Does anyone have any spelling tips?

Kaylie - posted on 10/24/2012 ( 47 moms have responded )

35

0

7

So I have temporary care of my kid sister. She is eight years old. She doesn't seem to have any learning disabilities, but she also seems very behind her classmates..especially in spelling and reading. It can be blamed mostly on lack o practice.. But now that she is with me, we've been studying for spelling tests and reading. I'm just wondering if anyone has any tips or tricks. We have been practicing our words every night. The test is Thursday, and she only has three of her words memorized. I've made flash cards, word scrambles, asked her to write a story using the words.. I know she can learn them. She just seems very discouraged and isn't putting in the effort. I add words I know she knows to help her fell proud, but she doesn't seem to be proud. I'm very encouraging whether she.is spelling correctly or not.. She isn't fighting with me.. She just isn't trying. Any help?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Kathy - posted on 10/25/2012

1

24

0

Spelling City. Com works great..my twins put words in at beginning of week and then play games all week with the words till the test...start over again the next week.

Bertha - posted on 10/29/2012

3

4

0

Reading Reading and more Reading, together with her read an book, and let her tell you about the story or what she think about the book. Reading is the best way to learn how to spell but you have to start reading with her.

Cindy - posted on 10/28/2012

1

16

0

with my kids I sang each letter as I clapped to a beat as we spelled them. We did it together 3 or 4 times then I had them do it solo over and over until no mistakes. Don't forget to get OVER JOYED when she does it with you as well as on her own. Your sister may be a musical learner. I hope this helps.

[deleted account]

My mother used this method when teaching my sister who has Downs. It worked for my "normal" son last year when they started giving him spellings but I don't have to use it now. Anyway, She would fold up a piece of paper so that she could do one word per square (fold paper into thirds and then in to thirds again or half if you need more room.) She'd start with giving all the letters but one and leaving a line for the missing letter. Then my sister would have to fill in the missing letter. Once she was confident with that, my mother would take away two letters and so on until she could spell the word from scratch. It worked well with my six year old son. It got him to focus. Now I don't need to give him any prompts except for tricky words. Hope this helps! :-)

Christina - posted on 11/04/2012

15

19

4

I know you are trying and she is too. I have fought with this issue with my son since he was in kindergarden. He is very smart but got really discouraged, because he knew he should be doing better than he was. But he got an attitude of nobody needs to know what I know. Long story shorter we found a tutor who tested him and we found out that he has dyslexia. There are different degrees and different forms of this. I looked at Susan Batons website about dyslexia. She gives all the warning signs and so forth to let you know if this is what your dealing with and also gives tips on how to help. It's all free and you find them in the free videos section on this website. Hope this helps. I know it really helped give me some tips to help my boys. We are doing lots better. Hang in there, she knows you are trying and I'm sure she appreciates the efforts.



Link: www.dys-add.com



God Bless,

Christina Allen

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

47 Comments

View replies by

[deleted account]

yes, go to education-tech(dot)org(dot)uk, find the free download, read it and then make flashcards for the words you need to do. Perhaps some of the samples may even be words you can use. Engage her with the images and soon she will want to learn. It worked with our kids a treat. If children understand the word they are much more likely to remember them.

Mari - posted on 12/07/2012

1

0

0

If the child likes to sing investing in a karaoke machines should be considered. You can pick a basic one at target or walmart. Or you can have one that connects to the TV and digital (mp3 +g)

And adults can use it too for parties and holiday family get together.

Sherlee - posted on 12/07/2012

1

0

0

how i helped my 14 yr old son and my 9 yr old daughter i have them spell the word out loud then write the word. fold the paper in half and u spell the word as they write it if they didnt spell it right then you have them write it 3x each then do it over again it helps

Becky - posted on 12/05/2012

8

0

0

Here's some things I use:



Eat your Words! - Have her spell out her words on a placemat or sheet of paper using skittles, smarties, cheerios, licorice, tiny marshmallows, or any other small food or candy she might like. Once she's spelled the word correctly she gets to eat them!



Make a spelling scavenger hunt! - Write each letter for each words on a recipe card or post-it note and put them up all over the house (or just a few rooms) and have her hunt for the letters to form each word. When she gets them all she gets a treasure! (make the treasure whatever you want)



Anyway, there's a couple! Hope this helps!

Bobbi Jean - posted on 11/17/2012

178

0

40

Try having her write the words in shaving cream spread on a jelly roll pan or baking pan with a lip around the outside. Since the shaving cream is soap, her hands and the pan can be rinsed in the sink when practice is done.



Some sources suggest having children write in pudding. However, none of my 2 children 17 nieces and nephews, or over twenty years of students would write in the pudding. Things that worked:



1. sky writing

2. colored chalk on a sidewalk

3. dry erase markers on a small board

4. shaving cream

5. letter tiles--or magnetic letters

6. writing on a small chalkboard

7. fitting three or more words into a goofy written sentence

8. my daughter used to play hopscotch and my son used to play "horse" using the spelling words

Kaylie - posted on 11/11/2012

35

0

7

She seems to be more interested in learning the words regardless of how difficult they get, but I would find it easier if there was some form of pattern. She doesn't say she is bothered about what happened to have her remanded, but I sure that is a cover. I just thought that if she could do better in school without it seeming like work, it.could give her.something to be happy about. Proud of. Ya know?

Kaylie - posted on 11/11/2012

35

0

7

ASorry for my delay. Life got the best of me. I will be trying the new ideas this.week for sure! Last week we enjoyed spelling, she doesn't even know she is learning :)



I'm concerned with the word lists though. Pt interviews are this week so I will be taking why... But her words vary horribly. For Halloween week we had skeleton and ghoul and such, the next week we got off, or, its, don't, Wtf. Then this last week we had remember, remembrance day, veterans.. I'm confused. I know off and or are grade one words. She is in grade 3. Why give an easy week then discourage her with remembrance and such??

Christine - posted on 11/04/2012

3

14

0

With my kids we do spelling city.com and reading eggs.com

They are two great sites that really help my 7 and 10 year olds.

Lukithia - posted on 11/01/2012

30

0

1

I have a child with learning disabilities and I home schooled for many years and worked in early childhood. For your sister when it comes to learning I would suggest you first find out her learning style. Then find ways to incorporate her learning style. Like if she learns tactile/ kinesthetic then maybe spelling Words with Beans, sand, and pasta. If she is auditory then have her make recordings. Ask her what she thinks would help. My son got very behind in math because his 2nd grade teacher spent very little time on it ( we found out when she went on maternity leave the last 3 months of school). He hated math after that and cried if he had to do it. I found computer programs, a rap tape and video, whatever I could and then he got a great teacher 5th grade and began to blossom with tutoring 6th grade he went from scoring a 13% on his assessment to a 87% by the end of the year. I said this to say don't panic she is still young and kids learn at their pace. Make learning fun do not punish her for her lack of interest. Meet with the school and see if they have suggestions or extra help and watch her flourish.

Mrsprincess069 - posted on 10/31/2012

5

0

0

I had custody of my grand-daughter when she was 8 years old, and she had bad grades and was struggling in school. She could not read, and could not spell, and did not understand even simple math. She was on the verge of failing, so every evening we worked on her studies. I had her write her spelling words 10 times each on Monday, 9 times each on Tuesday, 8 times each on Wednesday, 7 times each on Thursday, and she scored 100 every Friday. I also had her read every evening out loud for 30-60 minutes, depending on how much time I had with work. I also had her do math problems, because she had problems with her times tables for 30 minutes every evening. It was about 2 hours of work every evening, but after that she has been in the gifted program every since, and had never needed help. She continues to make straight A's every since, so the hard work for both of us, has really paid off. I also did this same thing with my own son, and he did not have any problems with school, I just wanted to help him stay ahead, and he is in College this year as a freshman, and is an A student, so it does help them. So I hope this gives you some ideas on how to help her, and good luck, kids are really smart, but sometimes just need that extra help!!! God bless you both!!!

Jill - posted on 10/31/2012

92

25

1

Everyone's advice is fabulous! I do a lot of these with my daughter and she's a good speller. Sounds like you're doing everything you can, especially being encouraging. Kudos to you! You're a great sister! It sounds like your sister might be more of a textile kinda kid. Try some of these ideas: place a small amount of sandbox sand in a shallow container and have her use her finger to write the words in the sand. Fingerpainting is a fun one too. Put shaving cream in a large ziploc bag with a few drops of food coloring. Squeeze all the air out and she can write the words with her finger on top of the bag. Write words on a steamy mirror. Also, show her how to break the word down by syllables and show her how to check her own work by sounding out the word she just wrote. Don't correct her while she's spelling a word. Let her finish the word and when she can't sound out the word she just wrote, then she'll start to figure out how she's making her own mistakes. Also, get one of her friends to study with her. Peers are fabulous for teaching each other. Also try www.spellingcity.com just be sure the words are typed correctly before she begins the games. Be sure to keep communication with her teacher. He/she might have good ideas too. Good luck!

Sarah - posted on 10/30/2012

9

15

1

I have two boys in school and they were having a hard time with spelling until we started making them right them every day BUT we had them right it five time on Monday, four times on Tuesday, three on Wednesday, and so on.

They make 100 almost every time. When they don't they only miss one word. Works great!

Sandra - posted on 10/29/2012

28

39

0

Kaylie,

Here is what I do. Every Friday my kids have their spelling tests. I make them start studying on Monday, but I make the studying fun so that they don't mind practicing on a daily basis for the test. We do something called, The Missing Letter Game. First I ask questions from the spelling list once just as an initial drill. Then, I take a piece of paper, write down each spelling word but have a space with missing letters in the spelling word. For example, pear, I write the word as p_ar or something as s_meth_ng. The child has to fill in the blanks with the right letter. I let them look at their spelling list if they need to so they can write the word correctly. It boosts their self-confidence and makes them feel good. Then at the end of the paper, I have them fill in a quote that you know they think would be funny such as K_lie _s s_perlic_ous! Kylie is superlicious. That is just an example. I hope that helps with spelling!

Alison - posted on 10/29/2012

9

15

0

Be sure and read to her every day. This will not help w/ any test coming up this week but it will help in the next year or two!!!

You can throw a ball back and forth saying a letter of a word each time you throw it, she can paint them. she can dance while she sings them, get magnetic letters for the frig, etc.

Or

For spelling, she lists several activities on the weekly homework outline*, and they pick 4.

1. write the words & highlight the vowels

2. write the words 3 times

3. write a sentence with each word

4. spell the words out loud to someone

5. type the words

6. write the words in alphabetical order

7. write the words in different colors using a pattern

Also most important let her know you love her even when she fails a spelling test. :)

Alison

Scottilee - posted on 10/29/2012

9

3

1

Try phonics. I find that most school go with sight words and memorization. If a child learners the different sounds of vowels together properly she will have a greater chance in sounding out her words properly. Soon she will be able to take any word you give her and spell it, with no mistakes. Will take patience though on both sides. She will feel proud as this starts to happen.

Michelle - posted on 10/29/2012

4

3

0

Spelling City.com is a fantastic site!!! Playing games is a fun way to learn them on that site. There is another site that my daughters 2nd grade teacher used to use a couple years ago called Wordle.com. She would type in her words and create pictures with them. Otherwise, it's a repetitive thing. Have her write them 3 times each - even typing them on the computer 3 times each works, call them out to her and have her spell them while you make dinner, my girls' favorite was my putting shaving cream on my kitchen counter..they would make a thin layer and then as I called out spelling words, they would write them in the shaving cream. They loved the fact that it seemed like they were playing while they were spelling. ~Not to mention it is a great cleaner for your counters! If that's too messy, get a picture frame from the $1 store, put some bright colored paper behind the glass and give her a dry erase marker (4/$1 at the $1 store) and as you call them out she can write them. This way they can be taken in the car, out to dinner, etc.

Beth - posted on 10/29/2012

36

20

0

There are also web site dedicated to help, like Spelling City, and they make it fun. My daughter is 10, and I also go through the words with her, looking for patterns (like prefixes, suffixes, and root words). I share with her any tricks I remember that used to help me with tricky words, such as "There is a "rat" in "separate". Or go old school and have her write a sentence with each word. I tell my daughter to look at the word and try to take a picture of it with her mind; later when she tries to spell it, tell her to picture it in her mind. Once she writes it down (in a mock spelling test with you), ask her if it looks right -- like she pictured it on paper before. After trying this for a while, if she doesn't respond or doesn't want your help, give her some ideas to test herself. She can record herself with a phone, iPod, etc, saying each word, then pause it to write it down. At the end, she can check her own work against her list. Lastly, we practice on the way to school. My daughter makes a list each to keep in the car; whoever is driving calls them out on the way to school while she spells. This method is great anytime you're in the car going anywhere. Good luck!!!!

Roslyn - posted on 10/29/2012

1

22

0

Hi Kaylie,

I have a daughter aged 7 and we use a method called "Reading to Learn" which was introduced when she started Kindergarten..( you can find more information about Reading to Learn online). Within this program we used a technique call "Look Cover Write Check" where the child would then look at the word, say the word, cover the word, then write the word and finally uncover the word and check the spelling... The children would use a white board (you can use a piece of white paper in a plastic sleeve) and eraseable markers to do this exercise.

Start by breaking up the word and stretching it to hear all the sounds that make the word. Have her write it, check it, rub it out and write it again. Once she has the hang of spelling that way, ask her to write it 3 times fast instead of once and tick her neatest word...Reward her with lots of praise and high fives. I hope this helps in some way... my daughter took to this technique very quickly and is now spelling and reading at a level 3.5 years above her age.

Sarah - posted on 10/29/2012

8

0

0

Ann, Kaylie did post that her kid sister seems very behind her classmates, including in reading. She "isn't putting in the effort", and "she just isn't trying" when it comes to spelling test preparation.



Given that, I would suggest backing off the spelling test preparation all together, unless the child asks for help. I would assume that there is a background here as to why the poster has her kid sister, and I would also assume that there may be some stress for the child involved. More stress is probably not a good idea.



Snuggle together while reading books that she would enjoy, and don't stress about the spelling - it will come.



Do chat with her teacher, too, though, to check about any problems.

Olga - posted on 10/29/2012

10

3

1

Reading a lot is supposed to help with spelling. The more your brain sees words, the better it remembers how they "look".

But also, I find that my daughter's school approach is good, every week they concentrate on a different "sound" and find words with it, and then have to do spelling exercises at home (a table of words with 3 columns to spell them - you read them out loud, one by one, sound them out, then cover and write them and check, and again 2 more times). For example, one week they will do "oo" words (good, food), "ea" words (read, leader), "tion" words (action, junction), etc...so they can see a pattern. Just keep practicing. If she has any particular problematic words, write them out on cards and stick them to the wall for a week so she can see them each time she walks past, and test her at the end of each week, and maybe have a little prize if she gets - say more than three quarters right? Maybe get her to help you write stuff out, like shopping lists, recipes, anything really. Get her write each word with a different colour. Make it fun, not hard work though!

Good luck!

Ann - posted on 10/29/2012

2

9

0

So many of you are talking about reading but just because she struggles with spelling that does not mean there is a reading issue. My 10 yr old is an excellent reader and enjoys it greatly, spelling not so much.



What we have learned is that she is a full body learner. Try singing the words.

Other things to do are jumprope or hollahoop. Get a ball and toss it back and forth takeing turns with her saying one letter at a time.

Get a tupperwear and fill it with sand , have her write the words in the sand with her finger.

Play guess the word, you spell the word to her by traceing it with your finger on her back.



Best wishes

Kristy - posted on 10/29/2012

15

4

2

Spelling city was going to be my suggestion too. It seems my kids will do anything if technology is involved. It also sounds like she needs work with spelling rules. My kids have a list of words that all have the same rule so they can apply it to words that aren't on their list. Talk to her teacher and see if she/he has any suggestions. Your sister has probably gotten frustrated with not doing well and has given up. Hang in there!

