Help! My son is going to flunk Kindergarten!

Devinn - posted on 01/19/2010 ( 104 moms have responded )

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I don't know what to do for him. We have tried to teach him his alphabet and numbers since he was very young and he still doesn't understand. We have gotten him tons of games to help him, but he won't play them right so he can learn and he is so bull headed it's frustrating. The homework just keeps getting harder and he doesn't understand what he's being asked to do. There's no way we could ever afford a tutor. If he doesn't catch up by the end of the year, should we hold him back?

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Vickie - posted on 10/26/2012

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I struggled with this decision with one of my children and in the end I backed off, took him out of kindergarten because they couldn't help him and I waited and put him straight into first grade because the school didn't offer any help or tutoring until first grade. By the middle of first grade he was reading on grade level. It just hadn't clicked for him yet in kindergarten, he wasn't ready.



If you expose kids to reading, numbers, etc. and don't force it they will learn when they are ready. If you push them to the point of frustration they will shut down and come to hate learning and feel bad about themselves. Read to him every night, point out numbers on mailboxes, in books, at the grocery store, video games, etc., but don't force him to try to do anything, just go about your day. Oh, also the Leapfrog dvd's are excellent, just don't let your child know they're educational, lol.

Kim - posted on 01/24/2010

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My daughter was born in Sept so she went into Kindergarten at almost 6 yet letters were not her thing. My son was reading at 4 and she didn't even know her letters after age 6. They both had the same K teachers so she knows its not because we haven't bothered with her. Luckily we did find a website that she loved and all of a sudden it clicked for her. It had music which she loves. She is 1/2 way thru 1st grade and is in a special reading class but she is getting it slowly but surely. They say by 7 most kids will start to be able to read, and by 3rd grade most catch up. I will try to find the link to the website for you. but just work with your son bits at a time. He is frustrated because it is a lot of work for him and in Kindergarten he really should not have a lot of homework unless it is reinforcing letters and numbers. If you are working on that with him it should be enough, and dont' force other work on him, he is little and should have some free play time not always structured time. and if it seems it will be better for him, I would keep him back, but leave your options open for now, things could just click for him. Here's the website-- http://www.starfall.com/n/level-k/index/...

Rebecca - posted on 04/22/2012

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Kindergarten is that solid foundation upon which EVERYTHING builds.



My son turned 6 in November, and there is a big chance that we will be holding him back. My "gut" or "mommy instinct" had been telling me for several years that something just wasn't right, so after discussing a possible retention with my son's teacher, my husband and I called the pediatrician. After doing Vanderbilt and meeting with pedi, our son was diagnosed with ADHD, anxiety, and oppositional deffiance and was referred to a pediatric psychiatrist. We got in this last week and started medication. My son's teacher has already seen a difference, but we are so late in the year that I don't think it will get him to 1st grade. The pedi psych also saw possible signs of a learning disability. My son's teacher says there is a big chance if we don't retain in K, we will end up retaining in 1st or he will always be at the bottom of the class. OR, we retain and build that foundation SOLID and he is top of his class. I would prefer retention now and a solid foundation rather than struggling for the rest of his life....



SO, yes, retain. Get testing done for learning disabilities/autism/ADD, etc. Ask if district offers free or reduced tutoring. Or see if there is a junior high or high school student willing to tutor for a small fee or even free for community service hours.

Dana - posted on 02/26/2013

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Here's a different perspective to consider....My birthday is the end of November. My parents put me in private school for kindergarden and first grade so that I might begin school despite the age cutoff that public schools impose. I did really well all through school with no problems. However, when I graduated all of my friends were ready to move on to college and had a good understanding of what their goals were. I on the other hand was very lost, confused , and embarrasssed that I wasn't ready to move on to college. I was too immature. I needed that extra year to mature emotionally even though intellectually I could "keep up". There are other reasons to hold a child back other than his educational development. Good luck to you and your child.

Allison - posted on 10/23/2012

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I hope your son had continued on to the first grade. There is no reason children fall behind when the teachers are to intervene and provide adequate curriculum to help the children learn in ways they learn best.



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Threenorns - posted on 10/27/2012

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i was going to answer bec this came through in the email digest - but it's 2 years old! seriously!??

Allison - posted on 10/26/2012

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Because pre-kindergarten and kindergarten class focus on the creative, enjoyable aspect of learning and practicing needed basic, foundational skills in child-centered ways that appeal to learning through the five senses, it is no wonder children are better students when they get older--because they like to learn and take the initiative to explore subject matter.

Valarie - posted on 10/24/2012

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All I can say is this....I have been involved with two families who have decided to hold their sons back in Kindergarten. One is now in 7th grade and is considered a state scholar, and the other, is in 9th grade and taking four advanced classes. Both families cried over the decision, and now feel like it was the best decision ever!

Michelle - posted on 10/16/2012

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So much easier to hold back in kindergarten than at an older age. But agree with Deborah, ask for evaluation from the schools for learning disabilities. Don't know where you reside but here a parent can ask the school for an evaluation if there's a reason for concern and the seeming inability to learn would be one.

Donna - posted on 10/11/2012

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You could try an insentive chart, my son almost failed and I had to teach him everything he needed to know in two short months. At first make it easy to get the reward start with the basics, this will prevent him from getting frustrated. After he gets the hang of it, offer him a little bigger insentive but not as often, keep doing this until he is working toward a really big insentive. He will be excited to see the star, sticker, dot or mark on the chart and will want to get more so he can get the special incentives. It does work just be patient. Speak with his teacher if there seems to be a comprehension problem or some kind of educational impact, make an appointment with his doctor. His doctor should be able to point you in the right direction. Be sure to take all his school documents with you, and any conference forms, notes from the teacher and behavior logs the school may have. it will help give a better picture of what is going on also take him to an eye doctor there could be underlying conditions that prevent him from learning. I wish you the best of luck

Maria - posted on 10/09/2012

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My son is having trouble in kinder he does not want to do the class work or participate or talk. Last year he went to pre kinder 4 and he did fine. This year this teacher dose not know what to do we talk to her and let her know that at home he does the homework but the last two weeks he does not want to do anything just cry we talk to he but we dont know what else to do.

Sam - posted on 07/30/2012

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I think you should play with him and teach him at the same time. You shouldn't tell him that he is going to learn counting...just make it fun, like collect rocks and count how many each of you has....

Helen - posted on 07/26/2012

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Hi all
Tutoring is definitely a good idea for a young child. My mother was very big on early learning, and she started teaching me to write when I was around 2 years old. By 3, I was reading and writing, and by 4 I could start on chapter books, in Chinese. Although now I prefer English, Reading in any language became a lifelong hobby ever since. So if you want your child to truly enjoy learning, you ought to start teaching him or her fast. It's never too early.
I live in NYC, and go to one of the best high school in the city, Stuyvesant High School. My classmates and I tutor kids from as young as 3-18, in all subjects. The material is still fresh in our minds and we know, from firsthand experience, what teachers would expect at every age. Many of us have already been accepted into MIT and other Ivy Leagues.
So, although school starts at around 5 or 6, the ATTITUDE towards education MUST be cultivated earlier to be the most successful.
If you are interested, please contact us at our site,
www.checkplustutoring.wix.com/site
Many thanks!

[deleted account]

Get whatever help you can get from the school for starters. My friend's little boy is going through this, but here in the UK the children aren't held back and progress regardless of whether or not they are ready. My friend's boy is six and he is far behind where my six year old is in terms of reading. The school is going to do some testing in the fall so hopefully they can offer some help then.

I spoke to my mother about my friend's son because my mother taught my sister (who has Downs) to read. Her advice was to try to make learning to read as tactile as possible. Use different physical ways of creating the alphabet. Cut pieces of sandpaper into the different letter shapes; use shaving foam to make the letters; make the letters out of playdough; use stones; or anything you can think of. Do one letter/sound at a time and practice every day. Some children learn better by doing than they do by seeing.

Good luck, I hope something clicks for your son and he starts to pick it up soon.

Becky - posted on 04/25/2012

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My son is starting in a similar program in a week. I've heard wonderful things about it and we're going to try it.

Becky - posted on 04/25/2012

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Have you talked to his teacher and school counselor about early childhood education classes that are available to him through school? My son can sing the abc's and count to 20 but he can't pick out a letter or number to save him. I had him tested for learning problems and he qualified for an afternoon program at our school for children who just need a little extra help. They set goals for the children, parents and teachers that work towards the child learning what they need to inorder to advance academically. Starting next month, my son will attend K4 in the morning like normal, then he'll stay for afternoon classes in ECE to get the one on one help he needs. Plus this program is funded by the state so there is no additional cost to the parents for the extra tutoring. Keep in mind too -- most boys are harder to teach and resist learning; they are more interested in playing and exploring.

Deb - posted on 04/24/2012

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Yes, the demands on children have increased from even 10 years ago. 1st grade is a tough year, especially for boys who don't have fine motor skills yet, which are used in writing. Better to hold him back now, than later when he is more aware.

Shannon - posted on 01/31/2010

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Hi, my little boy had the same problem. Our school system has a class for kindergarteners who have a lot of trouble grasping the basics. It's called developmental kindergarten here. Basically it's half pre-k, half kindergarten. The class gets them ready for kindergarten next year. It did a world of wonders for my son. In a few months, he received the Terrific Kid award, which is hard to come by. Thank God for that program.

Margaret - posted on 01/27/2010

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I would most definetly hold him back. My nephew had trouble in kindergarten and now he is in 3rd grade and he is still so far behind. He doesnt read or write on his grade level. His mom didnt want to hold him back cause of being embarrassed but now she regrets it. My 1st graders read and spell better then he does. I know it is a hard decision but better to hold him back now then he struggle the rest of his school life. You might also want to get him tested for any disabilities like dyslexia. I wish you all the best.

Julia - posted on 01/27/2010

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my son was held back, he just didnt get it.. honestly he is doing great and is now a 6th grader.. some kids just dont get it in kinder no matter what you do... as for being bullheaded.. have you had his eyes checked. It was the first thing they suggested at school when my son was having issues in kinder.

Jenni - posted on 01/27/2010

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you don't mention his age, but he is probably in the Early Years Foundation Stage age range, It has been porved by child phsycologists that boys learn in a different way to girls and there are articles regarding this. I would'nt force him to learn as this may discourage him from laerning in later life, I think you should approach your knidergarten so you can work together which is what they should be doing as part of the EYFS ( I should know I'm a childminder who has to follow this cirricuclum for children who I care for in this age range.) as they should be working in oartnership with parents if you have any concerns. You can get a copy of the Statuatory requirments for the EYFS from the Department for children,school and families.(Dcfs) it's quite detailed but will give information regarding the level you child should be at.
Hope this is helpful

Jeni

Deb - posted on 01/26/2010

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You may have tried this, but some kids remember really well to music. My daughter loves to put everything to a melody. It really helps her remember, also rhyming books. I love Chicka, Chicka, Boom, Boom. We do sing it and get very theatrical. If he does need to be held back, I wouldn't sweat it. Better now, than struggle long term.
Good luck.
Deb

Kelli - posted on 01/26/2010

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I am a huge fan of the Leap Frog Videos. I know most people are anti tv for kids but I think content of what they are watching is key. If the show is educational and keeps their attention then it is not bad. Every kid learns at a different pace. If we were still living in the one room school house days your child would have been allowed to move on or stay back in the subjects as they came. Unfortunately with our system now this is not possible. Like others have said don't feel bad, let him be him and learn at the pace that is right for him. This does not mean don't buy things to stimulate him or try to work with him, but just don't compare him so much to other kids. I think the negative connotation attached to kids that don't fit the mold does not help and is wrong. People are different and mature at different rates. Just as all kids do not go through puberty at the same rate they do not develope intellectually at the same rate. I can see this just between my two children. My daughter is what the schools would call "gifted" but because her boredom in class and independent spirit caused her to be defiant, the wanted to diagnose her with something to fix, but even with mass testing that they did they found nothing and in the end recommended we home school her because they could not place her since her emotional age did not match her intellectual age. So your child doesn't fit the clone mold. You know your child best, follow your heart and do what you think is best for him.

Tracy - posted on 01/26/2010

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I have been teaching preschool for about 12 years and my recommendation to you is: yes, hold him back. Each year will just keep getting harder and hareder. He needs more time. It will pay off in the long run to keep him in kindergarten another year. Talk to his teacher and find out what help is available. I'm in Pennsylvania and through the public schools here offer help free. You also might be able to get someone from a college teaching program pretty cheap to tutor your son. Please do not push him along. He will end up frustrated and will likely wind up hating school.

Barbara - posted on 01/26/2010

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My youngest son had a similar problem. First go to his doctor with your concerns and see what he says...he may have to be tested for add, dyslexia or any other learning disability....2nd find out if the school has a transitional 1st grade. Its not getting left back but an extra grade for kids not ready for 1st grade. If you do find that he has a learning disability get an advocate who can help the school better attend to his needs...No sure who you would call but I used the Association for Special children and Families...this does not mean you have a special needs child at all...dont be embarrassed or ashamed to call....Im sure he is just not ready for school yet...it happens all the time..some kids need a little more time...

Laura - posted on 01/26/2010

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I amthe mother of 5 adopted children so needless to say they each came wirth thier own set of problems.My youngest girl had special classes she went to since she was 3, we checked her hearing her speech the whole nine yards. I home schooled her for kindergarden because I could tell she wasn't retaining the information. I though if I spent tiome with her one on one this would help her to learn her letrters, numbers etc. It seemed like everything was going well so I put her in public schoolthe following year. She started out slow and continued to fall back as the year progressed. We tried everything and every program the school had to offer. To no avail she failed first grade. Her second year of first grade she came home with almost all "A" until the end of the year. When they started introducing second grade information she started falling behind again. This year she is in 2nd. grade and she is strrugling. I said all of that to make this point. When I pressure her to learn because I want her to Keep Up she feels bad about herself and does poorly. The first few years of school are crucial to our children.If they hate it now, by the time they get to high school they will want to drop out. Each child has a learning pattern and timing. Music, feeling, seeing, touching these are all different ways our children learn. Just give your son some room to fail if he isn't ready to move forward. Let hom enjoy learning with out the pressure of performing. As a parent it is hard to see your child fail or fall behind but they need to grow and learn at their own pace. This is just the opinion of one mom with a simular probolem. Tell me what you think.

Vivian - posted on 01/26/2010

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Holding him back is entirely up to you. I do feel your pain, the attention span is greater then your patience, I bet. My suggestion is that you will have set aside some time to fully focus on him, take a few minutes (10 to 15min) a day and add 1 to 2 minutes until he adjust or break it up into 2 sessions.

Melissa - posted on 01/26/2010

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I felt the same way with my oldest I still do at times. He is in the younger age group for here in Vegas if a child turns 5 by Sept. 30 they can start school he turned 5 Sept. 14. Its not that he is having a real hard time although he's grades could be better he's just not up to level with most of the other kids at his grade level especially when it comes to reading and writing. On the other my middle son is actually one of the older students in his class he was born Nov. 28th and the difference between what he understands and how he does in school is night compared to his brother.

Devin - posted on 01/26/2010

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My middle daughter had the same problem. But her kindergarten teacher was sure she was ready to excel to 1st grade (she knew hardly any letters, numbers) I knew she was behind because of the level my oldest was at when she left K. Everyone told me children are different, can't compare blah blah. Well tell you what she struggled through 1st in reading (the school provided tutoring) and now 2nd she is struggling again but in math. I wish I would have listened to my gut and held her back in Kindergarten before she knew any better, because at the age she is now she understands and would be humiliated to be held back.

NURIZAN - posted on 01/26/2010

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Dear Devinn,
I hv 2 kids age 4+(F) and 5+(M). We also have problems when they 1st started kindergarten. Now, after 1 year of kindergarten & preschool, my son (the laziest & play 99% of his time) can read & write in Bahasa (our mother tongue in Malaysia) and English. He now reads the magazines & newspaper! My daughter loves singing & dancing thus our approach is completely different with her. She hates reading but tells good stories (her own translations from the pictures).
***Here are some tips:***
1) Speak to the teacher and seek advice, they are the best observers.
2) Do Not push them too much. Make learning FUN & Enjoyable.
3) Identify his strength & weakness. Stress more on the Strength and make him more confident of himself then gradually improvise on his weakness.
4) Start with short (5mins) coaching then increase the time. Maximum is 20-30mins, then they lost interest. Remember 1min of attention is better then none!
5) Reward & Praise him when he does the right things or learn something new.
6) Always approach kids with a smile & that boost their confidence in you (they must know that you r not angry, believe me they can feel and sense quickly).
7) Pray together.
Good luck & don't worry too much.

