Do you reward your child for a good report card?

Candi - posted on 04/11/2011 ( 173 moms have responded )

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I'm trying to figure out if I should reward my child for her good grades on her report card. I was rewarded when I was in school, but I always got a new toy. To me, this seems like a bad idea, as she gets plenty of toys at Christmas and her birthday. My child is in Kindergarten and is top of her class, just like last year in pre-K. I feel that she needs to be rewarded for her hard work and great job. Do any of you reward your child? If so, how? Thanks!

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Meg - posted on 04/19/2011

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My son does well at school. Praise is the best motivator. I let him know that I saw he did well. Hard work that gets noticed will build the self esteem of a child.

Meg - posted on 04/19/2011

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My son does well at school. Praise is the best motivator. I let him know that I saw he did well. Hard work that gets noticed will build the self esteem of a child.

Idella - posted on 04/19/2011

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I dont reward my kids for things I expect from them. I expect them to do the best of their ability in school. I have A students and I have C students. I dont give them a toy or money for earning the grades that I expect. I do reward them for any awards they earn from the school year at the end of the year. They go out to eat at a place of their choice. The only thing getting the grades that I know thay are capable of is they get to keep their pet. In my house everything is earned. If you cant keep your grades up then maybe taking care of a pet is to much. My son has been on the Distinguished Honors list since he got his dog 2 years ago.

Sharon - posted on 04/19/2011

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My daughter is a seven-year-old, second grader. She is in the top of her class and I'm sad to say she's harder on herself than I am. I think positive reinforcement is just as important as discipline. They are rewarded at school with certificates and stickers so why not feel that pride at home. Yes, I expect my daughter to do well in school regardless and more importantly I want her to want to excell. So for now I give her a little money when she has a good report card; it's also helping her to learn and appreciate the value of money.

[deleted account]

Instead of a reward 'toy', try celebrating their success. Let them choose the menu for dinner, take them for a picnic in a park and celebrate to let your child know how proud you are of them.

Patricia - posted on 04/19/2011

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I never gave my children anything for good grades except praise. I helped my children to realize that they needed to do their best for themselves, not me. To me it was more important for my sons to do for themselves. When they did not do well, we talked about how to do better. I made sure that they understood it was their responsibility to do good work. However, their grandmother always gave them money for good grades--not much I could do about that, but I made sure they understood that understood the importance of doing good work for themselves. Giving your children love, security, understanding,respect, and time is all they need.

Tracie - posted on 04/19/2011

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We straight up pay our girls for their grades. They get $5 for an A and $1 for a B. Anything below that they get nothing.

I got paid for my grades when I was younger and it was a terrific incentive. Once my good study habits were in place, I was all set for high school and college. (my parents stopped paying for grades when I started college)

My parents' rationale was that school was my job, so I should get paid for it. The harder I worked, the more I got paid. I had chores, but no allowance, so my grade money was the only money I'd ever get.

I know how much I enjoyed getting paid for my grades and how hard I would work to earn that money. It was very satisfying. So far my girls feel the same way.

Kymberly - posted on 04/19/2011

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No. Not in the sense of there being something extra - a gift or bonus. I do believe they are rewarded in that the status quo - the extracurricular activities and fun - continue.



Using the job analogy to my mind argues against extra bonuses. While some will get raises/bonuses the truth is that good grades are like the day to day achievements of a worker. They are what is expected. Therefore the paycheck - to the worker, or life as he/she knows it to the student - IS the reward, independent of any bonus.

Jennifer - posted on 04/19/2011

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I think rewarding is a great idea. It doesn't always have to be with material things though. Lots of praise, encouragement, (well maybe a sticker here and there, lol) can go a long way. Be specific if/when you praise like, 'I really like the way u colored your sky purple in that picture...' I'm sure you'll figure out just what she needs by watching the reaction :)

[deleted account]

Yes, I agree with Shannin, we looked at it as if you were on a job, the better you do, the better opportunity you have for advancement and bonuses/raises. It has been worth it.

Tammy - posted on 04/19/2011

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Praise for a job well done goes a long way. As a society, we are overly materialistic. Grown ups don't get paid for things they should already be doing anyway, they get paid for providing goods or services when there is a need from external source. Try looking at her good grades as your reward for being a good Mom. A Mom's salary is estimated at $70,000 to $117,000. I have three kids and I'm still looking for that paycheck.

Eleanor - posted on 04/19/2011

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When my son came home with a great report card we celebrated by going out for ice-cream...he gets to buy toys with his money earned from doing chores...he liked it, As someone mentioned, it is expected he do his best at school, so he kept asking WHY we were so proud of him!

Laurentine - posted on 04/19/2011

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yes i reward my kids with a hug and tell them that they could pick what they like to do on Friday since that is our family night and we will do it

Jennifer - posted on 04/19/2011

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Hi! My older two kids are in Second grade and Kindy, they both do fantastic in school. When report cards roll around and they keep up with the good grades we take them out to eat and out to the zoo or somewhere "fun" to reward them. They look forward to it, they already picked out what they want to do when their final report cards come home for the year.

Toni - posted on 04/19/2011

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I have given the older ones $5-$10 & the younger one $5 for good report cards. I have told them if their final report card this year is all A's the older 2 can have mine & their father's laptops. The younger one has decided he wants a new scooter for his final grades. So this is what they are working on now.

Kizzy - posted on 04/19/2011

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There is nothing wrong with rewards. Remember we all like rewards for a job well done. Appropriate rewarding teaches positive cause and effect. Set metrics so that u make sure you aren't sending the wrong message.

Belinda - posted on 04/19/2011

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I use a smilie face / star system. For good behavior and completing chores like putting toys away waiting while I'm on the phone earns a smilie face. 5 smilie faces equals a dollar. You can spend stars on whatever or save them for a particular toy game etc. Bad behavior can loose smiliey faces. Works for me

Gabriela - posted on 04/18/2011

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Sure thing! Kids need to be rewarded for their achievements just like adults do. I agree it doesn't have to be a toy, it can be something else she loves to do or get, or a special treat...

Kim - posted on 04/18/2011

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I do give my son a dollar for perfect spelling tests and if he has a great report card we go out for ice cream. Just a thought.

Jenny - posted on 04/18/2011

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I reward with something special as a treat for hard work. Ice cream, A movie out, an outting, etc....

Jeanne - posted on 04/18/2011

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My 11-yr-old son has (2) significant learning disabilities: Severe Dyslexia and ADHD. However, he has successfully improved his grades across the board this school year and from his last report card (that was MUCH worse!).

I have rewarded his earnest efforts, as I know he's trying his best (his teachers have also confirmed this for me more than once). How about a Jamba Juice or nice ice cream cone or sundae for your child's successful, continuing efforts? My son is VERY response to positive reinforcement/rewards and I think most kids are! Hope this helps!

Angelina - posted on 04/18/2011

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I do. I let them choice something they really want or a movie. My daughter can get her permit this year. So thats going to be her reward if she wants her lisence before 18 its a 3.0 and above required

Kara - posted on 04/18/2011

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My step-son is 12 and we don't reward him, he lies throughout the year about homework, tests, assignments etc, but his Bio-mom plans to reward him with the ability to play football this year if all his marks are over 80%.
My little girl is starting kindergarten this year, so we'll play it by ear. If she does her work and gets the grades, I see no problem rewarding her at the end of the school year. However if she turns out like her older brother - then the rewards will stop. It would be like rewarding her for lying all year round.
I think at the end of the school year, it'd be alright. Maybe an educational game or something would be more appropriate option rather than "just a toy" if you wanted to reward her with a job well done. Or a day out, go to the Zoo, a restaurant of her choice, and giver her a "daughter" day.

[deleted account]

Don't do it. I'm a little sad that her kindergarten is already ranking kids, and hoping you don't let her know they do. Once you start rewarding her, you lose one of the greatest assets a kid has: an innate desire to learn and explore. Discovery is its own reward.

Deanna - posted on 04/18/2011

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I have a 4th grader and PreK, My oldest is not rewarded for good grades. We talk about them and give her lots of praise. When she receives her certificates for honor roll we post them on the inside of our front door for all to see. They have plenty of "stuff" they get the rest of the year. School is their "job" we put a lot of value on their school work, we use a lot of "praise" which in the end is what most children want is to be acknowledged and praised for their hard work. We as humans need it. Talking to our children is more important to me than just giving them something tangible. Words we remember, stuff gets lost. :)

Jennifer - posted on 04/18/2011

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I have rewarded my daughter since she was in Pre-K she is in 1st grade this year. She also has been at the top of her class since she started school. Here they do m for meets standards and E for exceeds standards. The E is equivalent to and A. This report card she got meets in behavior and Exceeds in every subject including specials and is reading at DRA 24 a second grade level. I still gotta take her out for icecream for the great work she did. But, what she values more than the icecream or even money is the praise she gets from me and her father for the great work. I make sure she knows she did a great job and I couldn't ask for a better job!!! With that she lights up like a Christmas tree. I love seeing her that happy!!!

Jennifer - posted on 04/18/2011

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whatever you do, make it consistent and something you are willing to carry on doing especially if there are going to be other children in the family at some point... what you do for one, you need to do for all... encouragement, praise and recognition for their efforts is what they expect at this age and really all they need... you're right, she gets toys for christmas and birthdays, these are special days of the year and are looked forward to, so if you are giving too much of the same thing too often, what is there to look forward to? what you don't want to do is set your child up to be disappointed because you are always expecting them to be top of the class or not far from it - we all want our children to do well, but life is enough of a competition as it is without trying to outdo others with a reward system... but try things like extra special outings or having a friend to stay over, different 'little' options as opposed to 'big' material things that are going to be outgrown or just become clutter around the house because they get 'over it' quicker than they get it.

Bernie - posted on 04/18/2011

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Rewards do not have to be only toys. A special day out, a favourite meal, a note of recognition on the fridge are all indicative of your pride and support of her efforts. Toys are so "available" today (in my day, birthdays and Christmas were the only times toys were got) so doing something that says you love her is what you are aiming at. It also prevents the expectation of "something in return for effort" thinking. We all love to be appreciated at any age *hubbies take note hee hee!

Monique - posted on 04/17/2011

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Yes I do. I feel that a child will continut to do their best if they know they will be rewarded. The bigger the reward the harder they try.

Karen - posted on 04/17/2011

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We don't "pay" her for good grades because good grades are an expectation - she is perfectly capable of performing at that level so to pay her would be a bonus, which is only given (in my work world experience) for work over and above the call of duty so to speak. However, we do feel that her hard work should be rewarded so I take her out for a treat as a celebration of another good report card (I also make sure that she can get whatever she wants (i.e. a frozen hot chocolate with lots of whipped cream and sprinkles even though it might spoil her dinner!) and everyone around is made aware of exactly what we are celebrating so she feels like a mini-celebrity and pumps up her ego a bit for her good effort. I also think this removes some of the focus on the letter grade and puts the reward on the effort itself. For instance, Math is her weak subject but she works really hard at it, while reading and spelling come easy. Therefore, for her, a good grade in Math is very different than a good grade in reading, what matters is the effort. I feel that paying for a specific letter grade does not recognize that she has different strengths and could be a disincentive to continue to work hard to master Math because she wouldn't get a reward anyway. I also recognize that some areas of grading can be subjective and some teachers could have different ideas of what A work is, so by paying for a specific grade rather than rewarding the effort put in to get that grade could be skewed by the inherent subjectivity of the grading process. For instance, in College I had an English Professor who believed that perfect = A, and since noone is perfect noone could get an A. I worked my tail off and, in almost any other class, would have gotten an A but could do no better than a high B+. I would have been pretty peeved if I had lost payment due to his grading philosophy. It was a valuable life lesson in dealing with outcomes out of my control, controlling what I could, and I guess my payment was my folks' continuing coverage of my tuition bill!

Jeannette - posted on 04/17/2011

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out of my 4 children they vary dramatically personality wise and only 2 are keen to go to school everyday as a incentive for all the children to be excited about school and to try their hardest for mid-year reports if they get all above c's they get a day long visit to a amusement park and for the end of year reports they can choose between a season pass to a amusement park or the value deposited into their accounts as a savings, 3 of the kids are all a's and b's 1 of them is dyslexic and his only requirement is to obtain an a for effort in all subjects and he recieves the same incentive. as a further incentive the children are aware that graduating year 12 with good grades and having a chosen field for future study or career employment determined they get a car to help them get around, obviously within reason nothing thats going to break the bank :) i have 1 child whom is completeing high school next year and is focused on computer engineering as his career and study path and the incentives play a ig part in that i also have a 13 yo whom is looking into mining or mechanics when he finishes school (this is my dyslexic child) if it weren't for incentives he wouldn't bother at all as for the 2 youngest they have yet to decide but they are 10 and 6 so they have time and are both excelling at school!

