Anybody has a better way to teaching your kindergarden to read?

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Angie - posted on 04/30/2010

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The more you read to your kindergartener, the more they will want to learn to read and the harder they will work at it. A few years ago I found the old Dick and Jane books and my daughter who was pre-k loved them. They were the first books she read. It's really about practice, practice, practice.....

Ilene - posted on 05/02/2010

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Read Read Read to your child. Does your school have Accelerated Reader? That was a huge help to my child. It is a reading system where you read a book and then answer questions about it. My son did have a jump start because we read to him since he was born but any child can learn. Most of the children in my son's kindergarten class are reading to some extent but it really does vary.

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Shanetta - posted on 09/30/2012

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I have used the one tool that worked for my children. Leapster this is a reader that teaching them how to read.

Diana - posted on 09/26/2012

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I have one child who is a natural reader and one who isn't. The one who loves to read was reading leveled readers in K or Grade one. The one who isn't didn't become a solid reader until Grade 4. Take your time. And don't worry, but take every opportunity to read, read, read to them!

Sandra - posted on 09/26/2012

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There is now several people/places in our area offering this type of specialized tutoring. This wasn't an option when my son was young. I used sylvan for about a year. As a teacher, I know that children will do things for others that they won't do for parents. It was very expensive it was the same amount each month as my house payment but it was worth it.



I currently tutor other children. I have several home schooled children enrolled. I only have a BS. I charge $20 per hour and we meet at the library. Reading is the most common area for younger children that need tutoring.



My decision to home school was not based on my desire to teach my son myself, but to provide an alternative to what he was being offered at school. I knew nothing about home schooling when we started. It worked out great. The school refused to provide his speech therapy while he was homeschooling which was a blessing. He started private speech therapy at a rehab center two hours a week through our insurance. It was so superior to the school's and it was one on one instead of being grouped with other children.

Tara - posted on 09/26/2012

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My son and I always read together . This year he started school but it is a play based program.. although he has always been read to I now make him read to me I teach him one word a day and he spells it back to me.. The Scout Draw and Play Letters has been fantastic.. He already knows what the letters look like and is starting to draw them... I love Scout !!!

Jenny - posted on 09/26/2012

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Sandra, I just read your post about how you home schooled your son who had dyslexia. I am a certified reading specialist in Houston with a masters in education in reading and writing. I have also completed the dyslexia practitioner preparation program and am working on my hours to become state certified as a dyslexia therapist.

I have been interested in working with struggling readers during the day while my own two children are in school. I would like to check with the homeschooling community here in Houston to see if parents would be willing to allow a dyslexia specialist to work with their child, or if most homeschooling parents would prefer to try to teach their dyslexic child themselves, as you did.

Would you mind sharing your thoughts on this with me? I would just like to get a better insight as to what my chances would be in working with the homeschooling community.

Thanks so much for your help!!

Sandra - posted on 09/26/2012

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I taught two of my children to read write and spell when they were 4 years old. When they started kindergarten they were reading writing and spelling at a second grade level. By the end of kindergarten, they were reading chapter books. It is important to remember that not all children can read at 4 or 5 years old. Some children are not physically ready to read. There is a chemical in the brain that doesn't develop for some children until they are 6 that is essential for learning how to read. There could also be other problems. I had a child between these that could not even learn his alphabet before kindergarten and he had a very late birthday. I knew there was a problem and I did not push him. He did not know all of his alphabet by the end of kindergarten either despite working with a one on one aide daily and with me three afternoons a week. As the kindergarten teacher and I suspected, he had dyslexia and several other learning disabilities. I did end up homeschooling him for several years when he was in the 2nd grade. I taught him how to read and spell but it was by trial and error and it was very difficult and a little frustrating for both of us.



I had already taught my children the alphabet and letter sounds. I taught mine how to read write and spell at the same time. I used the cardboard letter tiles from the scrabble junior game, but you can make your own. I used word families. We started with the -at family. I taught them at first we practiced both sounds and blended them together. Then I placed various letters in front of the -at to make words. They would add the beginning sound. Once they could tell me all of the words. I would tell them a word and they would make it with the tiles. We worked our way through all of the word families then we worked on other words. We did this 5-20 minutes in the evening. We also read a lot of books. Once they knew quite a few words I found books that included these words and let them read to me. This was a great way to practice and to build vocabulary and fluency.

