Cognitive disorder

April - posted on 01/21/2009 ( 6 moms have responded )

30

25

1

My step daughter was diagnosed with a cognitive disorder. I asked for an explanation in detail but all they could tell me was most (95%) of the time her brain and thought process is that of someone who is at least 5-6 years younger than her actual age she is 13. When my step son was diagnosed with FAS and ADHDD i could find information on it. Read about it and go to support groups to understand and know what to do with him. It was a releif when we found out. But with my step daughter there was no releif and no explanation. any ideas anyone? Her outbursts and her violent behavior are driving us nuts. Not to mention the temper tantrums a 5 year old would have!!!

This conversation has been closed to further comments

6 Comments

View replies by

Summer - posted on 12/09/2011

35

15

1

Has anyone heard of a cognative disorder in a 3 year old that seems to know what you are saying but is behind somewhat in speech and potty training? HOwever, she is learning new words every week and knows alot of things....

Angela - posted on 01/27/2009

4

1

1

You step-daughter sounds like my daughter Ashley...she is 9 but has seizures and is DD, she has "temper tantrums" with her seizures and was not day potty trained until October 2008 (still isn't at night). They put her in a regular 3rd grade classroom but with a "helper" and she also gets pulled out so many hours per week for special-ed services. We went through a neurologist and a medical genetics doctor for testing and help with the school system. She might also be helped by therapy, all of my kids see an outpatient psychiatrist for couseling, and Ashley also has a couselor at school in the building if they need help controlling her.

Angela - posted on 01/27/2009

4

1

1

You step-daughter sounds like my daughter Ashley...she is 9 but has seizures and is DD, she has "temper tantrums" with her seizures and was not day potty trained until October 2008 (still isn't at night). They put her in a regular 3rd grade classroom but with a "helper" and she also gets pulled out so many hours per week for special-ed services. We went through a neurologist and a medical genetics doctor for testing and help with the school system. She might also be helped by therapy, all of my kids see an outpatient psychiatrist for couseling, and Ashley also has a couselor at school in the building if they need help controlling her.

April - posted on 01/22/2009

30

25

1

The thing that pisses me off so much is that they don't tell you how to deal with it. Like my step son we had no idea what was going on with him until i had him tested. He came back with FAS and ADHDD. I looked it up talked to doctors and found some peace in how to respond to him and what his needs were, and still are. My step daughter on the other hand, we don't know how to help her cause we dont know where the spectrum is know what i mean? Like where is the balance?

Angela - posted on 01/21/2009

4

1

1

I have three special needs children, among the other phisical problems - they have all been diagnosed with ADHD, OCD, ODD, speech delay issues, emotional/behavioral issues, developmental delay and are on the autism spectrim. My oldest also has receptive/expresive language delay. My 12 year old takes Zoloft and Seroquel in the morning and Seroquel and Melatonin at night, the 9 and 5 year olds take Seroquel in the morning and Seroquel and Melatonin at night to sleep. I have learned that the better they sleep(hence the Melatonin)the better they act in the morning and the Seroquel(and Zoloft)help with the mood swings. My two boys(12 & 5) are on Concerta and my daughter(9) is on Strattera and the Daytrona patch. These help with the ADHD, OCD, and ODD.



I know that "cognitive disorder" is kinda like "developmental delay"...maybe you could find out more on the internet "google"ing that subject...



I found this,



Cognitive disorders are mental conditions characterized by impaired awareness, perception, reasoning, memory and judgment. Patients with these disorders have difficulty with the basic process of thinking.



Cognition is the act of mentally processing information. Memory and thought combine to store, retrieve and manipulate this information. When something goes wrong with an individual’s memory or thought processes, a cognitive disorder may result. Problems with memory, orientation, language, information processing, and the ability to focus or finish a task are all characteristic of cognitive disorders.



 



Other symptoms that may be present in those who have cognitive disorders include:





Inability to concentrate

Memory problems

Hallucinations and delusions

Altered sensation or perception

Altered sleep patterns

Motor system impairment

Speech difficulties

Disorientation

Personality or emotional changes

Difficulty paying attention or following instructions



I hope this helps :) 

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms