who has or has not sent their child to pre-school?

Kelly - posted on 06/28/2010 ( 140 moms have responded )

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I have a four year old that I may or may not put into pre-school this fall. I'm looking for feedback and opinions/advice on children starting school as a kindergardner. I didn't attend pre-school and I feel I turned out fine education-wise. Did your child fall behind by not going? Or did your child lack much needed social skills because of not going? HELP!

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Chrystal - posted on 06/29/2010

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Objectives for children at the end of the pre-school year (from my children's school)
Shows ability to adjust to new situations. 2. Demonstrates appropriate trust in adults. 3. Recognizes own feelings and manages them appropriately. 4. Stands up for rights. 5. Demonstrates self-direction and independence. 6. Takes responsibility for own well-boing. 7. Respects and cares for classroom environment and materials. 8. Follows classroom routines. 9. Follows classroom rules. 10. Plays well with other children. 11. Recognizes the feelings of other and responds appropriately. 12. Shares and respects the rights of others. 13. Uses thininking skills to resolve conflicts. 14. Demonstrated basic locomotor skills (running, jumping, hopping, galloping). 15. Shows balance while moving. 16. Climbs up and down. 17. Pedals and steers a tricycle (or other wheeled vehicle) 18. Demontrates throwing, kicking, and catching skills. 19. Controls small muscles in hands. 20. coordinates eye-hand movement. 21. Uses tools for writing and drawing. 22. Observes objects and events with curiosity. 23. Approaches problems flexibly. 24. Shows persistence in approaching tasks 25. Explores cause and effect 26. Applies knowledge or experience to a new context. 27. classifies object 28. Compares/measures 29. Arranges objects in a series. 30. Recognizes patters and can repeat them. 31. Shows awareness of time concepts and sequence. 32. Shows awareness of position in space 33. uses one-to-one correspondence. 34. Uses numbers and counting. 35. takes on pretend roles and situations. 36. makes believe with objects. 37. makes and interprets representations. 38. hears and discriminates the sounds of language. 39. expresses self using words and expanded sentences. 40. understands and follows oral directions 41. answers questions. 42. asks questions 43. actively participates in conversations. 44. enjoys and values reading 45. demonstrates understanding of print concept. 46. demonstrated knowledge of the alphabet. 47. uses emerging reading skills to make meaning from print. 48. comprehends and interprets meaning from books and other texts. 49 understands the purpose of writing. 50 writes letter and words.

There is much of this that you can do at home, at the park, at the library, and through play groups. Good luck in whatever choice you make. Do what is right for you and your family and don't feel guilty when you make that choice. I think too many people criticize others decisions but everyone has to do what is right for their own family. No two families are the same.

Ashley - posted on 01/25/2012

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My daughter is an only child so I felt that she needed to attend pre-school for academics AND the social skills. I had been working with her at home with writing, letter recognition, and things like that since she was 2 years old. Once I put her in pre-school I learned that they don't teach them anything that you can't teach them at home. She was already a well mannered child due to the fact that she was always around adults, so once she was in pre-school I realized that she was one of the better behaved children in the class. I took her out after the 1st semester because I didn't feel that she was learning anything more than she was learning at home except the other children's bad behavior. :(

Victoria - posted on 06/28/2010

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My daughter didn't go to pre-k and ended up being one of the fastest learners in her class.She was reading and writing before all of the other kids! I was a little worried when school first started because other children had attended pre-k but lots of them didnt even know how to write there name when they started...I think it just depends on you and what you have worked on with them before they start school.Social wise she did just great:) A little shy at first but after a week or two they get into the swing of things and my daughter was already asking to have playdates everyday!

Minna - posted on 11/13/2012

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Do what you want! Maybe a few times a week? I wanted the extra time with my kids. I quit a job I liked to do this whole mom thing,so I deserved it. The youngest started kindergarten late, so we did do 6 hours a week preschool for a year. He didn't learn much there, but he sure had fun.We did story-time at the library so they learned to sit still. We actually had kids to play with in the neighborhood [yay! no official play-dates] Went to the park, baked, made stuff, looked for fossils, got up at 2 am to see meteor showers, planted a garden. We also had days when we stayed in our pajamas and vegged in front of the t.v. It was all good.

My kids didn't suffer in the least, they're in collage and high school,and they're more than OK.

I feel lucky that I had that option. I think our early closeness has given them the confidence to go wherever their dreams lead them . minna

Nicole - posted on 07/01/2010

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My daughter went to Pre-K 3 & 4. Unfortunately, I became a working mom when she was about 3 therefore someone was going to have to watch her other than me. I didn't not want to throw away my money on daycare so I found a PreSchool, Elementary and Junior and the best part it was down the street and was a Catholic private school. This past year (Kinder) four kids in her class were ahead of her class and she was one of them.