Hope - posted on 09/26/2012

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There's a child in my son's preschool who didn't even talk last year. Over the summer his parents taught him how to read and from what I've heard is they used a flashcard system. It takes a lot of patience and repetition. Probably putting nametags on things in your house would help too, and like other mom's have said- reading to them A LOT will encourage it.

Sophia - posted on 09/21/2012

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I BUY BOOKS ABOUT THE SHOWS MY SON WATCH. AND I READ ALOT AND MY HUSBAND READS ALOT ALSO. AND I READ AT NIGHT WHEN WE ARE IN BED. SOME NIGHTS HE READS TO ME ... I HELP OUT WITH THE WORDS HE DONT KNOW.

Juanita - posted on 08/19/2012

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"Easyread by Oxford Learning Systems". This is an online program that uses imaginative synthetic phonics to help struggling children learn how to read. It is specially optimized for dyslexic children and highly visual learners. They also explain the 7 main reasons some children have difficulty learning to read.

This program has helped our two children by using lessons that are less than 15 minutes per day 4 to 5 days per week. We have been using it since Mid March and now there is no more crying! Instead, our children are now want to read on their own. They still need help but are I see a huge difference! I wholeheartedly recommend this program!

For more information you can email me at jjmueller1@verizon.net or visit their website. (If you decide to use the program you can get 10% off if you have a referral--Just use JuanitaMueller as a referral)

Erin - posted on 07/29/2012

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-Go to your library's children's hour...or if they don't have one make a point of going once a week and letting your child explore the books and pick one for the two of you to read together. Your library might also have a DVD version of popular children's books.

-Read together every night (even if it's the comics).

-Play audio books in the car.

-Go to websites such as Story Nory, Storyline, AOL Kids and use their animated books.

-If you have an Ipad there are apps that build early reading skills, phonics, alphabet id, etc...

-Once your child knows all letters and sounds (basics, not digrapghs or dipthongs) print off flashcards "pop corn words" (words your child should know before 1st grade).

Linda - posted on 07/23/2012

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Hi Everyone,
In light of the national campaign to improve early childhood education and the new common core state standards recently adopted by virtually all 50 states, I wanted to share a wonderful new and unique alphabet book that is due out sometime in August: ALPHABET ANATOMY: MEET THE CAPITAL LETTERS. This book presents a rhyming verse and heartwarming illustration for each capital letter, providing a visual of each letter's sound and shape, thus teaching children how to write the letter as well as its sound -- critical skills in acquiring reading proficiency! Alphabet Anatomy was created by a mom and her son! Please check out the website at alphabetanatomy.com and like on Facebook.

Robin Jane - posted on 05/07/2012

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Your doing fine lol.. Not to worry..
My child wasn`t interested in reading at that age either, but he liked being read to. Sometimes I used to just get my son interacting with the book by playing games like, for instance on any one of pages, we would play eye spy ,I would say for example. " let`s see if we can find the yellow cat " It could have been anything within the story.
I noticed with my kids I had to make fun games out of alot of things , don`t worry too much though, the kids will pick it up when they are ready to.
As long as we continue reading to them they`ll get the hang of it.

Denese - posted on 04/30/2012

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My son is 4.5 years old and he is a fantastic reader. He started learning his phonics at the tender age of one (on his own with his older brother's alphabetic leapfrog refrigerator magnet). At 2, he demanded a lot from me because he wanted to learn to read at a fast pace. The problem was that his demand was mainly when I was helping his older brother with his LOTS of homework. I decided to research a reading program for him to free up my time but still have him engaged. I found the most fantastic reading program ever (my opinion and his). It is called abc reading eggs. He is reading at a second grade level now and although he is finished all the lessons, the site had so much more that after 2 years it is still keeping him happy and yes he is easily bored. I highly, highly recommend it. He is using another great program now but honestly that one is the best for young child that I have come across and I have researched many. You can see him on you tube reading at 3.4 years old. Just look up Nathaniel reading at a 6 year old level.

Jennifer - posted on 04/26/2012

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check out www.FirstStepReading.com

That's the website I used. It is free. It has FREE animated videos that teach the lessons that children need to know in order to read. (Alphabet recognition, Letter sounds, Putting Sounds together, Phonics, Sight Words, Long vowels......)

Chelanne - posted on 04/19/2012

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Better than what approach? In my 20 years involved in education, I am a strong believer in phonics. Sight words are great suppliment to phonics, but it should not be the way to teach to read. There are lots of phonics programs. My children's school used the spaulding program.

http://spalding.org/store/instructional....

