What did you use to teach your children to read?

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My 5 year old Step-Daughter is having trouble reading. It's not because she's slow or mentally challenged! My Husband and I only get visitation with her and, when she's at moms house no one takes the time to sit with her and show her how to do it or works with her. When my husband and I try and work with her at our house she figits, is easily fustrated and, wants to quit after a few words, She is also facing summer school and she's not even in kindergarten. If you could suggest methods, books, tapes or, games I would appericiate it. Thank you very much for your input.

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i cant suggest how to teach her, but - forcing her to read my backfire on you... she may grow up to hate reading. my son is 6 and reads at a 3rd graders level according to the Lexile test - and all we did with him, was sat down, cuddled up on the couch, and read to him, but eventually we got to the point where we would point to words in a really familiar story and get him used to seeing the words. in kindergarten they start by using site words,... I, am, we, the, be, for, and, but .... then after they master those, they start learning how to combine site words with other sounds to form longer words.. its frustrating, but, one teacher told us that for most kids it doesnt "click" til they are half way through kindergarten... just keep reading to her, and make reading fun so she wants to learn =)

Karen - posted on 06/22/2010

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I am a teacher, and really, her mom is doing her a huge disservice by not reading with her. You don't need to teach her as you read together...just READ together! Make it a special time, cuddle up on the couch like someone else said. She needs to see the pleasure in hearing a story, talking about the story, giggling with you at a story. What some people said about turning her off to reading can be so true. Don't cram it down her throat. She IS only 5. Many kindergarteners come in not reading, but it breaks my heart when they come in not having been read TO. Take her to the library, have her pick out books she wants to hear read to her. As you're reading ask her things like what she thinks will happen next or if she's ever had something like that happen to her (just by talking you're getting at important comprehension strategies without it seeming like teaching). When the story is done ask her what her favorite part of the story was. After she's heard a story a few times (and yes, read the same ones over and over!), let her "read" the story to you (she doesn't even have to read the words yet, just telling the story as she remembers it and uses picture clues to remember)...But again, don't push it. Make reading enjoyable. It might also help for her to see you reading and enjoying it.

LaSondra - posted on 06/24/2010

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The love of reading is modeled and acquired, not forced. I am a reading teacher, and my most avid readers are those that enjoy it, not those that were forced. Children learn to read until grade two, and after that, they read to learn. Allow her to go through the process. Make reading and learning fun. Set the atmosphere: choose many books from various genres, read everyday materials - menus, newspapers,signs etc., talk about books and current events at the table, and finally, take her on field trips and then find books or magazines that tie into the items that piqued her interest. Before you know it, she'll be asking you to read!

Sylvia - posted on 06/20/2010

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Really, she's 5 and her school are upset because she's not reading yet?!?! Poor kid :(

You know, some kids teach themselves to read at age 3 or 4, and others don't figure it out until closer to 7 ... but by the time they're 9 or so, it all evens out. There's no real advantage to be gained from trying to teach kids to read before they're ready -- it's like trying to teach them to walk before they're ready, just an exercise in frustration for everyone.

What the research says is that kids whose parents read to them and who see their parents reading, kids who have lots of books in the house and see that their parents value reading, do better at reading themselves. So if you're concerned, I have to say that's what I'd suggest. I know you aren't parenting her full time, which makes it harder -- but if you can, try to make reading a leisure activity, not a chore or a battle. Don't "work with her"; offer to read to her, whatever she wants you to read even if it's something that makes you roll your eyes ;^), and gradually get her to start taking a turn at reading -- just a few words at a time to start with. Look for fun picture books with some repeated phrases that she can start to recognize. Point out interesting words out in the world: on bus marquees, on street signs, on storefronts ...