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Evie - posted on 06/14/2013

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Donna, can I assume you didn't go to preschool at 2 and benefit from the opportunity to learn social skills?

Barbara - posted on 11/16/2012

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Both my boys went to pre-school because I work full time. I had good experiences in the pre-schools that they went to. I found them to be very social and they thrive to learn. I was amazed on what they were learning as I compare what they learned to what I learned. My youngest one who now is 6 had learned about the planets, Spanish and knows most of the states. I have been blow away about what he already knows. My oldest son loves biology and he is only in 3rd grade and loves reading. He won this summer a medal for reading the most books during the summer for his age group. I do feel pre-school did help both of them and to tell the truth I had to send them to pre-school because I work full time.

Heidi - posted on 08/20/2012

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All three of my children skipped pre-school and attended a school with a 2 yr kindergarten. 2 of them are honor students.

Bethany - posted on 08/14/2012

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As a teacher, I think that all children should have some exposure to preschool/daycare/pre-k. Even if you are teaching your child all that they need to know academically, socially they have a high chance of suffering. You can tell the difference between kindergarteners who have always been at home and those that have had some time being out of the house and around other children. Preschool will help your child socialize with other children and always learn to listen to other adults.

Audrey - posted on 08/13/2012

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Karen, we have one not too too far away. I bet the employees are very knowledgeable also. Thank you!

Karen - posted on 08/13/2012

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Audrey - do you have a teacher's store near you? I've found that those have some great resources. Sometimes my DD would "play school" with her toys and would use some of the workbooks for that purpose so it was more play than work.

Audrey - posted on 08/13/2012

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Thank you Carla! Those are all great tips. I like to think we do those things anyway, but I definitely have room to be more consistent, like with the stair counting, etc. Can't wait to start!

Carla - posted on 08/13/2012

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http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7lveF...**http%3a//www.youtube.com/watch%3fv=GS8GTWOSA60


Audrey, this is the YouTube link for what they taught my youngest, and she LOVED it! Of course, we didn't have computers back then, so they had flash cards they sent home with the kids. I particularly remember 'Mr M with his munching mouth'--this was Randi's favorite ;)

Our granddaughter has a problem with her tongue, it's attached too much, so she doesn't have as much mobility with it. She has had a little trouble with sounds, so we exaggerate them, both with sound speaking it, but also showing her what our mouths look like as we say them. We spent a great deal of time with both of them asking them what mouse starts with 'mmm', you know?

It sounds like you have done a great job so far, he will be just fine. Try to make a learning experience out of everything you do. We counted the steps we went up, what color is this, can you find something that starts with 'r', then give them an example, etc. When we go to the store, we tell them what we're looking for, and if they don't recognize the package, we tell them it starts with whatever the letter. It keeps them occupied in the store, and teaches them as well.

God bless, sweetheart, he's gonna be just fine!

Audrey - posted on 08/13/2012

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With all due respect, I completely disagree with Donna. A child does not belong with other kids at age 2. MOST of the children who are in that situation are there because their mothers want a "break" not because it's what is best for the child. The ONLY place a child should be at that age is on his mommy's lap being read to.

Audrey - posted on 08/13/2012

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Hi, Kelly. I'm with you. I have a 4 year old. He is my last of 5 and I just recently decided to keep him at home the year before kindergarten. All my other 4 went to preschool (only the year before K-never any daycare...only school) and they are above average academically. BUT, I've always felt that a child can learn much more one on one from a parent than 12-1 with virtual strangers. Each of my first four had some "reason" I felt they should go to PK for a year; develop language skills, meet other kids, learn to sit stiller, etc. This last guy is very age-appropriate and he speaks clearly, sits still when needed, interacts well, etc. I went back and forth with myself and my husband wondering if he needed the "experience". I finally came to the conclusion that his best experience would be learning at home with me. The only thing that still worries me is, will I be able to teach him properly what sounds the letters make, etc. I still have to research what materials I will need. So......if you decide to homeschool and find any good materials, please pass them on. Good Luck!

