Tooth decay in 2 year old

Nichole - posted on 06/15/2010 ( 22 moms have responded )

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Hello; we took my son to a dentist (referred by a local dentist, as a pediatric dentist) when we noticed brown spots on his teeth. We had to wait 3 months (!!!) to get in to see them. They told us he did have some decay and recommended capping all of his teeth as a preventative measure while he was under general anesthesia. We sought a second opinion. We were referred to a pediatric dentist by our pediatrician who informed us the first dentist was not actually a pediatric dentist, just billed herself as one. The new dentist recommended pulling his 8 front teeth (top and bottom) to keep the decay from spreading and becoming severe, then filling one top tooth; he said they do not do general anesthesia; instead they give them a sedatvie and nitrous and then restrain them in a papoose. Needless to say, we are seeking a third opinion (we go today). My question to you is; have any of you dealt with tooth decay in young children? we do not feed my son lots of sugar, he's never been allowed pop and we brush his teeth 3 times a day (morning, nap, and night). We don't know why he got decay (he quit the bottle, on his own, right at 12 months and never took it more than nap and bedtime after he started sippy cups) and it really makes me feel horrible. Also, what would you do in this situation? I'm not about to leave my 2 year toothless, but I don't want this to cause and spread infections or rot out his adult teeth. Any thoughts????? Please help!

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Rebecca - posted on 07/19/2011

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hello! Please don't beat yourself up! My daughter Maddy is 20 months and has 2 caps! First I have extremely soft teeth and am cavity prone. Apparently Maddy has my soft teeth. We brush her teeth as best we can ( still a serious battle) and she does not eat much sugar at all. The dentist said it was a specific kind of decay called milk teeth. Milk teeth occurs when children are given a bottle or nursed to sleep. They fall asleep with milk in there mouth and both cows milk and breast milk have high sugar content. So the milk sits on the teeth and causes decay. When we went to the dentist they used a local anesthetic and I restrained her. They put some white gel on her teeth and dried it with a black light thing (sorry I dont know technical terms) anyway it was relatively quick and pain free. she was uncomfortable and scared but not in pain. Basically the Dentist said never give milk or juice in a sippy or bottle before babies go to sleep only water and if you can switch to sippy's with straws instead of nipples. It sounds like your little boy has the same thing!

Kate - posted on 02/27/2013

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Would love to hear what you did! My 32month old daughter has her two front teeth with decay and the dentist wants to do general anesthesia with caps as well. She breast fed until she was 18 months but we have brushed her teeth since she had any to brush!?! I cried when the dentist told me, as the thought of my daughter going under makes me want to scream!

Candice - posted on 06/17/2010

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tooth decay in kids can have more to do with their genetic disposition than anything you did wrong. They may just have weaker teeth that decay easier. It sounds like you did everything right. try not to beat yourself up about it.
as for the dentist...i really don't know. i would probably try to get another opinion.

Donnashelley - posted on 08/27/2013

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Do not !!!! please get several opinions first how bad is the damage
please do intense research on this subject.

[deleted account]

My daughter had a spot on one of her molars about 6 months ago. Like your son, my daughter didn't get soda or lots of sugar. My pediatric dentist did ask if she was getting milk and juice in a sippy cup and if we were giving her any fruit snacks. She was drinking out of a sippy cup (to save my carpet) and yes she did get fruit snacks occasionally as a treat, but the fruit juice ones from Gerber.

Well, my pediatric dentist told me to nix the sippy cups (because children drink more when they use them and therefore give bacteria a constant stream of nutrients to feed on and erode the enamel) and the fruit snacks (for the same reason, because they stick to the deep crevices (sp?) in the teeth. The crevices in her teeth are especially deep (like mine) and so they are easily prone to cavities.

We had the cavity filled. The dentist used a sedative drink (which eventually made her drowsy enough to fall asleep) and nitrous oxide and they did strap her down (for her safety), but I saved her tooth and all of the other ones she could have infected. I also had all of her teeth sealed to prevent any more issues.

The scarring from a high fever during teething is possible as well. My husband has it (his fever was during the eruption of his adult teeth) and the dentist says that it's mainly cosmetic especially since it doesn't cause him any sort of pain.

I would get as many opinions as you need to feel comfortable with your decision. The removal of teeth, especially that many, can affect his being able to eat properly, as well as the proper growth of his adult teeth. They will be more likely to grow in crooked because the baby teeth act like space holders until the new tooth can take it's place. When I was a kid, my parents couldn't afford fillings so they had both of my upper bicuspids removed. My adult bicuspids ended up growing in in the roof of my mouth because my baby teeth shifted and closed the space where my bicuspids were.

Wow, I wrote you a book :) I hope this info helps you with your decision. There are many choices to be made with many outcomes. Try to think all of them through with the benefits and consequences of each.

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Cale - posted on 03/18/2013

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Nichole,
It sounds like your son may have Enamel Hypoplasia (a condition in which tooth enamel doesn't develop the way it should have) High fevers etc. when young (usually under age 3) can be the cause. Ravi- tooth decay is not ALL about diet in EVERY CASE. There are other things that cause tooth decay. My nephew was just diagnosed with Enamel Hypoplasia. For more detailed information visit this informational website on the condition:
http://m.wisegeek.org/what-is-enamel-hyp...

Many blessings to you Nichole!

Rajat - posted on 03/05/2013

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My son is 3 and has slight tooth decay and our pediatrician said that just wait for the tooth to fall and new teeths to come - apart from that just brush regularly twice a day - thats it.

Ravi - posted on 10/01/2012

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Tooth decay is ABOUT DIET – the consumption of grains, seed oils, and refined sugars is clearly shown in Dr Weston Prices work form 80 years ago! We STOPPED AND HEALED our 1 year olds tooth decay in 3 months with diet changes and proper supplementation –



We STOPPED AND REVERSED the VERY SAME ISSUE in our child - here is our story and these are the dietary changes YOU MUST CONSIDER to stop all tooth decay (in YOU too):



The “Teeth-Rotting Diet” It’s What’s For YOUR Lunch?

http://daiasolgaia.com/?p=2826



Healing Tooth Decay: Cod Liver Oil/Butter, Xylitol, Spry Gel & Tooth Powder

http://daiasolgaia.com/?p=74



Please start advising people that the food they eat is KEY – along with proper dental care.



Ravi Wells

Daiasolgaia

Don’t go back to sleep…

Alanna - posted on 08/08/2012

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My 2.5 year old son just had his top 2 teeth pulled and I feel HORRIBLE! The dentist said he couldn't save them and I wanted to get a Second opinion but my husband convinced me that it was probably the bet thing to do. Now I am just regretting it and stressed out big time. He is fine, he can talk fine and eat and drink fine but I am most worried about his adult teeth which the dentist insisted was not going to be a problem. I just keep running it through my head wondering why I didn't follow my gut instinct to get another opinion. My husband still thinks it was the best but I feel differently. I can't go back and change it... And I just feel awful :(

Rosemary - posted on 06/10/2012

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My son turns 2 on the 16th June and I noticed that his bottom molar was decaying, so we took him to the dentist and they are not sure because he wouldn't open his mouth up enough, but they think that the whole 4 of them are decayed, but the rest of his teeth look fine. He is due to go into hospital in 3 days to be put to sleep so they can have a good look at his teeth and hopefully can fill them, but if not they will have to pull the 4 of his molars out! I really hope they can save them. He also has deep indentations so I guess the food and drink would get caught in there easily. I felt so devastated and ashamed when I found out, such a failure as I have 4 other older children who haven't had this problem. He hasn't gone to sleep drinking since he was one year old when I weaned him off his formula.

A. Ross - posted on 02/25/2012

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Okay, my son who is 21 months old has decay on his front 4 teeth.

My 7 year old had the same problem when he was the same age. The dentist at that time pulled out his teeth OMG, it was the worse.

Now I am dealing with the same decaying issue with my 21 month old like I stated above. I do want him to be put to sleep for a capping. Does anyone have any advice or other options besides using anestheia?????

Elizabeth - posted on 07/31/2011

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Ask about dentinogenesis (sp?). I had it as a child and it caused my teeth to be very soft, as there was NO dentin or enamel on my teeth. It is a genetic disorder, and it is the dominant gene. It looks like my son has it also. His teeth are a grayish color. We may have to have all of his teeth capped. Next month we go to find out. Good luck to you!

Elizabeth - posted on 07/21/2011

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I had a friend when I was a kid who got decay because she was on antibiotics (at least, that's what the doctors said - she too was meticulous with her hygiene). They can mess with the balance of your natural gut bacteria, so you need to replace them with things like yoghurt as well as do the brushing and flossing. I'm not certain what else to look out for after good hygiene and healthy eating. Maybe a calcium deficiency, but I have to tell you - I don't know and am not a medical doctor/dentist. Didn't the dentists you visited tell you what else could have caused it?

Kristy - posted on 07/21/2011

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Sometimes it can be genetics. My hubby has very fragile teeth, even though he brushes 3 times a day and has done so all his life. His teeth brake and chip very easily. His father had full dentures by the time he was 27yrs old. My concern is that my 3 yr old will be the same, so I'm constantly checking his teeth for cavities and chipping.

Teresa - posted on 07/14/2011

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Some people are genetically predisposed to "bad teeth". My son gets spots, that his genersl dentist will call cavities and when we got to the pediartic dentist he just seals them and we have no more problems. I had my teeth seled at 17 and have not had a cavity since. You do need to get those bad teeth out because they can affedt his permanent teeth.

Dana - posted on 07/13/2011

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My 2 1/2 year old son has 4 front teeth that have decayed they look hideous and I feel terrible. We brush morning and night and use tooth mousse, and they just keep on decaying. I feel sorry for him everytime he smiles. :( we have just booked him in to have the four teeth removed, its a horrible feeling but it has to be done. .I cant imagine what he actually feels when he has hot or cold foods or drinks.

Shelia - posted on 06/20/2010

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A friend of the family had to have her two year old's teeth pulled. She got to where she could not eat, the teeth absessed and the child was in a great deal of pain. She had another child that had to have all their teeth pulled as well. I believe it was hereditary. Good luck!

Liz - posted on 06/18/2010

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The only advice I can give is DO NOT go for the "sedative" procedure. Giving a child a sedative is not enough for pulling 8 teeth.

Even if you find out they really do need to be pulled, that "sedative/papoose" thing is bullshit.

Jessica - posted on 06/16/2010

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If you are taking care of his teeth like that I would look into other options as you are. Is there a family history of dental problems? My mom had something that caused her teeth to die by the time she was 35, my sister has it as well.
I would also talk to your pediatrician about the possiblity of there being some sort of mineral deficiancy that may be affecting his bone and tooth health.

Lisbeth - posted on 06/15/2010

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If he did have high fevers then it might be that to enamel didn't develop which would show up on an x-ray. My daughter had this it is like brown lines across here teeth and you can even feel then indents of the missing enamel. It is brown but it doesn't hurt her, is your son in pain that you can tell if not it really might be that, my dentist told me as long as it is kept clean and there are no apses in the gums right above the teeth that they were fine. I would get another opinion.

Nichole - posted on 06/15/2010

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he did get fevers when teething; but my boyfriend has seen the xrays and, according to him, they show the decay inside the tooth... i just don't want to put my baby in unneccesary pain...and i really want to save his teeth.

Lisbeth - posted on 06/15/2010

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Just question did he have any high fevers while his teeth were coming in if so this happened to my daughter it is not decay but that the enamel was stunned it gave her brown marks on her teeth but it wasn't too bad so it doesn't hurt her and as soon as they fall out her adult teeth will be fine. I would get as many opinions as you feel like to make sure as he is so little.

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