Frankly, at this young age I think the most important thing is not to turn kids off reading. Unless there's a learning disability of some kind, kids who love reading get better at it all on their own once they've got the basics. My DD (who is 7 and finishing Grade 2 in a couple of weeks) still has trouble with some longer words, still mispronounces a lot of words (she read "heirloom" as "her-lum" earlier today, for instance), but she reads all. the. time. -- and I can see her getting better, not because anyone is working with her on it but because, well, practice makes ... better. My little brother had a lot of trouble in school because of his, ahem, unusual attitude toward authority figures and busywork -- but he read himself The Lord of the Rings when he was 8, just because he wanted to. Our family is full of enthusiastic readers, because all of us grew up almost literally surrounded by books and reading. So if you want your stepdaughter to become a better reader, probably the best thing you can do is show her how much fun it is, so she'll want to learn to do it herself :)

Joy - posted on 07/01/2010

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Yes, this response is right on! Read to her. It should be a positive experience with snuggling. She will eventually catch on. I am a teacher, parent, and certified parent coach. Five is far too young to be worried about her ability to read. My daughter did not read when she was five. Now she is a straight A student in high school.

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Alyssa - posted on 06/09/2014

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I used a visual read along. It was an animated story that let the kids follow along with the animation while reading along with the words at the bottom. The animations were cute and they could play the animation and keep themselves occupied while I made food or did something for myself.

Kelly - posted on 02/05/2014

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My son just turned 6 and is in kindergarten. Within the past few months he has had difficulty finishing his class assignments and lots of trouble focusing. His teacher said "he is in another world and cannot stay on task". I am concerned he will fall behind and also wonder if I need to take additional steps to see what's going on. I am very worried. Any advice??

Nicole - posted on 02/04/2013

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Melissa: My husband and I started with Hooked on Phonics and it worked for my older daughter, but my second daughter didn't really catch on so we found an awesome book: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 easy lessons. You can get the ebook version online for free: http://www.ebook3000.com/Teach-your-chil...
We had also tried with some success Your Baby Can REad. Hope this helps. Just be persistent and patient.

Melissa - posted on 02/04/2013

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I used Hooked on Phonics for my daughter who is now in Kinder. Started her at age four and it was amazing. We used the Pre K first, the she advanced to the Kindergarten level, we also bought grades 1st and 2nd for use during the summer ! My 19 month old is on the Pre K level, and she is memorizing her letters and the sounds outstandingly. She is halfway through the program already! Good luck! Try it out if you can..:)

Brandy - posted on 08/19/2012

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Let her pick out the book then you read it to her, then you can start off with having her read a sentence then you read one, back again then as time goes try adding sentences, make up different voices for characters, this worked for my daughter, trying going online for her age you can usually find site words for her age group and make a game out of it, you can do a memory game out of most words like the word sit then on another card a picture of someone sitting etc it's rough at that age cause it's words they use so we think automatically they should be able to read them

Heidi - posted on 08/17/2012

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My son loves the videos "Meet the Sight Words" there are 3 of them. Here in Colorado I can check them out from the library. These movies show the word, then make it into a character then turn it back to the word. I baby sit, and have found them to keep the interest of 2-8 year olds, with the kids racing to yell out the word before the movie says it. Videos are easy, even busy mom's can sit a child in front of a movie. There are even books that go with the movie. You can watch a small part on youtube.

Jennifer - posted on 04/26/2012

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try www.FirstStepReading.com Its FREE. It has instructional videos for kids. They are animated and go step by step. You can also ask the Author for help and she emails you back for free. I followed her advice of using a white board and magnet letters to help my son learn to put sounds together and read words. The videos also teach how to put sounds together and Sight Words. It is a great resource bc it taught me as well as my child the steps for reading.

Kanthony - posted on 08/16/2011

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What I used for both of my children was Headsprout reading. The website is www.headsprout.com.

Chrisna - posted on 08/15/2011

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Does she like it when you read children stories? Old time favourites like Cindarella? I read them over and over and over (hehehehe). The moment they are hooked on stories, I child want's to know more about reading, the letters, etc.