Jennifer - posted on 08/11/2012

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Wow, Donna, don't you think that that was a bit harsh? My oldest son never went to preschool and guess what? He is going in to third grade at the top if his class. He knew his abc's, most of his colors, mot of his numbers, and he could socialize with other children before kindergarten. He now reads above a 3rd grade level, in fact he does everything above a 3rd grade level. He is a wonderful child and is one of the smartest kids at his school. My son was never in a daycare, play school, or co op either. Kids do not necessarily need to be put in to any thing like that. You not setting your child up for failure just because you didn't put them in to something like that as soon as you got the chance. It is a good thing to put them in to, because it gives you a break and it let's them make new friends, but they can do that other places as well. I am going to try and get my 3 year old in to Head Start, just because I think it would be fun for him and he is super smart as well, so I think it'll help a bit more. Kelly, don't let anyone make your decision for you or make you feel like a bad mother just because your child isn't in preschool. Back at Donna, how do you know she doesn't have her child in a youth group, or play group or something. Keep in mind, that their are children every where, all a parent has to do is take their child or children downto the local park or something and they can build their social skills there.

Erica Kay - posted on 08/10/2012

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I put my son in 2 years of head start before he started kindergarten and it helped him out big time. This year I am doing the same for my daughter.

Yeshica - posted on 08/07/2012

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Putting them in preschool helps with their social skills and it gives them a little independence. But ultimately you have to comfortable with sending your child to preschool.

Marci - posted on 08/07/2012

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I put both of my children in pre-school and basically the only reason I put them in was to help with their socializing skills, to teach them a little about a classroom environment and to be used to being left at school, where mommy and daddy couldn't be with them all day. As in terms of educational part of pre-school, I believe it really did help them get ahead of the game. They learned to spell and write their first and last names, knew all their letters and numbers, knew their shapes, they knew how to read a few words, knew all their colors, etc. All of which, I believe they can learn at home with help from mom and dad. Honestly, I think it all depends on the child. Some do just great without preschool and some feel a little behind, but in the end they all catch up to each other. To me age plays more of a difference then if they went to preschool or not. My son went to Kindergarten when he was 4 (October baby) and he was behind in some basic motor skills that can only be gained in time, but he did fine in the end.

Karen - posted on 08/06/2012

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I've been thinking about @Donna response all day and it bothers me how judgemental people are about other's parenting choices. First of all, until someone shows me the research that says that one approach is overwhelmingly better than another, I'll continue to take the approach that each family usually knows what is best in their situation. Even then, each child is different and no approach will be 100% best for everyone so there will always be exceptions and we should allow for that. If you follow Donna's viewpoint to its logical conclusion, the classmate of my DD's would be irreparably harmed by the fact that his folks did not start him in school until the age of 6 (not to mention all Swedish children are harmed because they usually don't start until the age of 7!). On the contrary, the classmate would have been harmed by starting school because his Grandfather, to whom he was extremely close, was dying of cancer when the child was 3-5 y.o. Taking his time away from those last few years with his Grandfather would have been worse than waiting to start him in school at the age of 6 rather than at the age of 3 because some unrelated person deems it so. He is the nicest, most caring, best socialized kid who has no issues academically either (and he's very tall and obviously older than the other kids which is not an issue either). So, to make a blanket statement based on no knowledge of the child and/or the family situation is much more harmful than starting them in school later than is deemed "best".

Jean Elizabeth - posted on 08/06/2012

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Children are natural learners. They are curious about everything. They don't pre-school or school to learn about their world or to learn to read or to learn math or anything else. My guys (12, 9, and 4 months) have never been to school and there have never been problems with them learning exactly what they need to know :)

Sherri - posted on 08/06/2012

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@Donna kids don't NEED preschool until they are 4yrs old. They certainly do not NEED preschool at 2yrs old.

Karen - posted on 08/06/2012

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Wow, Donna, a bit harsh, don't you think? The OP asked for reasons why people put their kids into preschool or did not do so, not to be harangued for what you obviously viewed as a poor parenting choice. Since you have never met her or her child, your blanket statement about setting her child up to fail is not only unhelpful but more than likely not applicable to her situation.

I personally did not send my child to preschool until she was 4 because she was not ready for a schedule until then. I am a SAHM and she had plenty of socialization opportunities - library, church, family, friends' kids, community ed classes, t-ball, etc. 4 was the perfect age for her. We also read to her from a very early age and took her plenty of places. Due to her early exposure to many situations and people of many ages she is as comfortable interacting with adults and kids. She also is not entering 4th grade and is an avid reader (8th grade level) and has many interests and friends. The only socialization issues that we have are the usual things that come with girls of her age. So no, we did not set her up for failure by sending her to "daycare at the age of 2" or to school "at the earliest age possible" but did it when she was ready. For us, that worked the best. The OP needs to know that there are many options available and she should look at what is best for her family (remember, preschool costs $$ in many places and is that the best use of your funds?) and her child and not push the child into something before they are ready. In my opinion, that is more likely to set the child up for failure then sending them too early.

Your child will not necesarily fall behind in any area by not sending them to preschool at the age of 3 or 4, it depends on the child and the program. In my DD's class, there is a mixture of kids who started at 3, 4, did not go, did daycare, etc. and I can't tell the difference between them (they're now entering 4th grade). The answer is what is best for you.

Donna - posted on 08/05/2012

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What I would like to know is why isn't your son/daughter already in preschool? The social skills that a child attains while attending preschool cannot possibly be gained in the next several months before heading off to Kindergarten. Your son/daughter should have already been attending preschool from the earliest age possible (usually around 2 years).

Having no idea what to expect from Kindergarten, you are sending your child into the unknown and will have more problems and upsets on your hands than you could ever imagine, let alone know how to handle. You are setting your child up to fail before he/she even sets foot in a regular classroom. You are, in my opinion, doing your child a great disservice by not already having had him/her in preschool long before now.

Your son/daughter most likely has no idea how to interact with other children (unless he/she has been in at the minimum - daycare). Most Kindergarten classes are full-time now, although not everywhere. Having your child in preschool, especially if it is all day, is very beneficial, helps children acquire skills they would not get anywhere else, and teach them how to behave in social situations and give them an opportunity to express themselves appropriately.

My daughter went to daycare as an infant and then when she turned 2, I immediately put her into preschool so that she could start learning social skills and other important skills that would prepare her for school in general.

Good luck deciding what to do. Personally I think it's way too late to worry about putting your child in preschool now and just wait until it is time for him/her to start Kindergarten.

Jennifer - posted on 04/26/2012

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I taught my son at home. I made playdates almost every day with other kids we met at the park or other mommy groups for my son's socialization. I taught him shapes, colors, numbers (adding and subtracting using Popsicle sticks). I also taught him his letters, letter sounds, and how to read using a website i found with free videos www.FirstStepReading.com. I think he is prepared. But, you have to do what you think is best for your child.

Kris - posted on 01/23/2012

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One of my brothers didn't go to kinder, he went straight to school and due to this he wasn't ready and was kept down in preps, not once but twice. I believe if he was to attend a kinder, mother and father would have not sent him to school for that embarassment. to this day that still affects him deeply. He feels like a reject and a idiot as he was the only one he knows to be kept down in preps, not once but twice.

Due to thismy brither left school in year 10, if he hadn't been keot down I feel he would be in year 12. He couldn't cope with his friends leaving before him and all that.



I weighted this up with my own children and decided to send my son to kinder last year and it is a good thing I did as at the beginning well end of term 2 he showed signs of not being ready for school then by the end of term 3 and then 4 he showed improvemnet and was definately ready for school and starts school in just a few days.

i took this positive experience and decided that my daughter Leia will follow in his steps and get a positive start to school life when she is able to go.

then i will do it again for my now going on 4 month old when she is ready.

Trisha - posted on 01/21/2012

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I have been a stay at home mom since the birth of my daughter and we struggled with the decision of preschool or no preschool. We chose to put her in preschool and I am soooo glad that we did. For starters, it gets them use to a school routine/setting and following rules. I actually wish I would have put her in the 3 year old class the year before as she is majorly lacking social skills. I don't feel it makes much difference education wise as I always worked with her. Socially though I believe it helps a lot. She is having so much fun too even if it is only 2 1/2 hours 3 days a week. At preschool they are more relaxed with the rules and understand that it's the childs first experience. Kindergarten is not so understanding since most teachers may think all kids have either been in preschool or daycare. I would say to anyone thinking about it to GO FOR IT!! :)

Jaimie - posted on 01/20/2012

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I did, school moves so quickly now, it also allowed me to see what he should be aware of and how he compared to those around him and put in in touch with other moms with similar issues. My son also experienced his first friends that he picked that were not at daycare

Darylin - posted on 01/20/2012

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My husband and I both work so we didn't have an option of not sending our daughter to pre-school. But as an only child I feel that nursery and pre-school help her, A LOT. Not only with social skills but just her exposure to other authority figures outside of mom and dad was great. She got to learn how to interact with adults and multiple children.

Meily - posted on 01/19/2012

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sent my son to pre-school i was dreading the thought of having to go through separation anxiety that my son will feel; eventually he got over that after 5 days and is fond of the thought of having new found friends :) he was really shy before and was only attached to mommy and daddy; was even reluctant of playing with other kids. now he is a social butterfly.... i guess it all depends on what you think your child needs. in my case i think my needs to open up to other people and not be shy therefore i sent him to pre-school plus it is something that i feel would keep him interested, busy at the same time enjoy. It's pre-school so it consists of mostly singing, art, playtime and basic letters and nos. I dont think sending them or not sending them (to pre-school) makes any differences on how the excel in the future academically speaking. For those who had said that sending/not sending their kids had made a difference in their child's current/future academic accomplishment i think are just to quick to conclude the reason behind it all. It's Pre-school guys not Masters; these lil' fellows just go to pre-school to have fun and enjoy the company of kids their age. Learning arts and crafts, music, story time and basic alphabet and nos. sure is not the key to determine a child's academic success in the future. Some people attended pre-school, some not yet both have their fair share of future success.

Meily - posted on 01/19/2012

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sent my son to pre-school i was dreading the thought of having to go through separation anxiety that my son will feel; eventually he got over that after 5 days and is fond of the thought of having new found friends :) he was really shy before and was only attached to mommy and daddy; was even reluctant of playing with other kids. now he is a social butterfly.... i guess it all depends on what you think your child needs. in my case i think my needs to open up to other people and not be shy therefore i sent him to pre-school plus it is something that i feel would keep him interested, busy at the same time enjoy. It's pre-school so it consists of mostly singing, art, playtime and basic letters and nos. I dont think sending them or not sending them (to pre-school) makes any differences on how the excel in the future academically speaking. For those who had said that sending/not sending their kids had made a difference in their child's current/future academic accomplishment i think are just to quick to conclude the reason behind it all. It's Pre-school guys not Masters; these lil' fellows just go to pre-school to have fun and enjoy the company of kids their age. Learning arts and crafts, music, story time and basic alphabet and nos. sure is not the key to determine a child's academic success in the future. Some people attended pre-school, some not yet both have their fair share of future success.

Kylee - posted on 01/13/2012

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Preschool is great and research has proven:



* Practice with social skills. By taking part in sing-alongs and story time, hands-on art projects and simple experiments, dress-up and building-block sessions, two- to five-year-olds gain experience taking turns, following directions, and cooperating with their pint-sized peers. One of the other benefits of preschool: Social butterflies who may be bored at home can spread their wings in a group setting, while wee wallflowers who aren’t born minglers may blossom when they’re part of the preschool pack.

* Introduction to the basics. Preschool benefits include exposure to letters by singing songs, to numbers through counting blocks, to language skills during story time, to basic math concepts through cooking, and to colors through finger-painting — all fun (and sometimes messy!) activities that boost kids’ curiosity and knowledge in a pressure-free way. Your child will also glimpse botany, biology, and geology during nature walks; shapes by putting puzzles together; and the seasons through collages (and just going outside!).

* Learning about the wider world. The more your child plays, explores, and sees for himself, the more he’ll learn. At preschool, the opportunities for discovery are limitless. At the water table, he’ll figure out that some objects sink and others float; on an autumn nature walk, he’ll see that leaves dry up and fall down; and in the playground, he’ll learn that trikes are easier to ride on smooth surfaces and harder on rough ones.

* A chance to create. Preschool teachers have lots of arts-and-crafts projects up their rolled sleeves. Your pint-sized artist will have more chances to channel his inner Picasso at preschool than he’d have at home (plus, you won’t have to clean up after him!).

* Lots of fun. Sure, you have loads of toys, books, and activities at home. But at preschool, your little one will have at his chubby fingertips a plethora of playthings — a veritable wonderland of fun and games (and don’t forget, at this age fun is the name of the game).

* Expert direction. While you are your child’s first and most influential teacher, he (and you) will have lots to learn, too, from the professionals (who happen to be trained in child development).



THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Children enrolled in a full-time preschool program that sees them through elementary school have a better life 25 years later than children who were not in preschool do, University of Minnesota researchers report.



Children who went through preschool have higher incomes, higher education levels, a higher socioeconomic status and are less likely to abuse drugs or be involved in criminal activities, the investigators found. They are also more likely to have health insurance coverage.



"These effects haven't been found before for public programs, so the findings are encouraging to provide access to high-quality programs through public funding for kids at risk," said lead researcher Arthur J. Reynolds, a professor in the university's Institute of Child Development.



Preschool also seemed to be especially beneficial for males and children from high-risk or impoverished families.



The report was published in the June 9 issue of Science.http://health.usnews.com/health-news/fam...



I have taught my kids all of the basics like abc's, counting, a bit of spanish, and to write their names but they have learned sooooo much their 2 years of preschool. I think its a great thing. Why not get more education? I dont see where it would be a bad thing at all.

Krista - posted on 01/13/2012

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My son never went to preschool. He is now in SK and I really regret not sending him. He is really behind. The standards are crazy high these days in kindergarten. My suggestion would be to search what kind of stuff your child should be doing at their age. If they are on track educationally, send them only if you want. If they are behind, I suggest sending to preschool. My son requires a tutor at our house multiple times a week because he is so behind.

Catherine - posted on 01/08/2012

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Both my boys started nursery as babies, I left my husband last year and they have attended different nurseries in the last year, I feel this has given them the skils and the space to deal with issues arising and someone outside the family to talk to. Both my boys are strong independant (they still need a cuddle) I feel being at nursery has allowed them to move on quickly. There are academical benefits also which make way for easier learning when they start school! It is the first step to an independant child, at preschool they also learn routines and how to follow instruction as a group making starting school easier!

They make decicions on kids starting based on how they listen, how well they take critism, how they can sit and concentrate, as well as other things. Unless they have serious issues IT IS NOT BASED ON ACADEMIC ABILITY! Knowing letters and numbers have nothing to do with it!

Kristina - posted on 01/08/2012

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My 3 yr old had to go to preschool because of speech issues. He only went 2 days a week and those 2 days were only for 2 hours. It is perfect. At four yrs old. he went to preschool for 4 days a week for two hours. It got him socialized and ready for kidnergarden later this year. I'm greatful for it. He seems to be more shy as he gets older so since he's already in this setting i'm not as concerned. That's just my story hope it hleps;)

Crystal - posted on 01/07/2012

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My son didn't go to preschool but I did a home school preschool via mail with him. I just made sure I knew what he would need to know to do well in Kindergarten. I wasn't so much concerned with his social skills because he was very outgoing and would make friends at the park and at other play places. My son did very well academically, he was actually at the top of his class! :) Socially he did well too ...and he's now a 1st grader and LOVES school! I think as long as you prepare your child for what the school expects them to know, you should be fine! I have a 4 year old daughter now too and I'll be doing the same thing with her.

Sara - posted on 01/07/2012

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Hi. I am a preschool teacher and the most important advice I could give is to checkout a preschool and see what you think.
Do the children seem engaged and happy? Do they get to explore and really play? Are there "too many" rules? What do the teachers do when children melt down, become very hyper, seem withdrawn. The most important aspect of preschool as far as a child is concerned is that they enjoy it. The other aspects to consider as far as being kindergarten ready are the different domains of learning.
Large Motor Skills:. skipping, hopping, balancing..
Fine Motor Skills: The ability to properly hold a pencil, tool, scissors, and have strong enough muscles to use them. (Playdough, squirty bottles, grinding, painting, sidwalk chalk, walking around like a crab, all help develop those muscles in hands and wrists).
Cognitive: Knowing how to count 10 items, recognizing numbers, recognizing the letters of the alphabet, doing age appropriate puzzles, patterning, keeping a rhythm, rhyming.
Social Emotional: Being able to ask for help, impulse control, entering play, relationships with peers and adults, expressing feelings.
I encourage parents to come and visit with their children to see if the program is a match, if you like and above all, if your child seems to like it.

Michelle - posted on 10/21/2011

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I did not enroll my child in preschool, or in public school at all, for that matter. he is a very social child, and not socially stunted. he is extremely discerning regarding making friends. As for his education, he has consistently outperformed other children in his age group/grade, according to his Basic Skills testing. He is now 11 (grade 6), reads at a 10th grade level, does 8th grade math, and is well adjusted.
On a side note, children now are taught things in preschool that WE were taught in kindergarten. So if you do not enroll your child in preschool, they may be behind their peers going into K.

R - posted on 10/16/2011

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A lot of it depends on what you are doing at home. A huge indicator of how children will do throughout schooling is if they can identify the letters before entering Kindergarten. If you are spending time doing educational activities with your child, and he socializes with others preschool might not be necessary. I haven't found any downfalls to having my son go to preschool.
My son's one preschool a language immersion preschool only meets 2 hours, twice a week but he loved it. Just that little bit of structure, independence, and exposure is very meaningful for children. He also now attends a traditional preschool which I researched for educational value, even something as simple as spelling the child's name while calling role is taking a simple task and making it educational. There were many different preschools and finding one that makes you and your child comfortable is a wonderful thing!

Melissa - posted on 10/14/2011

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i have not sent my 4 year old to pre-school i didnt go and i think he will be ok when school start next fall

Jodell - posted on 10/13/2011

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I have a 4 year old who has had a lot of developmental problems. She is slow... I am now getting her evaluated... and wish I would have started pre-school before.. I wish you luck on your decision....

Megan - posted on 10/08/2011

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Okay here's what I'm going to tell you because my siblings and I have all done something different. With my sister's kids they both had sitters and went to at least one year of preschool before starting kindergarten and did extremely well because she did her due dilligence in finding excellent sitters for her kids. They had they educational prep because the sitters youngest kids played teacher with them so they were ready for preschool. My brother's kids are a different story, for sitters he and his now ex-wife dumped them off on whoever would take them and none of the kids went to preschool. The oldest is now behind in his class because other than watching things on tv he didn't know anything. The second kid is behind in school and has to do remedial classes he's almost 6, the third child who is 3/4 is behind in her preschool because he waited too long to put her in and never stimulated her. His new wife is a teacher and even when they were dating she would tell him to put the kids in school instead of waiting because she could tell that they were behind and that schooling nowadays isn't like when we went, it's harder and kids are expected to have at least one year of preschool. Their youngest isn't even 1 and I'm fairly certain she made sure he goes to daycare even if it's for an hour. With my kids my oldest who is now 5 went to daycare until right before his brother was born and then started preschool at 2.5 because they had an early program and he's now in his 3rd year and loves it and his teachers tell us how much he has excelled since he started as a 2 year old. My two year old attends daycare which is the precursor to the three different preschools they have in the building and he does excellent and has really come out of his shell since he started about 6 months ago, he's actually talking now which he wouldn't do before. We plan on putting him in the early preschool if he gets accepted. With preschool and daycare kids get social interaction, independence, and learn a schedule in addition to starting the prep for what they will learn in kindergarten. Most schools around here require or advise that a child attends at least one year of preschool prior to kindergarten, the schools even changed the birth month limit earlier in the year so that they don't have the young/immature kids going to school too soon.

Meily - posted on 10/05/2011

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I sent my son to preschool (pre-nursery) at age 2.. Separation anxiety was the issue for the 1st 3wks because he grew so close and accustomed with just me and his dad being around. I was glad I sent him to school at that age because in 1 month of time he became more social to other adults and kids and because of influences of other kids he doesn't want to wear diapers anymore and was able to go potty all by himself. I don't think sending a kid to preschool meant they will or will not excel academically it has no relation because in preschool (pre nursery) it's more of establishing a routine, allowing them to be used to new people around them (social skill wise), and simply letting them enjoy and have fun together with other kids through the many activities the teachers comes up with. On the side, if you wish that your son/daughter excels academic wise at the early age of 2 or 3 it is really in your hand as you may teach him/her math, reading and/or spelling because their curriculum in pre nursery or nursery does not entail extensive practice in math or reading (only recognition and writing of numbers and letters)

Christi - posted on 07/16/2011

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I've done both. This doesn't mean your kids will turn out the same but: I am a ferm believer that if you can send them to pre-school it is a good idea that they go. BUT you have to be comfortable with the school and teachers. My oldest went to pre-school at 5 (because of his B-Day) but I pulled him out. He was mainly supposed to go becasue of his speech but the speech teaher kept canceling and I decided to pull him out of the pre-school (Head Start). He wasn't happy at all the whole time and I wasn't either. I didn't care for the teachers. My middle daughter they offer pre-school through the school system. She went to that the whole year and really didn't learn anything. She is in speech too. The teachers there weren't that great either. My youngest was in Head Start the three year old program and it was GREAT! He advanced like crazy. I think he's more advanced than his older siblings now. The teachers were great, they are smaller class sizes and fun. He loved it. I had a choice this year do I keep him in the four year old program at Head Start or move him to the school for pre-k. The decision was a no brainer. He is staying at the Head Start. He can see his teachers from last year and the new ones he is going to get are really great. I am impressed how much he has learned and I feel for once that my youngest isn't going to be behind when he starts Kindergarten. My other two where and are still paying for it. Because of such a wonderful time that I had watching my youngest grow and with the teachers I have decided to pursue a career in the Head Start. I have already started school to get there. So I would say look at all the facts. It has to be a good class, small is good no more than probably 10 to 15 kids but two teachers. With pre-K you can also volunteer. Make sure you like the teachers. Are they easy to talk to? Have they answered all your concerns? This is your baby they shouldn't talk to you like you are over reacting. Respect! It is difficult to put them in and walk away but after a little time you do get used to it. I cry every year for all my kids. I would say put him in and you can always pull them if you feel it isn't right. The social skills have been great for my son. Much better than if he didn't go. He was kind of shy when he went in and they worked with him to be more outgoing. Plus these kids he is going to go to school with when he finally does join up in the regular school. So he will already have friends. Give it a shot you really have nothing to loose. I would give it a good two to three months though. Say the turn of the year. If he hasn't adjusted and you don't feel comfortable then pull it. Hope this helps...

