What did you use to teach your children to read?

[deleted account] ( 167 moms have responded )

My 5 year old Step-Daughter is having trouble reading. It's not because she's slow or mentally challenged! My Husband and I only get visitation with her and, when she's at moms house no one takes the time to sit with her and show her how to do it or works with her. When my husband and I try and work with her at our house she figits, is easily fustrated and, wants to quit after a few words, She is also facing summer school and she's not even in kindergarten. If you could suggest methods, books, tapes or, games I would appericiate it. Thank you very much for your input.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

167 Comments

View replies by

Mahrukh - posted on 06/21/2010

1

23

0

One of he easiest ways is to read along with her. you can cuddle up with her and read to her, make sure she looks at what you are reading to her. Once she likes it, she will read herself, if you make it like homework or a must do then she will end up hating it. The best course would be get her interested in it.

Michele - posted on 06/21/2010

1

15

0

The way I taught my son his letters and numbers were very simple. We are on the road alot. I had my son read the licence plates on the vehicles. After he learned the single numbers, I would have him read them to me as full numbers. EX. 598 he would read them to me as five hundered ninty-six. Its easy and simple.

Jennifer - posted on 06/21/2010

25

95

0

I homeschool, and we are using "The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading" (got it from amazon.com) and LOVE it! My 7 yr old is reading level 4 and above books, and my newly 5 yr old son is just starting to read now. My 3 yr old daughter is picking up on the letter sounds and shapes as well. I highly reccomend this excellent book!

Karen - posted on 06/20/2010

481

19

44

My kindergartener threw major temper tantrums and never wanted to do any of the work either. First of all you should be starting out with sight words like it, at, the, as...If you are into books already, let her pick a book about a bug she's asks about or bird, snake whatever. If that doesn't work you can find lots of games to play online/offline. www.starfall.com is an awesome site. It was the only thing my son wanted to do. You can click on the words and it shows you and tells you how to read the word. check it out. lots of cool stuff on there. Games and such that she can do almost without you. Don't push her too far. Try to find ways to encourage her. For instance "I know this word, this word, but this one I'm stuck on.", hang words up around the house and have her hop to one while saying it, run, skip, jump....I tried everything with my son and he ended up failing kindergarten. It wasn't until the middle-end of the year that I read that some kids just don't have the maturity to want to learn that stuff yet. It's overwhelming to them and they shut down. I stopped, let him slide for a while. All we did was his homework sheet that I helped him do. Then, by the end of the year I started to see his interest kick in. He was picking up books and reading the whole thing (with help from me), he was counting things all the time, asking me how to spell a word. He's being held back a yr. because he hasn't learned enough for 1st grade. we are doing worksheets this summer to avoid brain drain and now I'm afraid he will be too advanced by the time school starts to stay in Kindergarten. He's learning so fast now. Just BE PATIENT. DON'T PUSH, and her time will come. In my state, they teach small words in Kindergarten. They don't need to know how to read before. The most important thing would be that she knows her letters, letter sounds. identification on letters and # up to 10, how to put them in order, count, and such. If they do require her to know how to read they are crazy! Preschool may have been teaching her but I think maybe just to get her familiar with looking at words closer. How they are formed. i would call your school and ask what they require before continuing.

Sylvia - posted on 06/20/2010

1,315

8

31

Really, she's 5 and her school are upset because she's not reading yet?!?! Poor kid :(

You know, some kids teach themselves to read at age 3 or 4, and others don't figure it out until closer to 7 ... but by the time they're 9 or so, it all evens out. There's no real advantage to be gained from trying to teach kids to read before they're ready -- it's like trying to teach them to walk before they're ready, just an exercise in frustration for everyone.

What the research says is that kids whose parents read to them and who see their parents reading, kids who have lots of books in the house and see that their parents value reading, do better at reading themselves. So if you're concerned, I have to say that's what I'd suggest. I know you aren't parenting her full time, which makes it harder -- but if you can, try to make reading a leisure activity, not a chore or a battle. Don't "work with her"; offer to read to her, whatever she wants you to read even if it's something that makes you roll your eyes ;^), and gradually get her to start taking a turn at reading -- just a few words at a time to start with. Look for fun picture books with some repeated phrases that she can start to recognize. Point out interesting words out in the world: on bus marquees, on street signs, on storefronts ...

Frankly, at this young age I think the most important thing is not to turn kids off reading. Unless there's a learning disability of some kind, kids who love reading get better at it all on their own once they've got the basics. My DD (who is 7 and finishing Grade 2 in a couple of weeks) still has trouble with some longer words, still mispronounces a lot of words (she read "heirloom" as "her-lum" earlier today, for instance), but she reads all. the. time. -- and I can see her getting better, not because anyone is working with her on it but because, well, practice makes ... better. My little brother had a lot of trouble in school because of his, ahem, unusual attitude toward authority figures and busywork -- but he read himself The Lord of the Rings when he was 8, just because he wanted to. Our family is full of enthusiastic readers, because all of us grew up almost literally surrounded by books and reading. So if you want your stepdaughter to become a better reader, probably the best thing you can do is show her how much fun it is, so she'll want to learn to do it herself :)

[deleted account]

I started my 4 year old out with the BOB series of readers which I found at my local library. The set I used had listen along cd's and worked very well at building the pre-emergent reading skills she needed. To learn more about the BOB series check out my blog http://aileenwstewart.blogspot.com/2010/...

Angie - posted on 06/20/2010

2,621

0

406

We went back to the basics: Dick and Jane and Bob Books. Bob Books were particulary helpful. We read EVERYTHING from street signs to cereal boxes.

Lisa - posted on 06/20/2010

1

15

0

my daughter's teacher said learning site words work the best. I wasn't sure at the time if I believed her. But by the time my daughter was in first grade, she could read Little House on the Praire!!

Carol - posted on 06/19/2010

9

60

1

Try GETTING READER RABBIT computer games. Also if you can read to her, that will help. Purchase some Sight word cards. May times you can go on Preschool wbsites and get Ideas. Try www.everythingpreschool.com
www.dltk-teachkids.com. Just to name a few. they have different things you can use to help her read. You can also use the STEPS 1,2,3 readers they also have preschool levels as well. You can purchase those at pretty much any store and those will help as well.

[deleted account]

Another good thing to do is pick out some books she likes, then pick out about 5 words that repeat throughout the book. Show them to her and say them out loud and let her repeat them. Then read the book to her as you point to every word. When you come to one of the chosen words, stop reading and let her read that word.

It is less overwhelming than trying to read whole sentences, but more stimulating than just memorizing a word or 2 to say when you stop.

[deleted account]

I used the book "Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons"

It is a modified version if the DISTAR program which is based on phonics rather than memorization. I HIGHLY recommend it--the book is ALL you need, and it only costs about $15 at Barnes&Noble, Books-a-Million, or Amazon.com

The lessons are VERY short to begin with (less than 10 minutes per day) so she won't get frustrated & give up so easily. Once she gains some speed, the lessons get to be around 20 minutes, but that's really the longest.

It is very simple--no catchy rhymes or colorful pictures, but it works incredibly well.

[deleted account]

i cant suggest how to teach her, but - forcing her to read my backfire on you... she may grow up to hate reading. my son is 6 and reads at a 3rd graders level according to the Lexile test - and all we did with him, was sat down, cuddled up on the couch, and read to him, but eventually we got to the point where we would point to words in a really familiar story and get him used to seeing the words. in kindergarten they start by using site words,... I, am, we, the, be, for, and, but .... then after they master those, they start learning how to combine site words with other sounds to form longer words.. its frustrating, but, one teacher told us that for most kids it doesnt "click" til they are half way through kindergarten... just keep reading to her, and make reading fun so she wants to learn =)

Michelle - posted on 06/19/2010

485

19

93

make up flash cards, when she gets 5 right in a row she gets a small treat such as a M&M, she will also learn more when she gets into school.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms