how can I help my child with summer reading

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January - posted on 12/31/2013

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Sarah Plain and Tall

Little House in the Big Woods

Little House on The Prairie

Because of Winn Dixie

The War With Grandpa

Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry

Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing

Bud, Not Buddy

I usually pick books from the AR Quiz Store then order them from my local library. www.renlearn.com/store/quiz_home.asp

Tammy - posted on 06/30/2009

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one of the things i do is we pick out a book that is a series for the summer ( if they are older) and we spend part of every afternoon reading together. we take turns he reads a page i read a page, at the end of the chapter i give the option of 1 more chapter or stopping. surprisingly he always opts for another chapter. it is a nice was to spend time together and it also shows him my love for reading as well. it is also a nice break to the day. we stop and talk about what is going on in the book, what he thinks might happen next.... and now that he is older he reads all kinds of books on his own as well as our "special" books

[deleted account]

We have family reading time after supper/before bed each night in our house. This is where you may read to yourself or someone else, but we are all in the living room together. I often read to all the kids, or just to two at a time while the other two read or look at books. My kids are 3,5,7,8 and all the older ones take some time to read and often some time to be read to. They read to their younger siblings or to mom or dad. It works well b/c even if the kids are reading with each other, they see us (mom and dad) reading on our own for entertainment. For the little ones we do this for half an hour before bed and then the older two stay up a half more hour reading. So they get 1/2- 1 hour reading time a day or more if they have read during the day as well.
Our library also has a reading program where you record the books you have read. You do not have to be at the library as we travel alot, but at the end of summer if they have filled the sheet they will get a medal from the library. I don't think paying them to read is such a good idea. We also allow them to read what type of book they want, fiction, non-fiction, comic, ect. As long as we have approved the content. Last night my 7 y/o read The Amazing Activities Handbook. It is a book of 200 activities for kids to do. He read all of them!

Marcelle - posted on 06/28/2009

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I would not be happy to link everything to money. It is hard enough to motivate children later for self esteem and can lead them to think money can solve all problems.

There are many good reading lists, such as https://products.schools.nsw.edu.au/prc/booklist/home.html.

The rule in our house is at least half an hour reading a day. It is good for the mind and the soul, and it more important than games or tv, so must be done first.

Sara - posted on 06/27/2009

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I am a working mom so the library programs are not an easy option in our home (as much as I would love to use them). My son will be in 5th grade. He loves to read, but he loves the TV and Games more. Our family is doing the Financial Peace Program and we have started the kids on the "chores" program. They are paid a certain amount for some of their chores and others are simply required. The deal is that we never ask them to do their chores but if they are not done they do not get paid. We found pretty quickly that for those they must do as part of the family and not for money do not get done. SO, we assigned a negative amount to those. The few chores that are simply a must do will cost them money when they are not done. I do have a point. I have added my son's reading for each day to this list. He simply knows that it must be done and he is not to be watching TV or playing games all day. If he gets the reading done he is good to go. If he chooses not to he will lose money out of what he has earned for his chores. Depending on what he is reading he either has a set amount of time he must read for the day or I will calculate a daily page amount so that a book is finished within a certain period of time. This seems to work for us.

Crystal - posted on 06/26/2009

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Quoting Katherine:

My best advice can only be find something the child adores. We had trouble getting my son to read until we bought a set of 8 board books involving Pokemon - yes that was 10 years ago. Everyone complained that he wouldn't read but once we got his interest going the teachers started complaining that he was reading through recess and hiding books so he could read through Math and such. We created a Monster!



This is SOOO true! I'm a reading teacher in an elem. school and I always get a shocked look when I tell parents or kids to check out things like comic books, magazines, captain underpants books and such. Not the traditional stuff. If they enjoy it, they'll read it and learn new vocabulary. It's a win-win for all!

Katherine - posted on 06/17/2009

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My best advice can only be find something the child adores. We had trouble getting my son to read until we bought a set of 8 board books involving Pokemon - yes that was 10 years ago. Everyone complained that he wouldn't read but once we got his interest going the teachers started complaining that he was reading through recess and hiding books so he could read through Math and such. We created a Monster!

Jessica - posted on 06/17/2009

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thanks so much for the input on this one...I'll have to check around & see if there are any reading camps around town...thanks again

Melissa - posted on 06/16/2009

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My children love rewards so we have a reading folder and when they read we write it in. 10min counts for grade 1-2, 15-20min for grade 3-4, 30mins for grade 5-6. We then have targets. So if they have 20 entries they may get a small reward. If they get to 100 they may get a bigger reward. It depends on the child and what their hot button is. Also last summer holidays the local library ran a reading competition with rewards which was fantastic.

Sandra - posted on 06/16/2009

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Quoting Christina:

This fall I will have a 1st Grader and a 5th Grader and what I started last summer was a reading program I put together one for fun and two because I didn't want them to watch tv every night. I checked their school's web page and printed off a list of recommended books the teachers posted. I then made a worksheet for both of them that required them to read as many books as they wanted but the catch was that with each book read they were given fake money or their choice of a prize. At the end of each month they could turn in their money for real money and spend it or save it. It gave them something to look forward too because they never knew what to expect and after each book was read and they received their prize it gave them the incentive to read more and before you know it they were asking for new worksheets. I noticed such an improvement in both of their reading skills and even in their speech especially my youngest who was just learning how to read in kindergarten.


I really like the idea of fake money. I am going to use this idea with my son this year.

Sandra - posted on 06/16/2009

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The city I live in our Library has a reading program and they give out prizes to the children who read the most books. I also take flash cards with dolch words on them which helps my sons reading and spelling. If your library doesn't have these programs do it your self and at the end of the summer let your children buy something for your children. For every book they read maybe 10 cents or choose a amount???? do it on a chart system. You can do this with other moms so your children have other friends reading also.

Christina - posted on 06/16/2009

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This fall I will have a 1st Grader and a 5th Grader and what I started last summer was a reading program I put together one for fun and two because I didn't want them to watch tv every night. I checked their school's web page and printed off a list of recommended books the teachers posted. I then made a worksheet for both of them that required them to read as many books as they wanted but the catch was that with each book read they were given fake money or their choice of a prize. At the end of each month they could turn in their money for real money and spend it or save it. It gave them something to look forward too because they never knew what to expect and after each book was read and they received their prize it gave them the incentive to read more and before you know it they were asking for new worksheets. I noticed such an improvement in both of their reading skills and even in their speech especially my youngest who was just learning how to read in kindergarten.

Jaime - posted on 06/16/2009

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Our school board offers a summer reading camp for grade 1 and 2 students. It is the parents responsibility to drive them to the specific school the camp is being offered at. The kids have a blast, and walk away knowing so many tricks to help them read. My daughter went last summer (she was really having difficulties reading) and came out reading just below a grade 1 level, this school year she has worked with her tutor at school and is reading at a high grade 1 level. She is going to reading camp again this summer and is so excited. Check with your school board and see if they offer anything like this.

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