Heather - posted on 08/14/2011

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I used LEM phonics books. These taught my boys ALL the sounds that a letter can make right from the start e.g. a says a in mate, a in apple and o sound in was. They learnt to read so fast it was almost frightening.

Renee - posted on 08/10/2011

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I just read one point someone made that is quite significant. Why are we concerned with how well she can read at 5? Until she is in grade 1, I wouldn't be doing anymore than helping her to recognise the alphabet. You may instill bad habits that are difficult to break later. School teach our children to read very differently to the way we do. They go to school to learn how to read for a reason. By all means its important to read WITH (not at) our children daily, but at this stage I don't think you have much to worry about. My son is the youngest in his class and one of the best readers in it. At the age of 5 he was only just learning to recognise letters and and his name. I really wouldn't worry too much.

Anne - posted on 08/10/2011

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If she is not in Kindergarten yet, then she doesn't have to be able to read yet. My daughter learned how to sound out words in Kindergarten but didn't really learn how to read sentences until 1st grade. She just finished 1st grade. She is reading pretty fluently now. We read tag team style. I read 3 paragraphs and then she reads one. She likes that. Or I read and she reads the stuff in quotations marks. ;)

Leena - posted on 08/10/2011

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Hi Amber. My suggestion would be to first read out stories to her from a book before she sleeps. Secondly, gift her a few books with attractive pictures, colours, sketches, stories in bold fonts, etc...... Encourage her to start stacking her collection of books and let her name and maintain her own library....encourage her to show her friends her library and she can pick a book and read it alongwith her friend....dont get worried if all this takes a while to show results.....just keep putting in your efforts as a mom, and spending quality time (whatever time u can) with your child is most important.

Renee - posted on 08/09/2011

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I highly recommend the Tag reading system. It gives children the independence to read on their own and they don't even realise that they are learning. Also, make sure you are not reading AT them. Involve your child in the story by asking questions about the pictures and what they think will happen next. Use props to act out scenes and ask the child to turn the pages.Try to read to them after physical activity or at the end of the day. A child with energy to burn is not going to sit still for any period of time. That one I'm an EXPERT on! Anyway, I hope that helps and best of luck to you.

Pamela - posted on 08/09/2011

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not saying this is the same for everyone but my mom made me read all the time and i HATE reading now. i get into a book and im sleeping a page into it. My son i read to every night. Dr suess was to short to put me to sleep, lol. anyhow when he was 3 i had him repeat some of the important words then at 6 he would read a book to me and i would read one to him. hes not currently a fan of reading but he can read pretty well.

Susy - posted on 08/06/2011

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Tell her she only has to read the words "the", "a", "and", "to"....then read to her and have her follow along with the words and read her own assigned words when they happen in the book!

Chazmine - posted on 08/05/2011

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you could buy her the tag reading system that way she can work on some book and words by herself at moms and you can check onlne to see her progress and possibly know what to help her with when she comes over to visit you can also try cite words and make it a game or turn the words she pratices into sentences and add pics then cimbine them into a book you can read together and let her pick out the words she knows we did this with my son last year he is now five we plan to keep doing this because we have much progress you can also take the cite words and test her and then let her test you they find that fun sometimes jsut turn it into a game this is something that isnt costly but effective good luck

SiewYean - posted on 10/15/2010

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I suggest you may want to start with some nursery rhymes. You can act, play and dance with nursery rhymes. Here is a suggestion what I did with my kids http://www.kids-activities-learning-game...
You can also try out some of the reading activities in http://www.kids-activities-learning-game...
Make the reading time fun, enjoyable and a good experience for her. It takes time, be patient. Do not force her or it may backfire.

Amy - posted on 10/14/2010

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Amber, I know you posted this a LONG time ago. I hope you get this. I haven't taken the time to read other responses, but the simplest and easiest way to teach a child anything is what I call "opportunistic teaching". If she doesn't know letters and letter sounds, use letter puzzles. As she finds the pieces and puts them in, say the letters and the sounds to her. Make funny faces or funny sounds when you say the letter sounds. (i.e.: for 'r' make a pirate sound, for short 'i', make it sound like you've just tasted something gross, for 'p', put a tissue in front of your mouth so it blows out when you say the sound, etc.) When you are out and about point out words and letters and have her tell you what they are and the sound they make, etc. Like if you're at the mall, have her tell you the names of stores. If it's a simple one that she can sound out, great! If it's one that she already knows simply because she's been there a lot or whatever, still congratulate her and call her 'your little reader'. It will make her feel proud and give her confidence. That's probably all she need to get her interested in learning more! In other words, make it a game. There are also many reading games that you can easily find on the internet. Lastly, I am a tutor and know that I could help her. So, you might look up a good tutor in your area. I, honestly haven't had much luck with getting the word out about myself and my business thru the schools, so look for fliers at local businesses and on the internet. Good luck! She'll get there! :)

Lisa - posted on 08/17/2010

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Now I actually did buy my 3 a toy robot that had programs to insert, like elem reading, word recognition, just simple questions they had to answer multiple choice. There was also a "toy" computer that had several programs of all grade levels that "grew" with them, at least to middle school.
Always remember, YOU ARE your Child's First Teacher. The Public school teachers are there to HELP you , not to do the Primary Job of teaching Love and sound Principals. Do whatever you do in Love, And it's nearly impossible to go wrong. Keep up the Great work!! ~ Lisa aka: DrMomcEO

Amber - posted on 07/25/2010

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My daughter was reading by about 3 years old, it was only books like Dr. Seuss, which, I'm sure she memorized more than she was reading, but they say that's usually the first step. She's now 5, but when her dad and I divorced, she backtracked and is basically having to learn all over again. I've tried sitting down with her and reading her books and trying to get her to participate, and I know her dad works with her during bedtime stories. My little sister that I live with, has a bf that brings home ALL sorts of books for her every other weekend as well, but she, like yours, gets easily frustrated, etc. So far, the best way I've seen to get her to read, is by allowing her to type on my computer. I figure, I help her spell out a word, and she finds the appropriate letters to push, and as she watches them appear on the screen, maybe it'll help her to associate them with everything else as we go. I would use flash cards, but I have a hard time learning with them, and I know it'd frustrate her just as much as pointing the words out in a book to her. One thing I've though about doing, are posting flashcards on objects with the name of the object on it. Like, a card on the oven that reads "oven" and see if that would help her pick up on it faster too. But with 3 dogs, and 5 other people living here, I don't see them lasting long, even just for a weekend.

Lisa - posted on 07/25/2010

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Hey Amber! my 3 boys are now grown. However, when i realized that the magnet school they were in, even they had the best teachers and the best technology in the county, they were cutting back on phonics when the inclusion curriculum was put in place. I went to work seeking out resources for educational material. There is a county depot where all the used equipment goes. There I found books on all grade levels, readers, history etc. I began reading thingto them; stories in the afternoons, and telling them history lessons about our great country as it was founded.
Then I also found online a set of books that my 5th grade teacher had read to us as an afternoon treat, Thie series is 'The Sugar Creek Gang'. I found it in paperback. All about kids and their adventures, back in the day. All good clean reading, no monsters, demons, witches or anything of the sort. Each chapter leavs the reader (or listener) clammoring for more!!
As a Para-professional and Parent Educator in Kindergarten, Pre-K and ESE Pre-K, I realized All Kids, not just mine, loved the time spent reading to them. Just having them loving to hear stories makes the love of reading engrained in them. When they want to learn-they do. They NEED to Motivated by Love. When they see you care enough to take the time to share Time with them, They seem to come along in their own time. one of Mine was a late bloomer. The teachers kept harping on me to have him diagnosed, evaluated etc, etc. I refused to have my child labeled. He now is a specialized mechanic on the U-2 Recon plane in the U.S. Air Force.
Just love you kids. They are NOT all alike. They will not all develop alike. Each one is on their own Developemental Time line. God did not make a single one of us alike because we all have a very special and unique purpose in life and no one can take the place of a single one!! Good Luck!! ~Lisa aka DrmomCEO

Cynthia - posted on 07/06/2010

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I'm not a big reader either, but just take the time with her and it will all work out in the end!

Try getting phoicnes books, do up shapes, objects, ABC on card. My daugther has just learned her abc, objects, writinng her name (left handed) - backwards at first but know can do it. Threw setting down and helping her, and taking time with her. She is only 4 yr old.

Cindy

Sandra - posted on 07/06/2010

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Every child has the right to read. It's an enjoyable experience where can shut themselves out for a few minutes and go into a fun-filled fantasy. Your step-daughter should be enjoying many stories. If you're concerned about her reading ability then contact her school and if they're doing their job, then they should contact her guardians and design a reading programme for her. If left too late, then your step daughter will fall behind and everything will seem a struggle. Reading is ESSENTIAL for every subject because if she can't read confidently then she can't do homework etc and it spirals into all aspects of every day life. There's nothing more precious than to sit a child on your lap and read beautiful funny stories together before bedtime, it helps to bond and it relaxes them. Good luck and I hope that tbis has helped x

Amanda - posted on 07/05/2010

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try googling Funnix Reading program. this is the BEST reading program in the world and ALL children will learn to read, my son sam it has changed his life, look and read through their website and read all of the research behind the program and best of all it is only US$250 and all your kids can use it, good luck

Mayura - posted on 07/05/2010

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Hi Amber,

I used the book "Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons" by Siegfried Engelmann. Just takes about 20 minutes a day, so there's no question of getting frustrated, but only do it when she is active, don't force her. This book is really magic. Now my daughter is 7-year-old, and she can easily crack big spellings too.

Good luck, just be patient, and enjoy the activity with her.

Regards,
Mayura

Diana - posted on 07/05/2010

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I used Hooked on Phonics with my son along with Reader Rabbit and other computer games. He is now going into 3rd grad and reading on at least a 5th grade level. My daughter did not like the repetition of Hooked on Phonics but loved the Leap Frog phonics desk as well as computer games. She is 5 and a half, getting ready to start kindergarten and is reading simple books. Once kids learn the sounds that each letter makes I tell them to make the sounds when they're reading. Usually if they get stuck on a word but start making the sounds of the first couple of letters they can use the pictures to help figure out the words. Some of the kids coming out of kindergarten aren't even at the level that my kids were going into kindergarten so I wouldn't worry about it too much yet. Get simple books to read and point to each word as you read and stretch the words out by making each individual sound.

Trudy - posted on 07/05/2010

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My son LOVED Starfall.com. It is an excellent web site that teaches letters, sounds, phonics and beginning reading, through games and fun activities. However, he had a natural fascination with letters and numbers from the time he was 2 and practically taught himself to read. Each child is ready at a different age. 5 is too young for many children. I have 4 kids. 2 of them were not ready to really read until 7 and even then it was not easy. Like others have said, read books to her which will help her develop a love of books, but don't push it or force her to read yet.

Sara - posted on 07/03/2010

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I am using a series called Bob Books rec by her teacher. We are reading them everyday and slowly she is starting to read. I would rec them!

Melanie - posted on 07/03/2010

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There are many good ideas on here and many good programs out there, but please remember that there is not one magic fix for reading. It is a skill that has to be individualized according to the student. FIRST, it must be fun! While it's sad that she has not already been read to, it's not too late. Read to her. That is the single most important thing to do at this point. Then, just make sure to talk about what you are reading. In simple books, you can even stop and see if she knows what comes next (word or event). Let it be natural and relaxed. She is NOT ready for drills if she doesn't see reading as a fun activity. Poems, songs, fingerplays, etc. are all still very age appropriate. You can even do silly stuff like singing the alphabet song incorrectly or out of order. Let her correct you. She'll think it's funny that you messed up! As she becomes more comfortable, you can introduce more of the "skills" mentioned by so many on here. The key is to make it fun. Games (computer or otherwise) go a lot further than sit down drills. If you use flash cards, make them into a game (matching while reading, Whack the word, etc.).

As a reading teacher and a mom, I wish you the best. I hope reading will become a fun-filled family time for you all.

Susy - posted on 07/03/2010

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My son is the same way---he totally fights reading---I made up normal flash cards and my son wasn't real excited about them, but then I found an iphone app called dolch flash cards http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dolch-fla...
---he liked it because it was interactive and he could check his answers with the recorded voice--plus it was fun to play with mommy's phone---after struggling to get him to learn all the "dolch sight words" for kinder and first grade, he picked them up in a week of practicing with my iphone. Hope this helps. Good luck!

Jennifer - posted on 07/03/2010

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As a teacher of students with specials needs and a mom of 2 this is very near and dear to my heart. I recommend books with repeating passages, IE Green Eggs and Ham. This repeating pattern and even books with predictable text will help. Also remember she is only 4. Limit the time you soend on "teaching" to about 4 minutes. That is the amount of time she can probably focus.

Make it a game. This way she doesn't realize she is learning while she plays.

Don't panic yet. She will get it in her own time.

Barbilee - posted on 07/03/2010

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First, I have to say 5??!!! She isn't even in kindergarten??? My goodness, let her be little.
But if you must, there is only one way to truly teach kids to read....time and repetition. Find something SHE likes. Not books that you think she should read or that her school thinks she should read. What does she love? Go to the library, ask the librarian for picture/word books on the topics that she loves. When children are inspired they will do anything and they will do it for a long time. Have you ever seen a child sit and play with dolls/ lego/ a video game for an hour or more without any "help" from you? Kids want to be kids. Let them. Find her interest and build on that. SUMMER SCHOOL???? for a 5 year old? What is that all about? Relax, let her be 5. There is no rush. She will get it when she is ready. The more you push today they more she struggles and the more she hates it. Give her the wholistic approach to learning, it will be the best give you have ever given her.

Barbilee H. B.A.:.B.Ed.
Family Success Coach
*retired special needs teacher

[deleted account]

I started with flash cards, and alphabet puzzles. Then I would constantly read to them. I think the more you read to them 1 - The more interested they will be in reading 2- It will help them with word recognition. Start with books that don't have too many words because the attention span of children is minimal. Also be sure to ask questions while you're reading to help them understand the big picture or overall concept.

Have fun and good luck!

Sharon - posted on 07/03/2010

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Don't worry. Some children are able to read fast n some don't. Your step daughter is frustrated because you are asking her to read when she can't read. Why don't you ask her to choose a book that she likes and you read it for her. Do this till she is comfortable and confident to read. When she gets to kindergarten she will be taught phonics. This will help her too.

Karen - posted on 07/02/2010

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You got so much helpful advice. I wanted to add one more little piece. Turn the sound down on the T.V. and turn on the captioning. I don't know of a kid alive that doesn't have a favorite movie of some kind. Seeing the words that go along with it will catch her eye. It is like having someone read to you. But like so many other moms have told you. The absolute best thing that you can do for her is to read to her. Let her pick the book and read. You may have to read the same book 100 times, but she will start to see that the print goes along with what you are saying.
You are blessed with her in your life and as she grows, you will have plenty of battles. Hopefully this won't have to be one of them for ya'll.

Diane - posted on 07/02/2010

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Cereal boxes were the first. I taught letters in the grocery store. And a lullaby tape with abc's and sounds for them to go to sleep with. By Discovery Toys, apple apple, a a a, etc.. Plus regular books every day. There are simple early readers that she can sound out once she learns the letters. But she's not behind yet, reading comes along by age 6 or first grade.

Aimi - posted on 07/02/2010

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I like the McGuffey Readers I also like the Gordon readers but they are really hard to find . Copyright is 1910. But they're wonderful. Reading every night to your child is a wonderful time to bond and have fun. They learn to love to read that way. My step sons have had such a hard time since we got them but my husband has been reading for about a year to them and now the light has come on and their favorite place is the library now and what new book they can read this week.

Rachel - posted on 07/02/2010

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I think the more creative you are, the better- while you're waiting in line somewhere, play the game of "how many words can we think of that start with the letter 'b,'" and make sure to take turns but give her time to think of her turn so she doesn't feel too pressured. Another great pre-reading game is coming up with words that rhyme with, say, "ball" or "door," or you think of one. Knowing the parts of a word and the sounds that make a word up (phonics) helps to make sense of the letters a child sees in print. Pointing to words as you're reading them helps a child understand the direction the words are read in, and also makes it clear to a child that the words represent ideas. So, I agree that reading to your daughter, and making it a fun and normal part of life will encourage her to want to learn how to read. Using reading for important things, and including her in the process (like choosing a recipe for dinner, or following directions to a place she wants to go) can also give her a basis for the importance of knowing how to read.

Kristi - posted on 07/02/2010

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It didn't sound like you were stressing, but just in case you were, remember there are people that have graduated from high school that can't read.... :)

Nancy - posted on 07/02/2010

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I read a few of the comments and I'm a little confused. My child started kindergarten at 5 and he DIDN'T know how to read but we read to him as much as we could. When he started grade 2 he was one of the highest of his class in reading but then he lost interest. It seemed the more he read the harder the books were getting and when you get a book on Monday along with your other lessons and everything has to be done by Thursday along with a book report....ya I can see him loosing interest. I can also understand why this child is frustrated and has no interest....SHE DOESN"T KNOW HOW TO READ, she hasn't been to kindergarten yet!!!! I wouldn't push her to read but read as much to her with books that are simple to begin with. You can buy series of books from Scholastic, check out the library, etc. I'd wait till after her kindergarten year and if she still hasn't mastered it then I'd be worried but till then read to her as much as you can. Just showing her or reading a book to her won't make her understand the concept of reading. Good Luck

Carla - posted on 07/02/2010

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We read Dr. Seuss, over and over, and over and over! The ABC book was one we went over in particular. My youngest is 37, and I can STILL recite almost all of the book!

Reading is contagious. If you read to her and let her understand how much fun it is, she will catch on. Take the pressure off her (and you) of making her read, and just read to her.

God bless, honey.

Allison - posted on 07/02/2010

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I used a mixture of flash cards and a reading scheme. The most important thing to do is start as early as possible and make reading a game. Young children do not know that they are learning - everthing is a game to them when they are young because they have no other frame of reference and they have yet to experience the formal learning of school.
When my daughter started school she had a reading age of an eight year old because she started young and enjoyed every minute. She was always way ahead of the other kids so school was never a chore and allowed her to develop other interests.
I set up http://www.earlyreadingskills.co.uk I have a video of her on there learning letters at 18th months

Amber - posted on 07/02/2010

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Amber~STOP STRESSING!!! :) I agree with everyone in that reading to your child is important, but lets give the kindergarten teacher some credit! Im sure (s)he will have your child on her way to reading in no time. Reading isn't everything! They all catch up with eachother for the most part by 3rd grade,regardless if they start reading by 7months or 7 years. Maybe focus on the things that the teacher doesn't work on so much, like manners and sharing. Is it just me or does it seem like people are getting really competitive about whos child can read first? CRAZY!
To me its more important that my little boy starts kindergarten this fall as a good listener and with a kind heart. Just relax girl :)
~Another Amber

Karen - posted on 07/02/2010

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try your baby can read it's a dvd with flash cards that teaches your child words and how to spell them.try it and see how it works.my daughter went kindergarten and had help from the dvd and she reads very well.

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