Terry - posted on 10/28/2012

5

20

0

We write the weekly spelling words on bold black letters on a 3x5 card every monday...then, every day after school my son looks at each card and spells the word out loud. Then we take a practice test. If he struggles with a word I tell him to take a moment and think what the work looked like on the card. When we check the test together, he has to write each misspelled word 5 times...spelling them out loud as he does. This method made a HUGE difference in his spelling.

Sarah - posted on 10/28/2012

8

0

0

Really, at this age, the emphasis should be on making reading fun. Not a chore, not something to be avoided, not "homework" - but reading for pleasure, reading for fun will pay off in everything. Get her comic books, get her anything she likes for reading, read her the first couple of chapters of something fascinating, and then put her to bed and leave the book and a flashlight in the room. The emphasis shouldn't be on her getting high marks in spelling, it should be on sucking her into the wonderful world of reading.

Barbara - posted on 10/28/2012

15

5

0

Wonder if she has a problem with dyslexia... this may be a concern... Try teaching her the Manual alphabet (sign language and spell each word on you hands... easy to learn and can be fun to spell using your hands... Google American Sign Language and you can find as easy video to teach yourself the letters. Worked for my kids.

Kate - posted on 10/28/2012

9

8

0

Have you had her vision tested? Even if she seems to have 20/20 vision she may still have vision problems. My daughter wasn't interested in learning to read. But after eye thearphy she wants to read everything.



Here is a link to a optometrist were I live, but I think there is a link to look for optometrist in other areas.



http://www.optometrists.org/visionnow/vi...

Pamela - posted on 10/27/2012

711

9

6

It could be any number of things, including planetary transitions in her chart that may be causing difficulties or discouragement.



Try making a game of it instead of a drill. Write the words on paper and then cut each letter out separately. Put the letters in front of her, tell her which word it is and give her so many seconds to rearrange the letters to spell the word. (say 30 to 60 seconds) Then when she gets a word right ask her to do it in 15 seconds or ten seconds. Have fun with it and give her something special at the end....a favorite treat!



You could also make a chart so she can see her own progress. This week you got two words correct...etc!



The highest and best to you both. Also reading to her each night before she goes to sleep is a great way to encourage reading. I have no idea why parents don't read to young children every night before they go to bed. I did with my sons and they always loved it!

Cynthia - posted on 10/26/2012

8

20

0

just keep supporting her. She needs to build up self estem and needs to be encouraged. I had my daughter write each word she missed 3 times each. Then each time she missed it again, add another so it would be 4 times, and so on. I did it to teach not punnish. when you write somthing down it is almost like writing it on your brain. on the reading, have her read out loud to ensure she is reading correctly. I would stop my daughter if she did not read exactly what was there and make her start the paragraph over. I told her, "read what is there and only what is there." She got so tired of hearing me say that, but later she was thankful for me being tough on her and makes straight A's. She is very good in English and reading now.

SiewYean - posted on 10/26/2012

50

11

0

Wow, there are so many tips here which I find it useful for me too.



I have another tip to share...

My son was 9 last year and he was a bit lacking in spelling according to his teacher. (I switched him from a Chinese school to an International school with British syllabus) I was told by my son's teacher to get him to spell according to the sound. For example, the word Comprehension...read it as com, get him to spell com, follow by pre, he spells pre, read hen and he spells hen then read sion and spell sion. Finally, get him to spell the full word as we read it out.



I saw improvement now as he is approaching 10 this year.

Jennifer - posted on 10/26/2012

9

0

0

There's something called Spelling city that my kids use. At the school my kids go to the teacher's go online to spelling city and enter their weekly words and they have games that the kids can play to help them learn their words. It's something you might want to ask the teacher if they do the same. You can go on a regular computer to play or if you have an IPad or IPhone you can download the app for free. There's also other spelling apps you can download that lets you input her weekly spelling words yourself so that she can have fun playing games and learning at the same time. My daughter loves them. I also make my daughter write her words twice each day and quiz her on it twice during the week to make sure she is learning them.

Kaylie - posted on 10/26/2012

35

0

7

Her teacher says they will be practicing one day a week, and the word list is in the agenda instead of the board. We didn't get the test back today, so I will find out by Monday. Until them we will try the many games and advice we have heard and any that keep coming.

Jennifer - posted on 10/26/2012

100

3

5

My son almost always gets 100% right on his spelling tests, but if you were to hear him spell his words at home you wouldn't believe it. A lot of kids just can't concentrate at home as well as they can in school and for some reason they just do better when it's the teacher teaching them and not the parents. Do you know if your sisters teacher practices them with the students throughout the week? My son's teachers has the words up on the board through out the week and goes over them with the kids, since I grade the tests and any other work that the kids do I see how well they do and just how well that helps them. It takes a lot of patience and a lot of encouraging. His teacher also says the word 2 to 3 times and then puts it in a sentence at test time, so maybe try that. I think I am going to try that with my son, because I can tell it really helps him. There are kids in my sons class that are super smart and higher than their grade level and then in other things they're below grade level. Kids just develop at different ages. There are some good websites out there as well that my son's school uses.



www.coolmath.com yes I know, it's math, but it's an awesome website

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/typing/

pbskids.org/games/reading.html



Also, for the reading, have her read anything and everything with you. When you're in the car on a road trip you could play the game where you find a word that starts with each letter of the alphabet, for example: you see a road sign that says attention wet road, you or your sister(which ever one sees it first) can say attention. Each person has to find a word anywhere, whether it be on a store, billboard, sign, car, semi, or any place else. But, you guys can't pick the same word and you can't get a word from the same sign. Basically, it's a race to see who can get to z the fastest, by going in order. It's a really fun game, I played it with my brother, sister, and my son back in 2010 when he was only 6, we had a blast. Hope this helps!

Kaylie - posted on 10/26/2012

35

0

7

Wow great tips guys! We did some singing last night and she wrote the words she didn't really know five times each! I'm hoping the test comes back today :) perhaps that's wishful thinking, but hey I'm.feeling way more confident than Wednesday.. And she is too! I will try spellcity.com for next weeks words and a combination of writing them and singing also! We ordered some books from those silly scholastic rip off things so she should like reading those with me. The books I had were too young for her apparently. :)



Are there any games you know for us to practice random words for the weekend? She likes hangman which is fun for us. Is there anything else though? Its been so long since I learned, I have to refresh my mind and try to remember what my parents taught me. Brings me back to the fun days!

Kay - posted on 10/25/2012

4

0

0

Thank you Kathy for listing the spellcity.com website, just signed up and it's seems to be just what my daughter needs.

Kristina - posted on 10/25/2012

30

15

2

I have used what I call rainbow writing, I write the word once and then my child traces the word with different colors, sometimes I would have them say each letter as they would write it and then say the word at the end. The best way to help with her reading is read with her every night, you read a sentence then she reads one. Good luck

Laura - posted on 10/25/2012

8

2

0

My 8-year-old son isn't keen on spelling either. He gets a packet every week, and instructions to write each spelling word three times - with spaces for the words. Then he gets to use the words in a whacky sentence. One week the words included double "o" words like "goofy," "poodle," "noodle," "bamboo," along with "howl" and "uncle". He wrote: "My goofy uncle eats bamboo noodles then howls with the poodles." This was a big laugh for him. So I guess the suggestion is to use a combination of repetition and fun.



I also give him a pre-test before the actual spelling test at school, so we have a chance to see how he's doing with the words and reinforce the ones that aren't firmly memorized yet.

Kaylie - posted on 10/25/2012

35

0

7

What a good idea! She loves singing, she thinks she is a dance professional, so this should go amazing! She has five words memorized after last night, hopefully we can sing the rest! Thank you!

Shawnn - posted on 10/24/2012

6,973

21

1898

Well, with my son, what worked was "singing" the spelling. I'd put the words to a rhythm, and we'd clap and dance while spelling.



Worked great when the kids were about that age. Does she like to dance and play like that? If so, try it!

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms