What is a good book to teach your kid about his changes in life w/o too much info. I bought What's happpening to me & just too much info for a 9yr old

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Aimey - posted on 03/25/2009

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hya Tammy!



here is a link to an awesome sex education pack, that was a joy to me and my daughter.



http://www.familylife.com/site/c.dnJHKLN...



this is the Passport to Purity , by Dennis and Barbara Rainey.   there is a pack for  a boy or a girl and it was very discreet.  



it is geared toward a preteen age child in both genders and i think you will love the entire thing.   we took a weekend together and went shopping and took breaks to work through the sections of the book, and at the end of the day we ate out at Olive Garden and i gave my daughter a purity ring.    She just loved it.    



we had  so much fun!



i am sure that this curriculem would be a blast for anyone male or female.



sincerely Aimey Williams

Leslie - posted on 03/24/2009

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Not sure about the boys. I never thought about the boys changes. Will have to do that soon though as I do have a son



I have found that my daughter (turning 9 in May and already developing her breasts) took very well to the book put out by American Girl "The Care and Keeping of You". I told her that if she had any questions to ask and we would talk abou it. Thankfully she read the book before her breasts started to develop so she understood what was happening.

Meg - posted on 03/24/2009

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My kids are 12, 9, and 3. I'm a sex ed teacher for grades 4 to 12. The series I most highly recommend, for age appropriateness, thoroughness, and accessibility, is by Robbie Harris with illustrations by Michael Emberley:

It's Not the Stork:  A book about Girls, Boys, Families, and Friends (ages 4 and up)

http://www.amazon.com/Its-Not-Stork-Fami...

It's So Amazing: A book about Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families (ages 7+)

http://www.amazon.com/Its-So-Amazing-Fam...

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex and Sexual Health (ages 10+)    http://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Norm...

(For a teenager, there is no better book than Changing Bodies, Changing Lives, by Ruth Bell and the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, but that's a ways off for you . http://www.amazon.com/Changing-Bodies-Li... )

All of these books are excellent. There are a few levels of information, told through a dialogue between the two narrator characters as well as more detailed accompanying text, so kids can just read the conversation or read the text, or just look at the pictures (Aww, trees make baby trees, whales make baby whales, and mice make baby mice, just like people make baby people! Look at the mouse family having a picnic! -from It's So Amazing - )

If you feel your 9 year old is overwhelmed by the What's Happening to Me book, maybe step down a bit and get It's Not the Stork, so it's not so personal. Don't put too much pressure on yourself or him. Having books in the house, where he knows he can read when he wants, is a big step.

Another excellent tool is the Our Whole Lives sex ed curriculum through the Unitarian Universalist Church and the United Church of Christ.The 4th-6th grade section works very well as a parent-led family conversation, and sets the ground work for discussing body change and puberty and communication, at a pace the family sets and feels comfortable with. This is the curriculum I use.

http://www.uua.org/religiouseducation/cu...

I also got my oldest The Boy's Guide to Becoming a Teen by the AMA, which covers hygiene as well as body change and some solid basics of sex ed. I'm not sure how much of it he's actually read, but I know he has the info available.



 

Meg - posted on 03/24/2009

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My kids are 12, 9, and 3. I'm a sex ed teacher for grades 4 to 12. The series I most highly recommend, for age appropriateness, thoroughness, and accessibility, is by Robbie Harris with illustrations by Michael Emberley:

It's Not the Stork:  A book about Girls, Boys, Families, and Friends (ages 4 and up)

http://www.amazon.com/Its-Not-Stork-Fami...

It's So Amazing: A book about Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families (ages 7+)

http://www.amazon.com/Its-So-Amazing-Fam...

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex and Sexual Health (ages 10+)    http://www.amazon.com/Its-Perfectly-Norm...

(For a teenager, there is no better book than Changing Bodies, Changing Lives, by Ruth Bell and the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, but that's a ways off for you . http://www.amazon.com/Changing-Bodies-Li... )

All of these books are excellent. There are a few levels of information, told through a dialogue between the two narrator characters as well as more detailed accompanying text, so kids can just read the conversation or read the text, or just look at the pictures (Aww, trees make baby trees, whales make baby whales, and mice make baby mice, just like people make baby people! Look at the mouse family having a picnic! -from It's So Amazing - )

If you feel your 9 year old is overwhelmed by the What's Happening to Me book, maybe step down a bit and get It's Not the Stork, so it's not so personal. Don't put too much pressure on yourself or him. Having books in the house, where he knows he can read when he wants, is a big step.

