my sons teacher thinks he may have add i dont he is a normal 6 year old boy he may be a little headstrong but not add help

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Dawn - posted on 01/15/2009

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Wow lots of teacher bashing here... as a teacher myself I might suggest that sometimes teachers who are new or inexperienced might talk to a parent and suggest ADD or ADHD out of desperation or misinformation. Obviously the parents know best. I will suggest that based on age and grade the first thing to look at with a child who seems to act up is whether or not he or she is having trouble reading, seeing, or hearing. Ask the teacher specifically about that. My own son was having behavioral issues in kindergarten because he couldn't hear well. Once we addressed what was causing his hearing issues, then his behavior went back to normal for his age. Behavior issues at young ages are usually related to skills deficits, not true ADHD. Then I might ask if there have been any major changes at home...behavior issues might sometimes be related to that as well. I would never go the ADD/ADHD route with a parent--and teachers shouldn't--they should mention behavior and academic concerns with parents and they should ask the school psychologist or behavior specialist for some tips on how to deal with the behavior of the child. It is up to the behavior specialist or school psychologist to make those concerns to the parents. Teachers who immediately go the ADD/ADHD route are not doing the best job they can--they are trying to get a quick fix for the behavior rather than trying to help solve the underlying issues of the cause. Take it from a special education teacher.

Jennifer - posted on 01/13/2009

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I feel there are waaay too many children that are diagnosed ADD/ADHD and put them on mind altering drugs that have long term negative effects on living a healthy adult life.I am not saying that all kids are diagnosed wrongly, IMHO there are some that really do have a chemical imbalance...but those are in the minority.



My sister had a teacher try to convince her that her son was ADD...my sister did have him evaluated, and the psychologist made the determination that he was NOT ADD...but the teacher still badgered him...In Junior High a teacher had his intelligence tested and found out he was off the charts...genius, and just bored with the normal school work.



Something else you might look into is diet...High Fructose Corn Syrup, a lot of processed foods that are nutritionally deficient...(most snacks you find in a grocery store, juices, pops, etc) are a huge contributor to kids being overactive.



Another issue, is boundaries...kids need healthy boundaries enforced. There is security in knowing what to expect.



For instance, I was at a 4-H event where my kids and I were helping paint some stalls for the coming Fair. There was a little boy there (I think kindergardner) who thought he would be silly and paint the other kids. His mom told him stop....several times, but did nothing to enforce it. He got progressively wilder, running around laughing, painting everything, to the point he was chasing my kids with the paint brush. His mom asked him to stop again, then went on to ignore him...This little boy then went out and flung paint all over my car! The mother came out and said that it was all my kids' fault for getting him wound up, as he was ADD and couldn't help it or stop himself...She did ask him to clean off my car, but then walked away once again and did nothing to enforce what she asked him to do...This kid would not listen to anyone, and my kids and I went to work cleaning off the car.



I do not claim to be a professional, but this boy had no problem sitting still and concentrating on anything that he wanted to do...My guess is that if that mom were to show that she really meant it when she said stop...The First Time....it would make a huge difference in his behaviour, and maybe he wouldn't have to take the mind altering drugs.



Remember, this is my unprofessional opinion, and is not meant to judge anyone. These are just my honest thoughts on the issue.



There is some really good parenting help that you can find online..just google "Parenting with Love and Logic". You might be able to find books and videos by these people at your local library on how to handle strong willed children.

Crystal - posted on 01/17/2009

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One of those things are being the type of child who learns best by doing, rather than sitting in one spot and listening or looking. Instead of reading words, they have to hold them, touch them, be active. Its a learning style, and it is often tossed in the ADD category because those children have a hard time with learning by lecture. If your gut tells you he's fine, stick to your guns, no one knows your child better than you.

Jamie - posted on 01/15/2009

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My sister had this very issue.  She brought her son to school the next week and told the teacher (per recommendation of their family physician) they had seen a dr. and he was taking something.  (He was NOT.)  Low and behold the teacher remarked each day for the next week how very well behaved he was.  She never got another note from the teacher regarding behavior issues. 

Patricia - posted on 01/14/2009

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Agree with Jennifer Simpson. I would also recommend 'banning electricity' like I do with my kids. Reduce/control access to the TV, computer, Wii, plus any other do-dads that have been linked to higher probability of ADD. My kids are allowed one movie a week and no TV. Computer and Wii are limited too. They are happy and healthy and read voraciously (I believe) as a result. Get rid of the temptations and sources for arguments- Disney Channel was elimated and with it tons of frustration and arguments!



Good luck!

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Vivien - posted on 03/25/2014

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SOMETIMES A GOOD 'bash' is needed. Legally teachers are not allowed to diagnose medical issues. ADD,ADHD,Autism,Asperger's,etc are all medical issues and although educators deal with these result of these medical issues they are not allowed to diagnose anymore than they should diagnose a broken arm. Teachers can get into huge trouble for doing this.

Vivien - posted on 03/25/2014

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It was very unprofessional of the teacher to try and diagnose your child's problem. If you have doubts,worries about your child's behavior it would be your best interest to talk to a pediatrician. Too often medications are used to tame a child this can lead to far more serious problems down the road . If your child is disruptive and off task in school . You need to come up with a way to combat this behavior. A school behavior specialist can be brought in to observe your child and the specialist can shown the teacher how to better deal with the student/s who are not on task. I hate to knock my chosen profession but there are a disproportionate number of very young inexperienced teachers in the area of early childhood- it takes a lot of energy. But once hey start having families of their own a lot of them change grade levels.

Qurina - posted on 01/17/2009

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My daughter is now 7 but last year at school her teacher said she was either add or adhd and I didnt believe her one bit.. they recommened I take to to doctors and a behavorial health expert to do further testing and I did.. I then found out that there was nothing wrong with her, she was just being simply hard headed...

Crystal - posted on 01/17/2009

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Quoting Heather:

A typical ADHD child can not sit still for a short period of time. What grade is your son in right now, Kindergarden or 1st grade? I noticed that my step son had issues with behavior, attention span, and figitting years two years before he entered Kendergarden. My husband didn't believe that he had a problem and ignored me. Since I stay home with the kids, I saw more than he did. I know that teachers aren't doctors, however, they do experience many types of personalities all day for most of the calendar year. My son would just get out of his chair and spin in circles are just walk around the room. If he was coloring or just sitting watching a movie, he would not sit still or be quiet. He would sit there making a humming noise that never stopped. You don't need a counselor, you just take him to his pediatric doctor. The doctor will ask you some questions and then give you a survey for you, your husband and his teacher to fill out and return to him. Once he has reviewed the two surveys he will make the call wheather your son qualifies as ADHD. Another thing, ADHD is hereditary. Is there anyone on either side of the family that had it?


High energy kids especially will do that when they are bored. I have a stream of report cards of my youth expressing how distracted I was and it was the current activity or the curriculum... not me.

Theresa - posted on 01/15/2009

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Well, I would talk to the principal and telling by thier reaction look into a new school. I had to homeschool for the remainder of that year until we moved out of the city in a really good school district.

Theresa - posted on 01/15/2009

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My son was in Catholic school for kindergarten and his teacher was saying the same thing and although i would never medicate him I still wanted to do anything we could to help. I asked her what type pf things he was doing and basically he ewas being a BOY! He never interuppted, was inappropriate, got out of his seat, hurt anyone, etc. Basically, when I pressed her she said he was annoying. Needless to say we spoke with his pediatrician who said no way. We tried to work with his teacher and it was a horrible year. She was mean to him and he started crying because he didn't want to go anymore. I toolk him out and homeschooled him for the remainder of 1st grade. we have since moved into a great suburban school district and are midway through 2nd grade and he is doing fabulous!!!! Great grades as always, and great behavior reports. Not that he is an angel, he is a boy, and a child. The fact is some teachers don't like some kids, and they are not doctors. I was told by my doctor that you as a mom would know deep down there was something different and I didn't think there was. Good luck! But just don't let  anyone tear down your childs confidence and self-esteem.

Tina - posted on 01/15/2009

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The peadiatricians have a test for this Have him tested Teachers can be manipulative

Debbie - posted on 01/14/2009

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My daughter is in second grade and since kindergarten I have been told that she may have ADHD but they wanted to watch her to be sure. They took extra steps in class to see if they could do anything to help her out. She had trouble following more than one or two directions at a time and she seemed to space out a lot. She never had behavioral problems but they were worried about her when she moved to the next grade level. She's now in second grade and I just had a meeting with them again. Part of me does think that there could be something going on with her. She even made the comment a year or so ago that her brain isn't working right when she couldn't remember something. I'm about to take her to our family physician to have her tested and then to figure out what I want to do. I'll probably just start with her diet since if she does have ADHD I don't think it's a severe case. I've read with ADHD changing their diets can help out a lot - no enriched or white flour, limit sugar and artificial sugars, high fructose syrup, artificial colors and flavors, and such like that.

Heather - posted on 01/13/2009

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A typical ADHD child can not sit still for a short period of time. What grade is your son in right now, Kindergarden or 1st grade? I noticed that my step son had issues with behavior, attention span, and figitting years two years before he entered Kendergarden. My husband didn't believe that he had a problem and ignored me. Since I stay home with the kids, I saw more than he did. I know that teachers aren't doctors, however, they do experience many types of personalities all day for most of the calendar year. My son would just get out of his chair and spin in circles are just walk around the room. If he was coloring or just sitting watching a movie, he would not sit still or be quiet. He would sit there making a humming noise that never stopped. You don't need a counselor, you just take him to his pediatric doctor. The doctor will ask you some questions and then give you a survey for you, your husband and his teacher to fill out and return to him. Once he has reviewed the two surveys he will make the call wheather your son qualifies as ADHD. Another thing, ADHD is hereditary. Is there anyone on either side of the family that had it?

Charlynn - posted on 01/13/2009

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I think teachers are too overwhelmed with big class sizes so any child who acts like one is singled out as having a problem.  He's 6 he's supposed to be active.  Especially if he's a boy.  Tell when she has a phd after her name then she can diagnoses your child.

Casey - posted on 01/12/2009

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Teachers are not always right. My suggestion would be to see a child psychologist or a counselor who specializes in children and get their oppinion as well as your pediatrician. At 6, boys are generally a bit hyper active and have short attention spans. It's hard to accurately diagnose ADD. Please get an expert opinion and go from there.

Jeanelle - posted on 01/12/2009

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my son was diagnosed with ADHD about a month ago and for the longest time i didnt think anything was wrong until he started school this year, if you dont mind me asking what kind of things are he doing in class and do you notice any certain behaviors at home also?

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