I loved the way the flashcards drill the sounds for each letter. My children did this system at school practicing the sound with the sign language letter for motion. At the end of kindergarten, both kids were reading basic Dr. Seuss books. The school did not push reading, just learning phonics that year. Then, I practiced by allowing them to read to me each night once I saw their readiness.

My blog highlights many books ideal for early readers and makes suggestions for how to maximize literacy opportunities.

http://www.books4learning.blogspot.com/

Good Luck!

Carol - posted on 05/10/2010

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Hooked on Phonics is incredible!!!! We homeschooled my sons last year when my youngest was in kindergarten. He began the year not knowing the full alphabet and ended the year completing the 7 year series!!! That's K-6th grade. They went back into public school and academically he's done phenomenal. The Hooked on Phonics allows you to pace yourself. We only worked on reading about 30 minutes a day (if that), so even in addition to public school it shouldn't be overwhelming. The books are very child appropriate and build on themselves. I found the K-2 set at Big Lots for only about $25. The 3-6 set was under $120 I think on amazon.com Well, well worth it.

I am a firm believer that kids will "get" reading when they're ready. They won't be damaged for life if kindergarten isn't their year. They will have to work extra hard in the rest of their subjects until they get it though because a basic reading ability is needed for instructions in the other subjects - it sucks, but it's life.
Good luck

Betty - posted on 05/09/2010

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I love your insight Teaching them to read by having them sound out words and use the phonics concepts will give them more confident and they will be light years ahead of children that are taught whole language. Good for you!

Betty - posted on 05/06/2010

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I am happy to hear your daughter is so excited about reading. While Hooked on phonics is a great resource . Try looking into Readina a-z It give you downloadable books that gives the child a chance to assocaited the sounds withthe word patterms. For instance in the book a Tap for Pat. The word family At is used in a variety of ways. As a reading teacher I use a lot of multi sensory strategies when teaching them to read. Check out a book How Jill Learned to Read Using Phonics.

[deleted account]

My 5 year old will be going to Public Kindergarten this year from being at a private Pre-K. She asked if she could learn to read and luckily she got Hooked on Phonics for her birthday from one of her friends from school. It's a program that lets them go at their own pace. It's great for kids who are self motivated... and it's also good for teaching me patience! LOL! I highly recomend it. You can find it at Hookedonphonics.com or even cheaper on Ebay. Best of luck to you!

Tiffany

Melinda - posted on 05/05/2010

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you will have to practice sounding out each letter and har your child put the sounds together. my dauther is 5 and in k she reads by sounding out the letters and putting them togher. if u find books with which repeat the same words more then once she will learn that way. ood luck

Cheryl - posted on 05/05/2010

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All of this is true. I read with my kids everyday and my son has come a long way this year in reading. Every kid is different. Just like learning to walk or anything else...it will just come together one day and you will be amazed. Don't stress about it. Your child will be an awesome reader in no time and you will be VERY proud to have them read to everyone!

Betty - posted on 05/05/2010

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Dear Nora, I am so excited to be part of the circle of moms group. My children are both grown now hand have children of their own. I taught both of my children to read before they entered Kindergarten. I also have been teaching children to read for ten years. The best part about teaching children to read is to have fun. Get a cd by Jean Anderson Sing to Learn. Teach your child the sounds of the letters. Once he or she knows the sounds you can start showing your kindergärtner simple word families. At cat bat fat continuing with all the short vowels. Do fun activities that will encourage your child to want to learn to read.sensory techniques you can checkout my website if you like at http://www.funwithphonicstutoring.net/

[deleted account]

Our local public school teaches reading in Kindergarten as well. We homeschool, and I am homeschooling Kindergarten (my daughter is 5) and she is reading. As I said before we used Hooked on Phonics. I don't think teaching to read in K is for every child. Not all kids are ready to learn to read. I have a degree in Early Childhood Education, and believe it or not, in some of my classes they are teaching future teachers that kids are ready to learn how to read in Preschool! As Lisa said, "This is why we homeschool".

Lesley - posted on 05/05/2010

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Prior to homeschooling my daughter she was required to write a 4-5 sentence paragraph, be able to read all her sight words and spell them. While her frustration level was extreme at times, she managed to pull it off and was reading at a third grade level by the time kinder was done. All I can say is...take your time and be patient. It will "click" one day and your child will be reading like crazy. We still read together every night for 20-30 min and my children will even read to me many nights. Create a reading time. Ours is after bath time and we all sit on mom/dad's bed with our books and read to each other.
Also, when my kids struggled with the "sight" words, we took post it notes and wrote words on them to create our own sight words. (for example, chair - and then stuck it on the chair. Wall - and stuck it on the wall. Bathroom - and stuck it in the bathroom) This became a game with my kids and they tried to out-do each other. They started making sticky notes themselves and spelled out words phonetically to see if the other could read it. We still use this game today with our homeschooling.

Lisa - posted on 05/05/2010

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I ditto Sylvia!



Kids taught to read in Kindergarten? Why? What is up with that? Hummmmm, that is why we homeschool.............................

Carmel - posted on 05/04/2010

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Practice daily, also making sure your child learns how to soud out letters this will help a great deal. Talking about what they are reading is always help they will first know words by memory but then cover up the pics and they will soon read the words. Dick and Jane books are good. Scholastic has some books a set that stays are certain words and then moves forward. My son is 5 he was reading Mat Sat last summer never been to school. Daily reading is the best. You all can do it!!!!!!

Sherri - posted on 05/04/2010

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Sylvia all our kids are taught to read in kindergarten and if t they can't they can not advance to first grade.

My advice is make flash cards with all the sight words which you can get off the internet. Besides sounding out a lot of reading is memorization.

Theresa - posted on 05/04/2010

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I think its most important develop a love for reading. So read, read, read to her. Let her see you enjoy reading.

Brenda - posted on 05/04/2010

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read to your child, make it fun by emphasizing certain words. I think at that age, the sight words are the important thing. Visit a bookstore or library together, making reading fun from the beginning. Let them see you read, and hear from you how much fun reading can be. Let them know you love books.

Catherine Pradhan - posted on 05/03/2010

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Post a reply!

Follow the fonetics, sound of the letters & join the sounds. Get the copies of Oxford Reading Circle by Nicholas Horsburgh. log on www.oup.co.in or www.infibeam.com

All the best.

Catherine Pradhan Lobo

Kel - posted on 05/03/2010

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Hey, Sylvia...I used to think the same way until my daughter started kindergarten...Here in Texas kindergartners must be able to read about 100 sight words before they are allowed to advance to first grade...Nora, like everyone else said, read to your child...also check with the teacher to find out what techniques are being used at your school. I was astonished to find out that they were not using phonics as a teaching method. Once I started using it with my daughter at home she picked right up on it and was reading very well by the time she hit first grade.

[deleted account]

We homeschool, and we used Hooked on Phonics for our 5 yr old. I took our time, and let her decide when we were moving up. She loved it! She would work really hard to finish her lessons because she knew she could get a new book. It worked for us!

Karen - posted on 05/01/2010

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Kids will learn to read at their own pace. I just had a conversation with our librarian who said that it is not uncommon for about half of a class to be complete non-readers in K, limited readers in 1, and then finally "get it" by 2. Just encourage reading what interests the child. Mine devours books and her interests fluctuate from week to week. But we've always read to her and read around her. She went from reading simple books by herself (elephant & piggy, pigeon, the puppy books) to reading Magic School Bus, Dinosaurs, and American Girl. At the beginning of the school year she and her Dad would read 1 chapter per night, now she reads them all by herself. Don't stress out about it, just give her / him the chance and it will take care of itself.

Sylvia - posted on 05/01/2010

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First of all, better than what?

Second of all, why do you need to teach a kindergartener to read? Isn't that what Grade 1 is for?

As far as I'm aware, the best way to turn kids into readers is to read to them, let them see you reading, and let them choose books that interest them (which will be different for every kid). Some kids like to read material that parents tend to think it suboptimal -- Junie B. Jones books (blech), comics, Animorphs ... -- but whatever it is, at this age you should refrain from comment as long as they're showing an interest in reading something. Turning off the TV also helps.

My daughter (who's now in Grade 2) really turned the corner the summer after Grade 1, when we ignored the stupid sheet of "sight words" her teacher sent home (seriously, homework over the summer? what was this woman thinking?) and let her read all the comic books she wanted for all of July and August. (Of course she read other stuff too.) By September, when Grade 2 started, she was reading significantly more easily, more quickly, and more fluently than she had been at the end of June -- not because we worked with her or made her practice or any of that stuff, but because she got to read what she wanted every day instead of what her teacher sent home for her to read. Now we have trouble getting her to put the book away and turn off the light at bedtime :P

Michelle - posted on 05/01/2010

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we used flash card with simple word and sound on them. You can make a set and put 2 of each in and play a matching game. Make them say the word or sound. Start small with 2 - 3 letter words and go from there.

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