Another excellent tool is the Our Whole Lives sex ed curriculum through the Unitarian Universalist Church and the United Church of Christ.The 4th-6th grade section works very well as a parent-led family conversation, and sets the ground work for discussing body change and puberty and communication, at a pace the family sets and feels comfortable with. This is the curriculum I use.

http://www.uua.org/religiouseducation/cu...

I also got my oldest The Boy's Guide to Becoming a Teen by the AMA, which covers hygiene as well as body change and some solid basics of sex ed. I'm not sure how much of it he's actually read, but I know he has the info available.



 

Bethany - posted on 03/23/2009

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I don't have any boys and I too searched out a "book" for my daughter ~ almost 8 at the time. . . I use the book to start conversations. It was an American Girl book (obviously things are different for boys), but it covered the simple ~ how to take care of your hair, to choosing a bra, to periods/menstruation, etc. I liked that I could either read it to my daughter and explain things she didn't understand, or I could let her read it in privacy if she were to become uncomfortable and she could ask me questions, or I could follow up with "so what do you think about this . . . " I'm sure plain talk is best, but I didn't know where to start and seriously I wanted something that wasn't just about sex, so I loved the hygiene side of this book as well!

Good luck and I think for me it's difficult since my parents never talked to me and I still wonder if I even understand things correctly sometimes!

Talisha - posted on 03/23/2009

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Is it too much for him or too much for you?  It's just a question to think about.  I had the talk with my children at different times but no later than 6 or 7.  I wanted to let my girls know that there was nothing to be ashamed of and also I wanted to let them be shocked by hearing me say sex, or vagina enough to know that if they have the question, you can't shock mommy.  I want them to know that they can come to me with any question.  Also, so much is happening now with other children that they bring it to school.  I don't want any child to be able to come to my daughters with any information that they don't already have and know the real truth about.  Kids are talking, whether we want to admit it or not.  It's best for them to have enough info and not the wrong info. 

Katie - posted on 03/23/2009

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I would definetly get dad involved. Who knows what changes he will be going through better than dad. I know dad's are some times reluctant, but this is a very important subject. Maybe he could take him fishing or something and talk about it then. It doesn't have to be deep. And then he can ask th questions he wants to ask without feeling uncomfortable.

Carrie - posted on 03/23/2009

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Talk to them and be very open about any questions they ask.  My 8 yo asked his dad what sex was and my husband freaked out and told him not to ask.  I was upset that we lost the opportunity to talk to him about it.  This last year he luckily asked again and my husband was a lot more open.  He answered the question and any others that followed.  It actually ended up being a very detailed discussion, but now he knows.  He was hearing a lot of things from his friends at school that just didn't make sense to him.  By being open about the topic, we were able to give him the correct information and add in our family values along the way.  Just try not to act shocked with the things they say and ask. 



 



I'm so glad we were honest with our son.  He now feels very comfortable talking to us about anything going on and things his friends say.  He know he's not going to get into trouble for asking.  WE are the source to go to, not his friends.

[deleted account]

Talk is perfect and the book was probably okay. Nine year old's know more than we give them credit for knowing (the shelterd and un shelterd ones).

Marcelle - posted on 03/22/2009

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Hi



I agree, talk not books. And get dad involved. We've started more family / life type movies where subjects like that do get shown / discussed. It provokes questions from the 13yo or 11yo, and we answer it as it is asked, only as much information as they need. The questions get more detailed as time goes on, but most of the time it is not too hard to handle.



I also agree, it doesn't get easier to talk about it, so might as well start out the way you want to continue. To me that is anything can be discussed as a family so you don't have (fingers crossed) hidden corners later. So far it is working fine.



hth

Sara - posted on 03/22/2009

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If you can't talk about sex (or anything else now) you won't be able to talk about it later.  It doesn't get easier!

[deleted account]

I thnk that the best way to explain changes is through conversation, not books. Not only does it give the child a chance to ask questions, and seek the information that he is ready to hear, but shows him that you are there to guide him. This will come in handy when he is older and wants to talk about dating, drugs/ alcohol, peer pressure. All of that great stuff that we would rather they just avoid.

Sara - posted on 03/21/2009

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Does it have to be a book?  Maybe you can read the book that was overkill for him and talk to him about it. 

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