What age should your child start chores and how much allowance is OK?

Michelle - posted on 06/03/2011 ( 160 moms have responded )

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I have an almost seven year old daughter who needs to learn responsibility . What chores do you think are acceptable and what about reward system or allowance?

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Christy - posted on 06/03/2011

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I think it's good to start having kids help with chores at age 2. I'm not kidding! Make picking up their toys a game. Have them help you unload the dish washer. Give them a wet rag and they can help you clean the walls. Set them up to the sink beside you to "help" with dishes. I know they'll be soaked, but they love the time with mommy and for the most part it's positive attention!

I started giving my kids an allowance about the time they're 5. I guess it depends on how old all the kids are and how much you have to budget. My kids get $1 for every year they are old. They also have three chores a day they are expected to do, sometimes more!

My youngest is 7. He sets the table, clears the table, takes out the garbage, helps bring the empty garbage bins back to the house on garbage day, washes his own laundry (I don't worry about sorting), helps put it away, (I often help fold it still), unload half the dishwasher, scrub the toilet and the bathroom mirror, wash walls, put away his toys, and feed the pets. He has older siblings that also help with these chores, so he is not expected to do them everyday.

There's a book called "WORK: Wonderful Opportunity for Raising Responsible Kids." It's a fast read and the mom that wrote it explains that you put your child in training. You teach them how the chore is done, then observe each time guiding until they can do it well, about 80% as good as you could do it. She has a huge list in the back of the book of what chores you can expect your kids to do at what ages. Honestly I have my kids doing a bit more at younger ages, but the book was a huge help to me in organizing chores for my kids!

The rule at our house is they don't get any privileges 'til their chores are done. That means no TV, computer, friends, etc. The three chores should only take a few minutes. My youngest is typically done with his in five to ten minutes. He loves his computer time, so he doesn't complain about getting his chores done! Some days he'll get up early and do his chores and then get on the computer before his older siblings wake up and hog the computer!

My allowance philosophy is that I don't buy the kids stuff at the store. If they want something, they can do extra chores to earn more money, or just save up their allowance. I neglected to mention that they receive their allowance every payday for us, which is twice a month. Whatever collections they are working on or new toy they want, they can either wait 'til birthday, or Christmas, or save up and get it them self!

Nathalie - posted on 06/04/2011

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We have 3 children, 9 yrs, 6 yrs and 4 yrs. All have chores to do do ranging on their ages. The 9 year old has to clean mirrors and windows, the 6 year old feeds the dogs every day, the 4 year old helps me empty the dishwasher and water the flowers - if i have a busy day cleaning they all muck in, dusting etc. They have to keep their own rooms tidy and tidy up after themselves (this isn't a chore, just a daily responsibility. I myself started young, emptying the bottom part of the dishwasher and my sister the top, i believe its great to teach them responsibilities, plus it helps me.
They each have $5 a week pocket money - this can be deducted through behaviour though - use of bad words, or fighting or back chatting will have 50 cents knocked from their pocket money. A mark is put by their name when they break the rules and at the end of the week we add it up and they receive the amount that is left. Then it is up to them if they want to spend the money or save it. This system has really helped the kids control their behaviour. If they want to earn more money to save up for something, they ask me for extra jobs....raking the grass after it has been mowed, helping with the washing - there are always jobs to be done! lol

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 06/03/2011

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For a 7 year old? She can clean her room, help with vacuuming, gather dishes for washing, can help with outdoor chores...anything that is age appropriate! And you should probably start soon, otherwise she's going to argue that you've never made her do anything before...

By that age, both of my kids were doing different chores, which included dog poop duty, recycling duty (separating and processing recyclables), sorting laundry, putting away dishes, and they were expected (not as chores) to keep their rooms clean, and their common living areas straightened up.

As far as allowance, I don't believe in one. If a child does the chores assigned to them, then we talk about what they might like to do during the weekend (evenings in the summer), or if they would like to save for a specific thing. We just don't hand out money. I felt that if I were to "give" them an allowance, I'd be inviting argument later. I grew up without one. My parents assigned monetary value to the things that needed to be done around the house and yard. Each time we completed a job, we logged it, and were paid at the end of the week. We were NOT allowed to spend that money either, it went into our piggy banks. Since I didn't agree with that, my hubby and I came up with the system of discussing their desires and helping them make good spending choices (ONLY after they have taken care of their responsibilities)

Monica - posted on 06/12/2011

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Each child should have a role or responsibility in the house that actually does not require payment. If they want to go over and above the call of duty then paying them is ok, but i think it's a mistake to "reward" kids for taking part in the family chores. Even the smallest child can have a role, weather it's watering plants, cleaning up toys, feeding the family pet etc.

Melissa - posted on 06/04/2011

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I have a 10 year old and a 8 year old. I have created chore charts (things that need to be done such as brushing their teeth, doing their homework, not arguing, taking dishes to the sink, gathering dirty laundry and putting it in the laundry room etc.) these things I do not pay for, they are expected. We also live with my mom as she has had mobility problems and needs us so one of their things (I have a chart for each of them) they have to help Grandma 1x a day. Then I have a couple of charts that I call above and beyonds, things I do not expect them to do but if they do it I write their initial on that square (like helping grandma after they helped her 1x, helping mom, helping dad, Helping with dishes, helping with laundry, sweeping the porch, picking up sticks in the yard etc) for the above and beyonds I award them .10 per square. We just do not have the money to pay an allowance but I want to reward them at the same time. for the have to do's I reward them with chips that they can turn in for computer time or wii time, that way they do not just get lazy free time without earning it, each chip is worth 15 min and during school time they can only cash in 4 chips a day. It works for us and it can be modified to each family's have to and above and beyonds. I want them to eventually learn that blessing someone by helping them is a reward in itself.

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Nancy - posted on 05/14/2013

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My son is 6 years old...just started chores that pays an allowance...i sat down with him and asked him what he thought he was capable of doing ....he made his own list.:) 1. feed his fish, 2. take out all trash in the house out to the dumpster....3. with windex he gets to wipe clean all glass surfaces in the house....4. watcr all plants inside and outside the house:(water the lawn is part of it) we made him a neat chart that is on the fridge and he checks off the chores he has done every day:) and once the week is over he was suppose to get 6 dollars:) as he is 6 years old:) buttttttt....he has such a great attitude while doing his chores and even hummms while completing them that i explained to him that i loved his attitude :) we went up 2 more dollars :) hes a great little guy with a big heart:) and this is just on the side of him cleaning up after himself:) he knows the drill :)

Lisa - posted on 07/20/2012

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have a girl who is 5 (about to be 6 in a few weeks) and what I do is have a list of chores that she can do on the refrigerator door and have each chore pay a various amount of money. well every Friday will tally up what she did and pay her. (she has been a work horse this summer. she is gonna send me to the poor house)

I think this teaches them responsibility and will hopefully give her ga decent work ethic.

Amber - posted on 07/16/2012

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My 5 year old son helps out and does chores around the house now.. But nothing that is a YOU MUST DO.. It is easier for me though with being a working mom from home..

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Mary - posted on 07/11/2012

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Actually any age you choose is fine, the younger you start them the easier it is to add to their chores as they get older. (Mother of four kids, 2 now over 18, and 2 under 12) I started my older 2 around 7yrs. old doing the trash and of course keeping their room picked up and cleaned. We used to have carpets that they vacuumed but when we switched they went to sweeping and mopping rather easily. As they got older I added loading and unloading the dishwasher, dusting, whatever you need help with can be a chore. Beware I still do the bathroom chores as no one wants to clean the toilet and I expect the toilet to be cleaner than one swipe of a toilet brush will clean. What you pay is up to you as well. If say the kids love going to the movies, you can use that as a reward, or renting a movie of their choice. I pay them a straight wage because with four kids you have a varity of likes and dislikes, that away they can each buy what they want. Also, it helps cut back on "Mom can I have..." I can now answer save your allowance up and buy it yourself. What you work out chore-wise and reward-wise is purely up to you. If you can not think of anything ask your child, but remember they always seem to want a lot more, than what work they are usually doing; but who knows they may under pay themselves. Something I also do is if the child does extra chores, I reward them with a little extra cash. One week I come down with the flu, as a mother you continue to work through it even though you feel like staying in bed. My youngest, knowing mom felt really bad took the laundry downstairs, seperated the clothes and actually had his older sibling start the laundry for him and then folded the clothes when they finished. Now his folding was tongue in cheek, but the fact he did it without being asked and during a time I needed the help, I gave him extra cash for doing so. You will also find that some chores they don't mind doing and others that they hate. You can actually use this to your advantage and swap chores around say that you hate to do, that they don't mind. Personally I hate mowing and yard work my boys love to mow and do the yardwork, ok love is maybe too strong, so we swapped I do the bathroom they do the mowing. We are both happy with the end results. Good luck on what you decide.

Allison - posted on 07/10/2012

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It is a good age. She can clean the bathroom, vacuum, dust, dishes, really anything. We paid our kids $5.00 a week for doing chores, which then teaches them how to deal with money and how to save, etc.

Kristie - posted on 07/05/2012

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my oldest daughter also has the job of getting wet clothes out of the washer she hands them to her sisters and she puts them into the dryer. Of course there's some clothes left in washer for me to get. Son gets the dirty clothes. Maybe in a few years they can start earning some spending money when they consistently do their "jobs". They like that they have jobs that they do. Susie throws a fit if anyone puts the bar in and starts the dishwasher, which once a month we let her sister lock and start. They have alot less responsibility or chores then I did growing up. I told the older 2 that one can help Susie with her math and the other can help with reading(don't know how long that will last come school time but.... atleast they are willing to help her)

Kristie - posted on 07/05/2012

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my kids have to pick up their rooms(that's a given) but other than that my son takes the garbage out my 7 yr old daughter takes the empty cans out to side of garage(after she puts them in the can can) and youngest takes empty boxes to big garbage can. They don't get allowance yet. Also my youngest puts the dish bar in dishwasher and locks and starts it.

Julie - posted on 07/04/2012

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My boys have helped out since they could walk. And they both walked early...9 months old. They helped put dishes away, make coffee, pull weeds, pick up leaves. Now they are 7&10. They have daily responsibilities to maintain there own space (bedroom/bathroom) and an additional chore list, which they rotate. Garbage, walk dog, poop scoop and laundry bins. We do not pay our boys an allowance for helping maintain the household. However, They can "earn minutes for screen time" by doing additional chores...washing the car, vacuuming ect. We do however pay them for going to school. Like an adult, school is there job. We get paid to go to work, and the better the job the more the money. So, the better the grades the more the cash. They get weekly payment based on there performance, if they put it in the bank, my husband will double it. It averages out to be 6-10.00 a week.

Travis - posted on 06/30/2012

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I have four kids...yes its a full time job! I was always overwhelmed and felt like I wasn't doing a good job at anything. I researched cleaning recommendations for frequencies and then came up with a plan using index cards. My friends loved it and I made them for them and eventually began selling them online. You can check it out at www.springcleanyearround.blogspot.com
It saved my life!! It has recommendations for chores children can do at their age too. I award them with video game/ipod time/computer games. No chores, no screen time! They beg for some chores!!

Carolyn - posted on 06/15/2012

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I never agreed with giving monetary allowanced for chores, which are a responsibility of everyone that live in the home. For a seven year old.....that's simple.....once they are praised for a job well done it gratifies them to no end.....however, a little treat here and there along with the praising is great incentive. Chores such as being responsible to keep their areas tidy...Always assure them if they need help you are there.........It's participating them in the little things then grow on that as they get older and have the understanding of the importance of responsiblity........It helps build on their character........

Crissida - posted on 06/12/2012

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She can clean her room, help with laundry such as putting her cloths away after you fold. Help you Put dishes away.

Cynthia - posted on 06/12/2012

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i agree with Toshia, they should start learning to clean the mess they make as soon as they start making them. no money for them just one of lives lessons.

Cynthia - posted on 06/11/2012

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I have a 14 year old and a 5 year old. I started the oldest doing chores at 4, just folding the wash cloths and matching the socks and she loved that. As for the 5 year old she started at 2 1/2 only because she saw her sister folding the wash cloths and matching the socks and she has taken over that chore.

As for allowance I go by their age. ie., if she is 5, her allowance is $5.00.

I hope this was helpful:)

Carlie - posted on 06/01/2012

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Now. Remember when your daughter saw you doing laundry when she was 1 or 2 years old? Shoulda started then....by making it the fun game we parents all know and love (laughing)....

Seriously. Now though......I think she should definately be held accountable the cleanliness and WEEKLY maintenance of her bedroom and/or bathroom. You don't want to give her too much to do, or she will get resentful....regardless of how much allowance you give her.

I started giving my daughter an allowance at age 3 1/2. Perhaps a wee bit young, but then she is quite advanced and mature for her peer age. I opened a savings account for her at age 5, matter of fact, on her 5th birthday. She has 75.00 dollars in her account, and I put a stipulation on it, that I am not allowed to withdraw from it, unless it's an emergency. She makes weekly deposits, and she is allowed no more than 15.00 dollars a month in withdrawals.

She is responsible for keeping her room cleaned on a WEEKLY basis and straightened on a DAILY basis. For this, if completed, she earns 1.00 a day, or approximately 28.00 dollars a month. Should she decide to take the initiative, a definition she asked about a long time ago, then I reward her with 2.00 extra dollars. She takes the initiative quite frequently. When she does not follow the rules, her consequence is losing however many dollars a day it goes undone.

It is important that we, as parents, instill a sense of pride and understanding in working hard for the things you want most. I applaud your efforts to do the same. Regardless of what you and she choose to do, keep in mind the AWESOME lessons you will both be instilling in each other and getting from each other.

Have fun with it! :)

Elizabeth - posted on 03/06/2012

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allowance? ALLOWANCE? you live in the house for free...you eat free food and you make a total mess out the house...you're lucky I'm not charging you let alone paying you



LOL that's a little extreme and a joke



I don't think allowance is necessary however. I provide all basics and extra's for my children. I expect them to help with certain things and they can learn money managment with birthday money and toothfairy money.

Penny - posted on 03/06/2012

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start now. dishes - vacuuming - take out the garbage - feed the dog - as she wants more money and gets older give her more chores and more money for them. put a $ value on the chores and if all the chores are not done she gets nothing. that way she can't pick and choose.

Kelly - posted on 03/05/2012

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I think I was about this age when I started chores. If you have a dog, ask them to clean up the poop. My dad would have my brother and I kill spiders outside for a nickel a piece, we had a lot of them. Cleaning up their room is something too. Hope this helps.

Charleen - posted on 11/21/2011

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My daughter gets a star at the end of the day if she does everything she is asked to do which is one thing per yr she is going to be 6 very soon and she cleans up her room picks up her things in the living room puts clothes in the laundry room listens and clears the dinner table. I have had her on this for a few months and thus far it is working after a 2 week period of no more than 3 check marks then she can go horseback riding. I would do it as early as possible my son is going to be 2 and his chore will be his toys and clothes with the same system but his reward will be a day at the jumping place or something at the mall playgroup.

Charleen - posted on 11/21/2011

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My daughter gets a star at the end of the day if she does everything she is asked to do which is one thing per yr she is going to be 6 very soon and she cleans up her room picks up her things in the living room puts clothes in the laundry room listens and clears the dinner table. I have had her on this for a few months and thus far it is working after a 2 week period of no more than 3 check marks then she can go horseback riding. I would do it as early as possible my son is going to be 2 and his chore will be his toys and clothes with the same system but his reward will be a day at the jumping place or something at the mall playgroup.

R - posted on 11/16/2011

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I think it's good to teach your children responsibility amongst the family and that if everyone helps out in a small way it makes life easier for everyone. Reward systems are good when consistent, some people find it hard to keep up with them, but praise love and gratitude goes a long way too.

Barbara - posted on 11/15/2011

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My 7 year old gets 10.00 a week to keep her room clean, she makes her bed, makes sure all clothes are put in the laundry basket and feeds her animals. Her dishes go in the sink. She gets up in the morning and is dressed, and her face washed and hair brushed. I think it is too soon to be having her do dishes but she wants to help with all that also. I think as soon as she is tall enough to reach the washing machine and sink she will be doing dishes and her own laundry. I know a lot of people don't believe in allowance because they should be doing this stuff anyways but at the same time she is learning the value of a dollar and is saving her money until she has enough to buy something special. She has saved up months of allowance so I would say she is learning the right way!

Joanna - posted on 11/13/2011

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My son was around 2 when he started. At 3 he loved to help vacuum, help make beds. Now at 9 he pretty much does everything including his own laundry ( started this at 6), I think his favorite is cleaning the bathroom. He knows that I really can't afford to give him an allowance so what we do is keep track of the chores he does daily on a calendar with a star and days he refuses to do them no star is given. At the end of the month if there are more than 15 stars then I give him the choice of either $20 or going to a fun center, movie, or something. If he chooses the money he knows that automatically at least $5 has to go into his savings account. It seems to work pretty good for us and there have been times that he has wanted to put the whole $20 in savings.

Katherine - posted on 11/13/2011

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Hello Michelle

I started my kids with little chores when they were 5 years old. My oldest daughter 9 years old, told me one day that she should not have to do chores- so of course reminded her that I would not be comming over to her place when she moves out to do her housework- she will learn to do it on her own. I got online to find age appropriate chores for my kids and shared it with her.
So i would go online and find a site to help you figure out what will work best for your child.

Cynthia - posted on 11/13/2011

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My 6 yea old does his own laundry. every Saturday he loads his laundry, he knows how much soap to use. he puts them in the dryer and when they are clean, he picks out 5 underwear 5 pair of pants and matching 5 pair of socks. all i have to do is pick a shirt fro each day and put it in his dresser and hes good to go all week. then on Sunday he takes out the trash and loads the dishwasher. the other days he just does his homework and clean his room each night. he never gets money he get toys for his spelling test if he gets 100. he gets to spend $5 and under for any extra help. my sister cant believe he does his own laundry but thats his Saturday. he takes a lot of pride in being a big boy and he likes how shocked people are when i tell them he does it.

Bridget - posted on 11/12/2011

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~* This is an interesting question. The earlier the better. Especially if you have 2 or 3 kids or more. And are the only parent in the house with a spouse that works out of state, like mine, most of the year. For the most part, this is a pretty smooth routine. Sometimes it's out of whack, but we get through it.
I see the word "allowance" popping up, on and off, in some replies. An allowance is something that should be earned for doing something extra, not every day chores. These are Life Skills that will be used over and over.
As a mom, with a kid who was in Title 1 and had a state program coming to my home to help teach my 7 year old, where I was stuck; you don't pay them for doing every day chores.
As a sister of someone who went to the Arizona State School for the Deaf and Blind, in Tucson, students there are taught these same skills and the parents are told, not to pay their children but reward them with other things.
I don't see Life Skills as something my children should be paid an allowance for doing.
So what we've done is made a list of Life Skills vs Something Extra. If they stick to their chores and do well every week, we go to the park or somewhere outside of the home. If they do Something Extra, then, they are given money for doing it. They get half of the decision as to, what to do with the money. Usually it's half to the bank, and the other half stays in my room, to save up for things they want.
Anyways, I think you get the idea. Any age you can get them to do even the tiniest thing, is great. And make a game out of it ~ is a great idea. Laundary Basketing is the 1 that does well here, getting dirty clothes where they need to be. :)

Kelly - posted on 09/24/2011

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My son will be 4 in April, and I have him pick up his toys (which he has been doing since he was 2!!) and now slowly trying to teach him how to make his bed and he gathers all the garbage cans in the house and dumps into the big can in the kitchen, as well he picks up the laundry all over the house and helps me do the laundry. He also puts his own dishes (and sometimes even mine and everyone else's!!!) in the sink and i taught him that when he was 1 1/2 years old..... he gets $2.00 a week or at the end of the month, he gets a $15.00 dollar toy of his choice. Also, he gets stickers to put on his chore chart himself and he gets a treat of some sort, whether thats a cookie, a peice of chocolate or even deciding on what we have for dinner that night!

Start off with something simple and easy, like picking up her toys, cleaning her room or even helping you dry dishes. She's old enough to at least dry dishes.

Jessica - posted on 09/21/2011

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If your just starting out i would try to do a sticker chart write down 2 or 3 things to do each day for a week like give the dog or cat water, put dirty towels in laundry room,and wipe off kitchen table after dinner. if she does this reward her by putting a sticker on the chart, then later when you feel shes ready, start with 50 cents for each chore completed. thats kinda how i did it and now i rarely have to ask her to do these things :)

Candi - posted on 09/21/2011

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Your kids get an allowance every week. Do you make them work to earn their allowance? What are the advantages of creating “jobs” (chores) for your kids in exchange for earning their allowance?

1. Your kids will learn the value of a dollar. It’s easy for kids (and adults) to go through money like crazy when they’re spending money that isn’t their own. When kids have to work for their money, and they realize how much time and effort it takes to generate a given amount of money, they usually make more conservative spending choices.
2. Your kids will learn to budget their money. Assuming that you don’t grant your kids loans every time they run out of money, your kids will learn to conserve their money for the expenses that they can anticipate.
3. Your kids will learn accountability. When work is performed unsatisfactorily (or not performed at all), you can deduct a proportionate amount from their allowance for the week in which the work was under-performed or not performed. Kids then learn that, in order to get the money that they want or need, they must perform their work satisfactorily. (NOTE: when holding your kids accountable, always communicate with your kids about what your expectations are, what their performance was, what the gap was between expectations and performance, and why it’s important to the family to perform to expectations.)
4. Your kids will learn to have a work ethic. By learning that the family depends on them to get certain chores done, and by experiencing accountability when chores do not get done, kids will generally learn the importance of work ethic.
All four of the advantages above are life lessons: lessons that will benefit kids into their adulthood. In sum, making kids work for their allowance is a good way to create responsible, productive adults.

Jimena - posted on 09/16/2011

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My daughter start with very small chores by the age of 3. i had her helping with the laundry! She help me putting it into the washer machine... by know (she is 5), she keeps her room clean, she does her bed (almost), she does her laundry (with me by her side), she clean de mirrors in the house and dust. She do not have any allowance and she do not have a reward system for chores. I do explain her many times that chores are something we do to keep our house beautiful and that she is helping the family. That is her "reward". She understand it and is very helpful... I only use rewards with school behavior and when she helps with her little brother.

Leeann - posted on 09/16/2011

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My 11 yrs cleans her room, most of the time lol. she also does her won laundry, puts them in the washer, put the soap in and starts it. she also puts it in the dryer and folds her own laundry. she helps me get food to her and her brothers.

my 7 yrs old cleans up his room, again mostly. puts dirty clothes in the bathroom. he takes his dirty dishes cleans it off, and puts it in the sink.

my 4 yrs helps me wash dishes, throws away his trash and cleans up his toys. maybe i can get him to help his brother clean their room. but not usually o_O

we don't pay for chores, theres no reason for it. these are jobs that they are supposed to do. as my momma said we didnt get paid for things we were supposed to do.

Katie - posted on 09/12/2011

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I have three kids - 5, 3, and 17 months.
My 1 year old throws her own diapers away after I change her and cleans up her blocks and books when she's done playing with them. She gets a "yay!!!", a couple claps, and a high five.

My 3 year-old puts his dishes on the counter when he's done with dinner, and puts his own laundry away. (I'll give him his socks and underwear first, and shirts and shorts when he's done putting those where they go.) Still no allowance - these are things he's happy to help with, and knows I am proud of him for being a big helper. He gets a "good job buddy!" and a hug.

My 5 year-old knows how to clear her dinner plate off into the trash and put her dishes in the dishwasher. She also puts her laundry away, and does her best at sweeping the floor! It usually (as in always) needs another round of sweeping done afterwards, but she's practicing and learning what it takes to take care of a house. Occasionally she'll get a coin to put in her gumball machine when she's done helping! ...And of course, a thank you and a kiss.

We don't get paid to put toys away when we're done playing with them, to make or clean up after dinner, or to fold and put away laundry. Those are all things that we made the mess ourselves, we need to clean them up ourselves. It's just teaching responsibility, not teaching them that they need a reward for doing what needs to be done anyway.

I think if he wants to earn a little money for a special toy or something maybe he can clean out the dishwasher, take out the trash, or vacuum a room in the house. Those are things that are bigger and still need to be done, but were not necessarily needed to be done just because of him.

Michelle - posted on 09/11/2011

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well my daughter is 13 now, but when she was that age, i just had her keep her room clean, pick up any toys that she plays with. as for a reward i took her to like jokers, chuck e cheese,sometimes to mcdonalds for a happy meal.......i hope this helps :)

Rachel - posted on 09/10/2011

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i forgot to add, other chores he can do know (he's 9) is , vaccuming, loading or unloading the dishwasher, dusting, and putting away his own laundry

Rachel - posted on 09/10/2011

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I think its super important for a kid her age to have one chore she's responsible for 100% (to start with add other chores later) when my oldest was 7 he was in charge of the recycling, only he did it, we never touched it so if it got done it was only him doing it. If he puts it off for a day then there's twice as much the next day so he learned the concept of keeping up on his chores so its not harder later. After he got that down thats his chore he still dose for free but we add 3 more chores a week at 25 cents a pop and an extra 75 cents if he's good all week. (no time outs or video games being takeing away ect)

Terri - posted on 09/04/2011

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one dollar a week for each year old they are. you should also have her set aside 10 percent for charity, 40 percent for savings and 50 percent for things she wants. It's a great way to teach them about money and will be very helpful for them as adults. As they get older they can start paying fir things like clothes and lunches

Suzanne - posted on 09/02/2011

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We had our son start at 7 and his chore is to take the trash to the can and keep his room clean. If he does this on a weekly basis he gets 5 dollars to spend.

Suzanne - posted on 09/02/2011

3

16

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We had our son start at 7 and his chore is to take the trash to the can and keep his room clean. If he does this on a weekly basis he gets 5 dollars to spend.

Valerie - posted on 09/01/2011

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That depends on the parent. My son is 7 years old and his chores are to water and feed the dogs and to take out the trash. He gets one dollar a week for each. Being I am 9 months pregnant if he helps me do things around the house then he will get another dollar. I do not pay my son to pick up his own messes. Personally I feel that is retarded to do and is something a child would milk to death if they were given the chance. Each parent is different with what they expect from their child. I know by the time I was 8 I was cooking things like grilled cheese, eggs, macaroni and cheese, ramen noodles, and working the oven as well as doing laundry and dishes. This was only because I had a very lazy and demanding step mother so I was forced to grow up faster than most children. My son constantly tries to get us to pay him more money than a dollar for each time because his cousins get $10.00 a week for what they do. We tell him that the reason he only gets $1.00 for each thing he does for the whole week is because we want him to learn that just because you are doing something does not mean you are going to bet paid a lot of money for it. We make him save his money too. He is allowed to spend it if he wants to but we are trying to teach him that patience and saving money is better than spending it right away.

Alysha - posted on 08/31/2011

5

28

0

Our son is six and he has been helping out around the house since he was big enough to pick up a toy and put it in the toy bin! Right now he takes turn with his sister drying dishes after supper, he takes the trash cans out to the curb and brings them back to the garage the next morning, he makes his bed every morning, he puts his own clothes away, he helps fold towels and put them away, and he is to find one way to be a helper everyday. He gets $2 a week $1 goes in savings the other goes in his wallet. He also always cleans up any toys or items he gets out and he loves helping his dad with outside chores like picking up sticks, watering flowers, holding the ladder steady, etc. Both of our children help set the table every night and the also do their homework.

Dawn - posted on 08/30/2011

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She should be responsible for cleaning her room, helping to keep the bathroom she uses clean, put her clothes away and at least rinse her dishes. Oh and to keep her room clean. As far as how much you should give her a lot of it depends on your income, what you can afford and an amount you think is fair for the amount of work she is doing.

Starfish - posted on 08/26/2011

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12

My daughter has had age-appropriate chores since she could understand simple commands. I absolutely believe it is the responsibility of the entire family to pitch in and do their part for a smooth-running home. My daughter is 6 now, and she can dust, vacuum, wash dishes, load/unload the dishwasher, take care of the animals, sort laundry, fold clothes, put away clothes, and just clean up in general. If they're mentally capable of understanding what's being asked of them, and physically capable of doing it, then they should have chores.

As for allowance, I don't pay my daughter to do her family responsibilities. They're not negotiable. She may lose privileges if she refuses, but I'm not going to pay her to be the contributing member of the family she should be.

However, if she does something outside of her normal duties, then she may be rewarded with a dollar or two for helping out, depending on what it was, and how long she helped for. We negotiate that sort of thing, because I'm asking a special favour, and I want her to feel it's a fair trade.

Julia - posted on 08/26/2011

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My little girl is nearly two (two more weeks) and aside from picking up her toys (with Mommy and Daddy's help) when its time to clean up to go to bed/daycare/change activity, she also helps in a variety of other ways. She puts the utensils on the table for each meal and puts her plate and cup at her place (since they aren't breakable). They don't end up in the "right" places, but they are there and she loves to help. We have her helping to make certain meals - she'll "stir" the eggs when we make french toast, she scoops the coffee beans into the pot... these are mostly because she loves to help and wants to be involved.

When we are doing a clean up around the house, she holds the dust pan so that I can sweep the dirt, and she helps me carry it to the garbage. She'll "help" vaccuum (but holding onto the vacuum while I'm doing the carpets)

Kids are born with a desire to be helpfu, and its up to us to keep that spirit alive!! We want to get her involved now, while she is young and interested, so that it continues to be a natural progression. The older she gets, the more her helping out will change to include chores that she can do on her own. We don't think that we will ever associate an allowance to chores - we don't want her to think that she doesn't have to help if she doesn't accept the money, or that she is being paid to be a productive member of our family... we don't know how we'll deal with allowance. Right now, we just give her a bit of change now and then to put in her piggy bank. Any change she finds in the couch or on the floor, she can keep, too. LOL. but that will have to change so she doesn't go ransacking other peoples homes, looking for spare change. :)

There definately isn't a right or a wrong way to deal with chores and allowance - just get them helping to the best of their ability. In the begining it doesn't matter if the fork is 6 inches away from the plate, or if spots are missed during the vacuuming! ")

Erica - posted on 08/25/2011

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my daughter is 11 and has been doing chores since she was 3 I started the first couple of yrs making sure she was able to clean up her room.She has always been good about being neat. I rewarded her with family activities around 5 she started the dishes and organizing the laundry. She then got to choose the weekly family activity on family night. when she reached about 7 my daughter continued the picking up after herself laundry and dishes add the trash to her chores and now our little girl gets about 10 dollars a week for chores. As far as the responsibility goes make sure that you are allowing her to make decisions she is able to make at the age of seven like what should she eat and when would be a good time to do her chores. My husband and I also pay our daughter for doing well in school and completing all of her homework assignments on time we have our jobs they have theirs lols. good luck and i hope you have fun teaching and watching her learn it is really a great experience god bless

Melanie - posted on 08/20/2011

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I have 4 kids: 15 (boy), 11 (boy), 5 (girl), and 22 months (boy). My 15 year old does the litterbox, mows, gets a choice of vacuuming or cleaning the bathroom when it's a cleaning day, and keeps his room clean. My 11-year old take the garbage out, cleans his room, and washes any dishes that aren't dishwasher safe. My 5-year old has been helping me sort laundry since she was 3. She also cleans her room and helps me pick up the baby's toys at night. They all bring their laundry baskets down on laundry day, put away their clean clothes, and put their dishes in the dishwasher. They also help with any random things I might ask of them throughout the week.
I do not pay an allowance. These things are all part of being a family. No one pays me for doing the laundry or cooking! When my oldest son wants money he mows lawns for neighbors, rakes lawns, or shovels snow.

Lori - posted on 08/17/2011

5

21

0

My daughter will be 5 in October. She has been doing chores since she was a year and a half. Started by picking up her toys, clothes and any trash she might have throw down. She was putting her folded clothes away at age 2 and still doing the other chores. By 3 she would use my little automatic broom on the hardwood floors. She now also helps wipe down the table, dust, feed and water her dogs. Helps put stuff in the recycling bin (shes better then my husband at it..LOL) She brings her basket (which also has her sister clothes in it. Sister just turned 3) to the laundry room when its full. My older daughter is alot more helpfull cause we started so young with her. My younger daughter gives me a hard time cause she didnt develop as fast as my oldest so we started alittle later with her. My oldest will start getting allowance when she turnes 5. And it will be a dollar for every year she is. They also have bank account so they can choose to put there money in their account or spend it when they get money. Every year we put a $100 in it at tax time. So they will have money to buy a car when they turn 16 and we will match whatever amout they want to spend on a car. Kids need gaudiance and to be taught responsiblity.

Sara Sue - posted on 08/16/2011

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My son is 7 1/2 and he gets a dollar each day if he: reads for 30 minutes, feeds and waters the dogs, and walks the dogs. He is VERY excited about earning $7 each week so that he can pay for his own stuff!

Nichola - posted on 08/14/2011

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reward system until you become the bank, then make them work for the money. stickers are great at the moment for miss 5 year old. she gets so many stickers a week then she gets a treat, ie, extra ride at pony club or a late night up with us and a teddy bear picnic and dvd... miss 5 year old is expected to open and shut her curtains, make her bed, get herself ready in morning and before bed without being nagged (including breakfast), unload dish washer and feed animals, and get her school things ready. you need to be consistant and encourage the behavior

Susan - posted on 08/12/2011

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I would start simple, something like help set the dinner table and then clear it when dinner is over. If you have pets she can help feed or groom that is a great way to teach your daughter responsibility. I offer my 8 year old one-on-one game time (board games & video) or I'll read him a couple of chapters from one of his favorite books. I also give him lots of praise for helping out and explain to him how much the family benefits from his efforts.

Jennifer - posted on 08/03/2011

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i have kids with adhd. I do have them do things i no they can finsh. travis is better at dishes, nick is better at cleaning living room. i keep things simple they like to mow they take turns mowing they are 13 and 14. now my daugther is 8 im lucky to get her clean her room

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