31/2011

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Hi Cody. I am so happy for you, but I have tried that too. Good idea though. Maybe that will work on my little girl. thanks for the advice{:+)
shannin tipton

Melissa - posted on 03/31/2011

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i'm in the same vote.. my little boy is in first grade.. he has an attitude towards homework.. every afternoon after school it always turns into an argument.. he is a very bright and intellegent little boy, but he just doesn't apply himself.. unfortunately i have no suggestions cause i am pretty much doing what you are doing taking away all his privledges and it still doesn't work.. I hope there is someone out there that can help us. Good Luck

Shannintipton - posted on 03/30/2011

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Hi Kolbee, and yes we have had him sit the whole time. That's why it takes 3 hours. We have tried one page at a time with breaks in between which did help a little. We have sat with him (that drives me crazy). We have also set up a desk in his room so he can sit by himself with no distractions. I was out of ideas. However I am getting some good one now. thanks{:+)

shannin tipton

Kolbee - posted on 03/30/2011

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do u make him sit down the whole time til its done,if u dont try that .it might be long and drawn out at first but if u dont give in he should get real tired of sitting there everyday

Ruth E. - posted on 03/30/2011

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trust me when he does that you'll feel this huge weight just roll off your shoulder because he learned a new thing

Ruth E. - posted on 03/30/2011

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I know exactly how you feel it's a very time consuming job but at the end of the day it feels good to see that baby of yours look at you & say thanks Mommy

Shannintipton - posted on 03/30/2011

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Thanks Ruth, I will try that too. I am getting lots of good advice. I should have done this a long time ago. {:+)
shannin tipton

Ruth E. - posted on 03/30/2011

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I suggest that you try & make homework time a game because I go through that with my 9 yr old & sometimes my 6 yr.old tries to pull a fast one on me to get me frustrated so hubby & I figured if we make a game out of it they would do it & sure enough now both are doing it & they enjoy the fun time we all spend during homework

[deleted account]

Weird. I can't find it either.



My 7 yr old 2nd grader refused to do his schoolwork without a fight since kindergarten. In kindergarten, it wasn't as bad, but it has gotten worse every year. In October he was diagnosed with ADD, inattentive type. Medication helped a little, but not enough. There were days he told me he couldn't do his work. He didn't know why, just that he couldn't. IQ testing in his ADD evaluation showed his IQ to be very high, so it isn't because he's not smart. I spent hours standing over him or sitting with him urging him to write 3 more words. Reading was just as bad. When we made him do his reading homework, he complained of headaches. I saw this article:



http://kaaltv.com/article/stories/S19406...



and I took him to the nearest behavior optometrist. At first I was doubtful that it was vision because he got glasses when he was 2 1/2, and he has seen 3 different ophthalmologists many times since then. I was wrong. Turns out he needed bifocals because his single prescription in his glasses was perfect for far vision but not near vision. His eye strain was causing him to slightly cross his eyes. That caused him to lose vision in his left eye in kindergarten, and we had to patch the right eye to strengthen the left. The left eye is nearly normal now, so the slight crossing made each eye see different images. It would make you see double to cross your eyes, but in him, since it was such a long standing problem, his brain had adapted and apparently accepts input from only one eye at a time in the near range. So one eye is seeing the beginning of the sentence, and the other is seeing somewhere in the middle or the end. It makes it impossible for him to track his eyes across the page. He got his bifocals 2 weeks ago, and he's a different kid. Last week I noticed he was really quiet and went to check on him, and he was reading a book! He has read 3 stories to his little brother. He is so proud of his new ability to read and he is now willing to read and write. He is doing vision therapy to retrain his brain to use both eyes together, so reading should continue to improve for him. My son's problem turned out to be the opposite of the problem the article described. The article is about kids whose eyes turn outward slightly. Both problems have the same result: the eyes see 2 different things at the same time and the brain compensates by only accepting input from one eye at a time or shutting down vision to one eye in order to avoid seeing double. If a kid has seen things this way his whole life, he does not know his vision is not normal. It is what he has always had. It is rare for these kids to complain that they see double.



There are other things about my kid (before the bifocals) that would probably be typical of a kid with this problem:

He wouldn't play games that involve catching a ball or anything else. He couldn't track movement of things in the near range at all. We were doing a coin flip one day, and he got so frustrated because he couldn't throw the coin in the air and catch it. He tried to string some beads once, but after 3 beads was so frustrated, he threw a fit and quit. If any of these types of things fit your kid, I would google "vision therapy" and find an optometrist who provides it. There aren't many, but they can really help. The down side to this is that vision therapy isn't cheap, and no insurance covers it. Our ophthalmologist never referred us for it because the American Academy of Ophthalmology's offical stance is that it does not work, and ophthalmologists are trained to believe that. But optometrists say it does work. It's similar to the cost of braces. For the change I am seeing in my kid, I think it's priceless.



Prior to finding out about the behavior optometrist, we tried something else. It was somewhat helpful, but we were not treating the primary problem. We took our son to see Dr. Harold Levinson (google his name) in Great Neck, New York. It was an expensive trip, but we learned a lot about our son there. He made the connection between headaches and reading for us. He treats kids with dyslexia and ADHD and other learning disorders. His book, "Smart But Feeling Dumb" is useful to see if your son sounds like a kid he could help. He believes that these learning disorders are all caused by a problem with the inner ear. The testing that he did revealed that my son had significant problems tracking and met his criteria for diagnosis of dyslexia, though my son has never had problems with reversing letters or reading words like "saw" as "was". Now that we know about the vision problem, we understand why he couldn't track things visually. The inner ear treatment did help, just not as much as the right glasses did.



Good luck with your son's problems. I hope you find the answers that help you very soon.

Shannintipton - posted on 03/30/2011

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Hi Janna. Am I missing something. Where is the conversation? I would be interested to read it. thanks{:+)
shannin tipton

[deleted account]

We used to have this exact problem! I just started a new conversation about it. It's kinda long, but it might help you.

Vicky - posted on 03/30/2011

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Good luck. Another to try is time limit for you to sit with him so he may just get on with it quicker. Kids can be very sneaky when it comes to getting our attention and sometimes saying no more is the only way to stop it or at least slow it down! lol Anyway its good to see he not got any problems that are making it hard for him to get on in life. Good luck again hope it settles soon. x

Shannintipton - posted on 03/30/2011

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Hi Vicky, I will try that. As far as talking with his teacher, I have. We have an understanding that if I dont sign a signuature sheet given daily, he will stay in at recess and finish the homework that wasn't done the night before. I hate to do that. He also understands the assignments, better than I do. He needs very little help (if then I refer him to his dad, because he is smarter than I am). He basically wants me to sit there while he dilly-dallies around. It is so frustrating I could scream. I will try your suggestion. thanks. wish me luck{:+)

shannin tipton

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