Teresa - posted on 07/14/2011

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My son would never have made it out of kindergarten with that list. That is crazy. That doesn't even sound like MY first grade year, and I graduated with honors. Pre-school gets the basics done here so I do think it's of value, but if your child just isn't ready wait a year.

Sherri - posted on 07/14/2011

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@Wendy this is why Preschool is soooo important here. They need to get prepared for what will be expected of them in Kindergarten. Just in preschool my son learned all his letter upper case and lowercase letters all of their sounds, needed to be able to read and write numbers from 1-10 and be able to count to 30 and be able to write 1st and last name. They learned more than this too but these were the most important things they needed to know.

When we had a parent teacher conferences they let us know hands down if they could not master these things by the end of the year they most likely would not be prepared for Kindergarten.

When registering them for Kindergarten you should of seen the questions they needed to know. Do they know their alphabet, can they write it, how far can they count, How many #'s can the recognize, can they write their name, do they know their address, phone #

Wendy - posted on 07/14/2011

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wow!!! reading that list actually shocks me!!! My daughter is 8 years old and in the UK she wouldn't be taught all of that til the age of about 6 or 7 even now she still doesn't know all the coin denominations that we have - and she's top in her class!!! that sounds an awful lot for a child to learn when they're not even in 1st grade!!

Sherri - posted on 07/13/2011

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Wow Michell our serious academic studying begins in Kindergarten. They must be able to read 100+ words fluently and pass an extensive math program in order to advance to 1st grade.
Counts forward by 1s to 99 and beyond starting from any number
Counts backward by 1s from 26
Counts by 2s to 28 and higher
Counts by 5s to 100 and higher
Counts by 10s to 100 and higher
Counts 31 or more objects
Represents numbers using bundles of 10s and 1s
Reads and writes numbers beyond 100
Compares and orders numbers from 0 to 20 and higher
Solves number stories
Reads and interprets graphs
Uses tools and techniques to compare temperature, time, weight, and length. Identifies coins and their values, along with the dollar bill Identifies 2 and 3 dimensional shapes Extends, describes, and creates patterns Sorts objects and identifies the rules

Michell - posted on 07/13/2011

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i've sent both my son & daughter to pre school because they showed signs that they are eager to study & learn more, you'll definitely see signs from your toddler, anyway for kids, preschool is just like playing with friends because they will likely just be taught to sing, recognize basic colors, pray, play, count 1-10 and simple things like that and that'll be so much fun for kids like yours, serious academic studying will kick in 1st grade so good luck in your decision! :D

Wendy - posted on 07/12/2011

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I put my daughter in pre-school simply because she was learning everything too fast I needed her to see that she didn't have to learn everything straight away! In the UK pre-school starts the term after your child turns 3, so she went to pre-school for about a year and a half in total and it did her the world of good, she got a whole bunch of new friends that helped slow her learning down so she didn't get too far ahead of the class, and she loved it. I will definately be sending both my boys when the time comes, but for different reasons mainly I want to get back to work so if they're at pre-school it means I can get a job!! lol

Teresa - posted on 07/11/2011

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I agree with Erica. The experience of being in a classroom with other kids, is good, especially if they've never been in daycare. The learning part, my son was in daycare from 15 months, went to preschool and is still starting 1st grade again. He has ADHD that we didn't diagnose until more than halfway through the year.

Erica - posted on 07/11/2011

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mine are 14, 8 & 5...my oldest attended and graduated pre-k and is average in school, middle child didn't attend pre-k and is a straight A student and an advanced reader...my youngest (aka hurricane heather lol) NEEDS to go and will be starting this month to prepare a little for kindergarten this year. (she's never been in daycare) i'm not concerned with the learning aspect of it but rather the structure and social skills they learn to prepare them for "real" school.

Brandy - posted on 07/23/2010

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I put my 4 year old in pre-school and she excelled in everything! Plus it got her really excited and prepared for kindergarten!! I think pre-k is great!!

Jennifer - posted on 07/21/2010

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My husband and I chose not to place our son in preschool primarily because we simply couldn't afford it, the schools in Northwest FL where we resided were all private school, no public preschools.
I worked with him at home to learn his abc's, numbers,colors, I personally don't regret it, he spends time at a park to play with other children and he sees mom and dad reading a lot, and we read to him.
I was and still hesitate to placing him straight in Kindergarten this year but with him being 5 yrs old I think he will do well and it may even encourage him to want to do more things. I am not a new mom, but each of my children were in different school districts when it was time for them to go and I was more comfortale placing them in preschool, pre-k then I was with my last one.
Only you know what your child is like, I am not sure if i was placed in preschool but I know I was in Kindergarten and I turned out fine.
Hope this helps some.

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