Melissa - posted on 04/17/2011

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Personally, I don't reward my kids for good grades with money. Usually it is something like getting to pick out a book from their school book order forms, or I'll take them to a movie or play a game with them. I think they mostly want the recognition and praise though. I always remind them that doing their best at school and being conscientious is a benefit to them, and the reward will come when they develop skills that make them successful in life.

Candice - posted on 04/17/2011

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My kids (ages 10, 9 and 7) have been in the honor roll every semester since kindergarten and I always remind them getting good grades is a reward in itself! Afterall they are the ones who will reap the benefits a good education can provide. But I do reward them with treats like an ice cream cake or something small for their hard work. After all in this day and age when kids are more worried about "being cool" than being educated it can be hard for some to live above the influence. So yes they should definitely be rewarded for all their hard work!

Candi - posted on 04/17/2011

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My daughter has a savings account, that I add money to myself. She knows she has it, but doesn't really understand why. I opened it, to put money back for college. She has her own piggy bank, that has change in it, that I give her if I get change back I don't want. The she has a canister that is full of dollar bills from what family gives her. She saves a lot of her money. I may give money for good grades and let her spend it only if she wants. If she wants to save, then that's fine too.

Lakisha - posted on 04/17/2011

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yes. reward her withgeting extra mommy and her time. that she get to pick out a special treat for desert, she getten more minues of staying up time, etc.....

Katrina - posted on 04/17/2011

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With my son i always get him a new book. That way even though i'm rewarding him for doing a good job i'm doing it with something educational.

√v^√v^√♥ - posted on 04/16/2011

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Give her a smaller reward but a reward is good to give.

Rose - posted on 04/16/2011

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My daughter is older than your daughter (5th grade) and we just started rewarding her this year. We take $10.00 for every A she gets and put it in her savings account (at this age her toys are VERY expensive), Your daughter might be a little young for this concept (savings account) but you could still do something like a family fun night or something to celebrate. Like dinner and a movie or something to the effect.

[deleted account]

Nope. We do usually go to dinner or have a little party at the end of the year to celebrate another year done (my girls are in 4th right now), but that's it. The good grade IS their reward for a job well done.

I was paid for my grades in high school. When I wanted to do the work it was nice to have some money. When I didn't... no amount of money (or the fact that I had to pay for bad grades) made a difference.

Jenny - posted on 04/16/2011

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I will reward with something small but meaningful for when I see improvement over the prior report or evidence that a strong element of effort has been put in even if it did not reach the Grade A+

Jenn - posted on 04/16/2011

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No, I don't currently reward my child other than with lots of praise. My daughter is also in Kindergarten and I want her to understand the value of a good grade but not monetarily. She is still trying to grasp why a grade even matters so I encourage her to do her very best and show her how over the moon I am when she does just that. Verbal praise is truly what children seek in their early years. I'm sure a reward will be introduced once school gets harder and she needs more incentive than the look of pride on my face :)

[deleted account]

Candi, I agree that it strikes me as the wrong move to reward a good report card. It's a child's job to do their best in school. Just like it's our job to be parents, work, put food on the table.

Words of praise are certainly in order, but no tangible prizes.

Sherri - posted on 04/15/2011

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Exactly and I was never rewarded but told the value of hard work without expecting a monetary reward for doing what I should be doing in the first place. I did a good job because I took pride in my work and I wanted to be proud of the job I did, not because I was getting money to do so. Just doesn't set well for the core values I am trying to instill in my children. So I guess each to there own on this one.

[deleted account]

Hmmmm, I will agree to disagree. I love to reward my daughter for a job well done just as I enjoyed the rewards when I was a kid.

My daughter has struggled with her reading and doesn't have the self-motivation to do well for the sake of doing well. In fact, she has a defeatist attitude and will shut down if things get difficult. I don't bribe her as such, but when the school reports come out I will offer her a treat of some sort if the report is a positive one. That's not say I don't give lots of encouragement during the school term, I always give praise with hugs and kisses when she's doing well.

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