ADHD, Bipolar, Severe Dyslexia, Mild Mental Retardation, IQ 58...Can kids with this go beyond 6th grade?

Breanna - posted on 06/04/2011 ( 4 moms have responded )

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My son got diagnosed with ADHD, Bipolar, Severe Dyslexia, Mild Mental Retardation, IQ 58 and for his IQ he is severely behind...Anyone have a child Mild Mental Retardation or a similar IQ, who learned through high school and got a standard high school diploma? What did you have to do? My understanding is that the expectation is that IQ will limit academic understanding and they won't pass 6th grade...Should 7th and higher a reachable expectation for some?...Of course, I will encourage my son to reach his full potential what ever that becomes, but just wondering or hoping to find someone who surpassed these expectations with their child. Also, his tutoring school said that once my son's academics goes up, so will his IQ, the doctor totally disagrees, so I am wondering did this happen to your child?...Thanks and God Bless!

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Breanna - posted on 02/14/2012

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Oh am my reply on my initial post about going beyond the 6th grade I meant being able to learn regular education level beyond 6th grade. In florida, the child can stay in school till 22! :-)

Iridescent - posted on 02/14/2012

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I'm sorry you didn't get a response before! Regardless of whether he has a huge list of diagnoses or one of autism only, or somewhere in the middle, there is always a purpose of continuing education at least until 18 or 21. IQ is a funny thing. I'll explain it a bit.



IQ of 100 at age 3 is average. The range is 85-115 for norm, and people fall above and below as well, but average is still 100. That IQ is based on what the child knows and understands, or how their mind works, in various areas at that age compared to other children that age.



Now the child is age 5. If a child had some areas of concern at age 3 (IQ 85 let's say) and nobody worked with them, and they didn't learn, so the child has the exact same capabilities as they did at age 3, the test will no longer show an IQ of 85. It will now possibly show an IQ of 65. Is the child less intelligent? Not at all! But the bar is raised every year, and their ability didn't raise with their peers, so it looks like they lost intelligence. Average is still 100, but now it's compared to other 5 year olds, not 3 year olds. It goes up every single year until adulthood.



An IQ is simply a measure of how a person compares to their peers in thought process. It really isn't a perfect indicator of how they'll do with survival skills at all. It's like saying a student that isn't book smart is not intelligent, when in fact they may be the most charismatic person and know how to do things nobody else could imagine, such as play music professionally or be a chef. Yet people with high IQ's struggle with charisma and life skills as a general rule! So do not allow a number in any area tell you the hopes for your child. Do use it to get services to assist them when you can, but don't let it hinder them.



Last thing about IQ - it tends to be pretty stable, but it is not always so. It's simply a measure of how a person compares with their same aged peers. As a general rule, a person will stay at the same amount (curve) as they age, the same as a growth chart for height and weight, but it can drop or go up too as they age. This is the purpose of therapy.



A better indicator of ability is GAF score. It's safety knowledge compared to peers, and things that are useful in life, and how much assistive care is needed day to day if any. This is likely on some of your Autism paperwork for your child. Again, it isn't set in stone. Continuing with education while it is available is nearly always the best way to allow someone who is struggling especially to catch up. This is why many special education plans allow free education through age 21 instead of age 18 - it gives 3 extra years to catch up and learn skills to live. I hope this helps.

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Breanna - posted on 02/14/2012

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Thanks for the information. My son's IQ has been tested 3 times. At 5 it resulted at 77, at 9 years old it was 58 and at 10 it was 91.



I am not so worried about the IQ results, it didn't really change anything for us. Simply let me know that someone else can see that something is getting in the way of him catching up. It still didn't really tell me what that something is could it be brain damage from birth...It was all a guess as to why and the labels kept becoming more. I think for most of his life I have been trying to fix him and when I was told he was autistic suddenly I realized all this time I was trying to fix what wasn't broken.



One psychologist that got the 58 IQ made a remark that my son is way behind in areas compared to his peers and that reaching past 6th grade academics likely won't happen. It put me in quite a panic. What did that mean for his future? Will he be able to live independently? His behaviors can be very strong/violent, will he even be able to live with me...I felt like I became even more desperate to fix him...not understanding why all these years of therapy and special help with academics never seemed to be enough and finding the right help academically who can also manage/handle his behavior is about impossible. When I was told by our in home therapist that he was Autistic, for me this was the best news ever...Finally, I can accept this as part of my son...Of course, I always have and do love him and have a bond with him and everything else that goes a long with being a mom, but now I can see his moments as autistic moments and not a crisis that needs more intensive therapy or a medicine adjustment. So, in my previous post what I meant when I said nevermind he is Autistic is that I am not panicing anymore; I am not desperate for someone to have that missing piece to my puzzle. Like I feel like, everything is ok now and his autistic moments are just that. Of course, I will continue therapy (and he loves his therapist) and do all that I can for him academically and in his life, but now I can start spending "some" time focusing on my dreams and goals. All this time I have felt like I have put me and my needs on hold to fix my son. "Autism" for me gives me the feeling that everything is as it should be for my son. It also lets me know that I am willing to do whatever it takes for my son based on my actions. And I realize how far away I am to my own true potential and I am excited about my own future and dreams.

Breanna - posted on 02/09/2012

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Nevermind on the above post...my child has been diagnosed as autistic officially...so most of those labels now just go away.

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