i have a son that is almost nine and still wets the bed at night , does anyone know of anything that might help ????

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Megan - posted on 06/13/2013

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I have a child who wet the bed nightly (often several times) until he was 8 years old. At first, I just invested in a couple pair of washable, waterproof underwearhttp://astore.amazon.com/bravandgrac-20?... this webpage has lots to choose from in lots of different sizes even waterproof boxers. And used a waterproof sheet protectorhttp://astore.amazon.com/bravandgrac-20?... to minimize the laundry.

At the age of seven the bedwetting began to chip away at his self esteem. We solved his bed wetting by using an alarm. A child who wets at night has a sleep pattern in which the brain does not react to the full bladder signal. The alarm gradually trains the child's brain to react. He went from being wet every single night to completely dry in about 6 weeks. The bed wetting alarm http://astore.amazon.com/bravandgrac-20?... has given us years of dry nights.

My child absolutely loved the children's book, Prince Bravery and Grace - Attack of the Wet Knights http://astore.amazon.com/bravandgrac-20/... . It is the story of a young prince who struggles with "the Wet Knights" and eventually defeats them by using an alarm. It's funny yet empathetic and gave him the understanding and motivation to end the bed wetting. The best advice for parents about how to stop bedwetting I found is the book, Seven Steps to Nighttime Dryness, by Renee Mercer. Invest in the books-they make the process so much easier, then an alarm -its the best decision I ever made.www.braveryandgrace.com

Stephanie - posted on 02/11/2009

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I tried to limit his liquids but it did not matter. My sons doctor told us that some kids wet until well into their teen years and it is not uncommon. My son would just sleep so hard that nothing would wake him up, not even wetting. He would just wake up wet and then when he was 11 1/2 years old I decided to try medication but before I even started to give it to him he started to stay dry. It happened that fast, just one day he quite wetting. I know it is hard especially with sleep overs but what I would do is send a zip lock bag with so that he could put his pull-up in there and bring it home to throw it away instead of risking his friends finding it. It worked out great. He is happy now that he does not wet though.

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We limit liquids after 7 and before we go to bed at 11 or midnight, we take them to the potty and make sure they go. I have heard of pills which can sometimes help and are good for sleep overs - so they don't have to worry as much about wetting the bed at a friend's house. Also, a friend of mine set herself an alarm at 4 in the morning - her son was wet. So she moved it to 3, checked him... Set it to 2 and so on. She eventually figured out what time he was wetting the bed, started getting up to take him to the bathroom and very gradually made the time she got him later and later until eventually he was making it through the night on his own.

Lori - posted on 02/10/2009

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We started DDAVP on my daughter when she was 8 (she's 13 now).  She took two pills a night before going to bed and she only had one accident and was off the pills in 6 months.  Insurance picked up most of the cost of the pills but I remember they were expensive - BUT, when you're not buying pull-ups anymore, it evens out and it's only for 6 months.  We will start our second daughter on these pills when she turns 8 this summer.

Tania - posted on 02/09/2009

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My sister used to wet the bed as a child.  It stopped when she was about 13 years old.  Some childrens' bladders don't grow as fast as the rest of them do.  She saw a doctor who gave her a nasal spary to use right before bedtime and it worked.  I don't know what it was called but you should consult your family doctor.



good luck!

Amybeth - posted on 02/09/2009

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It is nothing to worry too much about right now. My 7 year old daughter still does and the doctor said that as long as they are potty trained during the day he doesn't worry about the night. Plus we have that running in our family. My daughter is the first girl though! Everyone else in my family has been males that have had this problem.

Marcelle - posted on 02/09/2009

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I agree with Jennie. It took 2 weeks for the alarm to work with my son, as he is a really heavy sleeper. We finally used it when he was about 9, as he had to go on a school camp. In the last 2 years, since then. there has been one accident, which could happen to anyone. We had never used meds on our doctor's advice that they were only good for the dose taken, i,e. no curative properties.



Those 2 weeks where the alarm woke us to woke my son were not pleasant, but we are so glad we stuck with it.

Jennie - posted on 02/09/2009

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My son is 8 and he still wets the bed too.  However, we are working with a bed alarm (since mid October) and it has helped tremendously.  I have tried him on 2 different kinds of medication (recommended by his ped) and they didn't help.  The doctor wasn't too sure of bed alarms, but I thought it was worth a try.  I'm so glad I did.  I did a lot of research on the different brands and ended up purchasing the Roger's wireless alarm.  I originally ordered the Wet Stop 3 (I think) but it wasn't wireless and when I tried to attach it to my son the first night he didn't want to wear it.  The device attached to the sleeve of their shirt and a wire goes from it, down their shirt to the sensor on the underwear.  Not very comfortable to sleep with.  So, I ended up paying quite a bit more for the wireless kind.  I am very pleased with the results.  In the first week he had reduced his wetting and now is dry most nights.  He's still using the alarm (supposed to use until dry for 14 nights in a row and we haven't reached that yet).  It wakes them up with a loud beeping as soon as there is a speck of urine that reaches the sensor, so it teaches him what it feels like to have the need to go and wake up, get out of bed and finish in the toilet.  They have to get up to turn the alarm off, so it works.  My son is a very heavy sleeper and he can do this.  Anyway, I could go on an on, but I am so glad I got this.  It was worth every penny for my son and me.  I was really tired of changing and washing sheets EVERYDAY!  He would soak through the goodnights almost nightly, so this really is a big improvement.  Check it out on www.thebedwettingstore.com  I looked on all kinds of sights and unfortuneately, the Rogers system is not any cheaper anywhere else.  I did end up buying 2 extra pairs of underwear, which I don't need now, but found that I needed it in the beginning, because he wet more than twice a night then.  Once the pants are wet, you have to wash and dry before using again.  Hope this helps!  Jennie

Jo - posted on 02/09/2009

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Hi i don't think it is uncommon, i have a 9 and half year old boy and he still wets the bed. what we do is my husband lifts him late at night to go to the toliet and this stops the bed from getting wet. Hope this helps.

Amanda - posted on 02/09/2009

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Besides nothing to drink, a friend of mine told me that her pediatrician said nothing to eat either, after a certain time.  This worked with my daughter.  That, and also we INSIST that she pees after brushing her teeth.  It's part of her bedtime routine.  If she forgets, never fails...she has to wake up to pee at night.

Catherine - posted on 02/09/2009

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My oldest child didn't stop wetting the bed until shortly after his 11th birthday.  He wet everynight and quite heavy.  He'd often overflow the goodnights.  One day he just stopped. My daughter is 10 1/2 and still wets everynight, but not as heavy as her brother.  We have hope she will stop soon.  My youngest stopped wetting the bed at 3 1/2.  We tried medication, but it didn't work.  It did make it so they didn't pee as much but at  $9/night it wasn't worth it.  The goodnights worked the best.   I've talked to 2 doctors and they both said the same thing, most kids will stop around 11 or 12.    Talking to other moms they seem to have had the same experience.  My only advice is to hang in there, and don't let it worry you.  Make it easy for them, I always keep a diaper pail under the bathroom sink near the kids bedrooms, and that way nobody else has to know they where goodnights.   My dd has told a couple of close friends, but she is able to disguise it well when she goes for sleepovers, so it isn't an issue.  Good luck.

Kathy - posted on 02/09/2009

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do you limit the amount he has to drink at night? My stepdaughter used to have issues and we told her no drink about 7 and made sure she went to the bathroom before she went to bed. Obviously your son must be a very heavy sleeper. Hope this helps a little bit.

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