[deleted account]

How old is your son?? I have a nephew who stayed back in kindergarten and did better the next year. Sometimes they just seem to be immature for their age and they need an extra year to learn how to learn. My son also had a hard time in kindergarten, they wanted us to keep him back, we chose to send him into grade 1 with the thought that if he was having a really hard time we would keep him back in grade 1. He did fine and is now in gr. 3... Every child is different but listen to your gut...

Stephanie - posted on 01/25/2010

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Have you ever thought that maybe your soon needs tto be tested for a learning disability.The reason I ask is because my daughter did flunk kindergardn last year.By the skin of her teeth they let her go into the 1st grade a week before school because she passed a test.But the reason why Olivia was having a hard time in school is because she couldnt focus.Well we now know that she is ADHD and dixlexic.I had the school put her with someone that evealuated her and got her the help she needed.Be patient with your son. and dont get dicouraged.

Samantha - posted on 01/25/2010

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how old is he ? my son is 5, he turned 5 last september and started kindergarten last august which he was younger than all his classmates and quite immature altho he has no issue learning and is one of the top smartest kids in his class he just is unable to focus for too long, stay in his seat longer than fifteen minutes, and does not LISTEN and interrupts the teacher non stop, luckily his teacher is good with him and does not think he should be pulled out, his last teacher did. we struggled with taking him out and starting over next year but my gut told me not too, i do know that he has alot of kids in his class that are struggling like your son, as far as i know its common and everybody learns at their own pace, my son is actually reading already, knows the alphabet by heart, knows numbers 1-30 and can write short words which i thought was really extrodinary , apparently thats the norm for kindergartners, his teacher is already teaching them math problems and science, things i even think are too difficult for their age, who knows but hang in there, quick question has he ever watched sesame street, dora or any of those educational childrens programs, i dont know if that really matters but my son did since he was like a year and half almost everyday.

good luck i am sure your son will catch up , if not he will soon, every kid is unique and learns at their own pace !

Megan - posted on 01/25/2010

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Yes!! Even if there is a chance he could catch up you might want to consider keeping him back so that he can learn to focus and learn better study skills. Him knowing some of the answers next year will get him motivated and make him feel good about himself. My son did ok with kindergarten the first year but couldn't focus and that prevented him from finishing work and learning properly. He is now in his second year of kindergarten and though I really hated that he had to do it again I am now so happy that I let him stay back. He is so excited when he "gets" something and comes home and says he finished all his work. He is learning so much that he didn't learn last year and I think he would have drowned under the more strict schedule of 1st grade. Talk to your son's teacher but if the suggestion is he should stay back then let him. It won't hurt him as far as friends go because he will make so many more and it's better he stay back now at a young age then in 4th or 5th when kids are so much more aware. They all grow up to fast anyways and even if he's the smartest kid ever it might be a good idea to give him the extra encouragement of "hey, I think I know this.". Good luck!!

Nicole - posted on 01/25/2010

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I would def let him repeat. My young child is also in K and Im cosidering holding her back on my own just because of her age and maturity. it surely wont do anything but help him.

Anne, Or Annie - posted on 01/25/2010

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My daughters have also had problems with riding bikes, and swimming and things like that as part of the aspergers syndrome, it's nice to know that other kids have been experiencing something similar. I have found that with time these things pass and they learn eventually. It also doesn't mean that there is anything wrong. Don't get down on yourselves as mothers, just keep trying new things. We're currently having my 2 girls with this problem in swimming lessons, with small classes, and they walk on the treadmill at home, and in the summer jumping onthe trampoline has helped them less afraid of falling. That was one of the reasons that my girls were afriad to ride bikes, was they had a hard time being afraid to fall, balance was an issue, but the trampoline gets them a little more comfortable with their bodies and falling is kind of fun then... so sometimes they gain a little confidence with positive experience like that.

Renee - posted on 01/25/2010

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Holding him him back a year may very well be the best thing for him, though it is difficult for you as his parent. My daughter, being born in mid-June, is one of the youngest kids in her class. She didn't start struggling with things until she hit third grade. Last year, we noticed it was getting worse. She couldn't focus for anything and she had a hard time understanding what she was supposed to do. I ended up having her evaluated and found out that she has Asperger's Syndrom with ADD. Asperger's is a form of Autism. Obviously, she's a very mild case. Many people wouldn't even know it, but I have known her whole life there was something different. She is still very smart, but she is overly emotional and there are some physical things she just isn't good at. Things like riding a bike and a scooter. She can't do these things. Anyway, I'm not saying your child has this. He may not be ready for Kindergarten yet. But, I would continue to watch him. If letters are what he has the biggest problem with, and it doesn't get better over time, I would consider having him checked for dislexia. I have a family member who struggled all through school and no one knew what was wrong until he was in high school. Finally, the problem was found and they taught him a new way to read and write so that he could understand. Your son may not be ready, and that's fine. But, there may be an underlying issue such as dislexia, which doesn't mean there's anything really wrong with him. If he does have it, he can still live a normal, happy, healthy life. That is the most important thing. Just continue to work with him a few minutes a day, and monitor his progress. You'll know what to do when the time comes. Best of luck to you and your son.

Anne, Or Annie - posted on 01/25/2010

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I have faced this same thing with 2 of my daughters. I won't deny that it has been a challenge and I can tell you from experience if they are going to be held back it's much better to do kindergarten twice than to wait until they are older and the other kids remember them and tease them because they can figure it out. At 5 or 6 most kids won't really remember that their friend was held back. It's still a possibility, but, if you find that in 1st grade the problem is only getting worse and you have to hold him back then, it's going to be much harder on him. However, he may bounce back. A lot of the reason kids don't do so well is because they aren't interested enough in how things are being taught. If it's more catered to how he learns he'll probably do a lot better. Perhaps you could volunteer in the classroom and see if he appears bored, or see if his attention is drawn away by other things going on in the class, those can be good clues as to why he's behaving the way he is.

Maria - posted on 01/25/2010

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I had my child tested before entering K-4 and my sister who has a master's in learning disabilities said that he was not ready to enter K-4. I held him back. It was the best thing for him. He was not interested and engaged at 4. Now he is in K-5 and loves it. He is at a private school and a few of the other boys are 6 in K-5 also. I think that they must mature a little slower.

Jessica - posted on 01/25/2010

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Well this isnt exactlly a bad thing!! My twins stayed back 2 yrs of kindergarten due to developmental delays. They are now in the 2nd grade catching up with no problems. Sometimes its better they stay back now rather than fail in their later years when they are more at risk of being made fun of by bullies for being stupid, retarded, or any other hurtful sayings they may have. It gets very frustrating because your child may seem or be so very smart to you but may need that tad extra bit of help that you may not notice or are just blinded because your other children were never like that. good luck to you!!

Kathy - posted on 01/24/2010

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If he is younger, then I dont think it is a big deal to hold him back it would be harder on him if he just barely passes then he will just struggle the next year.
My son had the same problem and one of my friends bought him the leap frog DVD video called the word factory. I know that maybe purchasing another tool from are very abundant sales gimmicks that feed off parents worry about their childrens education doesnt sound very promising, but hang in there and I promise you will see the results .
My son finally learned his Alphabet in 2 weeks after watching this video and I was amazed becouse like you I had bought so many other learning tools that expected too much inner action from him in the begining stages of learning. I hope this helps
empathitic ,kathy

Kelly - posted on 01/24/2010

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I am a Kindergarten teacher, and we see this kind of thing every year. Some kids tend to make leaps later in the year, once they are comfortable with school and the routines. If he is still behind at the end of the year it is best to hold him back now, rather than waiting until he is old enough to really know what is going on. Don't feel bad or that it's beacuse of anything you are doing as a parent. Try not to make learning stressful for him OR YOURSELF! My kids love LeapFrog videos and bathtub toys. You can always find great deals on eBay or Craigslist. Is there a family history of any learning disabilities? You can also consider having educational assesments done if you and/or his teacher think there may be some kind of learning disability. Hang in there, and try not to get too discouraged. He will feed off your anxiety! He will get where he needs to be when he is ready!!

Tabitha - posted on 01/24/2010

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He may be not ready for Kidergarten.
I am a homeschool mom of 2 and I have one that is a book worm and one that is not.
Not all children are the same.
You spending as much time with him is what will counts in the long run.

Sunitha - posted on 01/24/2010

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make flash cards on the things he needs to learn. make it a game that way it is more interesting. you can also by scholastic book for kindergarten and work through the whole book . it is fun. i did it with my son and i still do it now. I was told when he was 3 years old that he may not be ready and needs to be held back and i worked with him. Also make an appointment first with his teacher before doing anything and find out where he is struggling. So you know where to start then after that work on everything. My son is in second grade did not get held back and i still do scholastic books and he is little above his grade level. in reading, and math.

Toni - posted on 01/24/2010

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I would hold him back. Repeating kindergarten is better than when he gets older. It may be simply a maturity issue. My daughter did a year and a half of kindergarten. Now in second grade she does fantastic an I am glad for the choice I made.

Leslie - posted on 01/24/2010

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Yes as there is no harm in repeating Kindergarten and can be so beneficial in many ways. Have you checked if he has dyslexia?

Tracy - posted on 01/24/2010

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Definitely hold him back. My son struggled through pre-k, kinder, first and second grades. (he was the youngest in his class) And we kept asking the teachers whether or not we should hold him back. He was miserable up to and through 2nd grade. He's a very smart boy, just matured at a different rate. We held him back finally in the 2nd grade. Luckily Justin is a very easy going kind of child and it didn't affect him adversely as I had feared. He still talks about how he "did" 2nd grade twice. I wanted to hold him back in Kinder, and in 1st, but the teachers fought me. They fought me when I wanted to do it in 2nd grade too, but we had a meeting with the principal, teacher, counselor and vice principal. Justin has never been happier now in school. It's still not his favorite thing to do (he's definitely ALL boy), but he doesn't struggle with the school work like he used to!! He's now in 4th grade and doing well... stays on the A or AB honor roll.

From this experience I also learned that kids will mature and learn at their own rate. DON'T LET THE SCHOOL TELL YOU WHAT TO DO! He/She is your child and you know what is best for them. Good luck. I know it's frustrating.

Maricris - posted on 01/24/2010

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holding back is no big deal... maybe he's at the stage of finding his own way of studying. that's just the way it is. i use to struggle also with my son. i was not able to force my son to study, he even cries if we try to tutor him. what we did, we talk to him tried to understand why he doesnt want to study. apparently he wants to learn on his own, no tutors.. in the end, he graduated 2nd place on KG. he's on 5th grade now and still with honors... maybe, observation and communication with your kid will help.

Kell - posted on 01/23/2010

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i have read a lot of the posts and great advice
have you had his eye site tested? his hearing? is he at the front of the class or the back?
could he be dyslexic?
im asking these as a few of my friends kids were the same and 1 found out her son couldnt see the board, 1 found out her daughter couldnt hear the teacher..well she could but it was like it was muddled and 1 found out her son was dyslexic....after 5 years in school and getting no where, now they are all doing fantastic, maybe see if she can give him work but in a diff way? some kids just learn differantly than others, one friends son gets the same work as everyone else but its set out differantly as in worded diffarent

Caryn - posted on 01/23/2010

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My opinion is if he is not caught up let him repeat kindergarten. It is better than him being held back later on.

Jennifer - posted on 01/23/2010

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I am a Kindergarten teachers aide and I work in 2 classes where we have repeat kindergarteners. They are totally benefitting from this 2nd go 'round. They are now eager to learn and doing well. Repeating kindergarten isn't all that bad. The kids do not know any different at this age either so socially it's not a big deal

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