Dealing with a child diagnosed with bipolar. It is very hard and heart breaking.

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Sharon - posted on 04/29/2009

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hi there, my daughter as sychiza-affective disorder she was sectioned on a section 3 when she was just 14, no one actually realized she was ill at first she was thought to be just a naughty child although we still never got any help! they did actually think she had bipolar at first( as symptoms are extremely similar) but anyway to cut it short she was in hospital over 3 yrs but is now living independently in the comunity and is at the moment stable! its thought that she also had adhd autism and behaviour problems! its just so sad that no one recognised this earlier despite the request of help from myself on several occasions but all well that ends well! plz feel free to ask me anything or advise me in any way you think this could help you or anyone else! Sharon

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Amy - posted on 10/18/2009

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Oh I got the he is too young and even by his counselor who said he was too young to hear voices yet he was,she too also said he was doing fine and wanted to discharge him..for petes sake he is bipolar he needs help for the rest of his life..I have heard it all as many of us have.....curious to all what meds are your kids on?Mine is on 4 mg of Risperdal a day and 50 mg of trazadone a day for sleeping.He was on 150 mg of dival proex but it made him gain alot of weight so after 5 months put a halt to that..

Kandy - posted on 10/18/2009

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I really thought I was alone in this disorder. Everyone kept telling me I was to blame for him being this way, I spoiled him to much or babied him. I was even told that by a teacher at a very well to do private school.( he no longer goes there). Or my favorite is that he is to young to have bipolar. Or he is just a bad seed. This site makes me feel like there is hope out there for my son. He is not a bad seed, he is a very smart ,loving boy.Whom I adore with all my heart. I just need SOMEONE else to give a damn about him and help me help him.

Amy - posted on 10/17/2009

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Labeling is good it gives your child a chance to get the help they need.I get the benefit for my son but it also makes me feel abetter knowing that if things get too bad for him he has that to fall back on as an adult..he wants to be a Chef which me scares due to knives and such..I would rather people know who my child is and Bipolar is who he is not what he has.he can't help it but I don't like people thinking he is a bad kid when he can't control certain things..He has 2 sides,one awesome and one evil and he can't do anything about it.

Kathy - posted on 10/06/2009

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All the thanks goes to you. I just found out about the bipolar yesterday, and my mind was reeling. I came on here to see if anyone had any experience with this- and there you were. The term bipolar is just that- a term. He's still the same great kid- now we know what's going on- we can help. I hope this is the last piece of his puzzle. For 15 he's already had more go on than most of the people we know do in their entire lives. i really just want him to be care free again like he was before he had all his medical issues the last 6 years..... anyway- i digress. Thank you for reaching out.

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SSI is different, i fought for 5 years and my daughters finally went through. I know how you feel it is a constant battle. I love my little girl, I just wish that people did not look at her as always the one in trouble...especially at school. I have a great doctor, I would not trade him for the world, people just do not understand.. Her normal is normal. Good luck, and it is nice to know that there are parents out there to talk to, Thank you very much!!

Kathy - posted on 10/06/2009

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My son is 15 & a little over a year ago he startd to have a lot of constant behavior issues at school and though we didn't see them at home at school it was bad enough they removed him. so after a long legal battle and finally getting evaluated ,He was diagnosed as Mod. Autistic, and after a long search was placed at a private school that could handle all. Then the behaviors started again. He's big for his age, and though typically gentle when these behaviors happened it was like jekyle and hyde.( again associated with school only.) So my son's new doctor talked to the school, and now thinks that he's bipolar too. He says sometimes they can go hand in hand (autism/bipolar). He's already on the right meds protocal has been for years, but needs to have one new one added and we are hopeful that it will help him . The school seems to think that this will be a miracle pill= who knows. I am encourage after reading stories here- that once we get the right mix- he'll have a more normal life. He also has a rare chromosome disorder (he has global delays, speech delays, mild mr )and will be pretty much dependent for life. I have been told to apply for SSI, which I did when he was little- then Soc. Sec said we incomed out. Now I have people telling me to try for disability from Soc. Sec. Isn't it the same as SSI ? I'm confused.

Sharon - posted on 10/04/2009

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My daughter was diagnosed with Bipolar 10 years ago when she was 15. Thank goodness, there was an IEP in place. I learned that meds for bipolar aren't like meds for the cold. It takes awhile for efficacy and correct cocktail of meds. School my daughter went to in Duval County Florida worsened her condition. Eventually, we resorted to SED, hospital homebound, and finally used McKay Scholarship to go to a private school. Are you active with NAMI? www.nami.org. NAMI has a wonderful class called Family to Family.

Michelle - posted on 07/13/2009

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yes my daughter has been on risperdal for a month now and she is finally sleeping a little better. before she was staying up until whenever and would get up early. Right now have noticed she was not throwing as many tantrums and also not throwing hardly any items when she got mad until this past weekend.Since Fri. She has had quite a bit outbursts and threw a sit and spin at my son ( he was able to get out of the way). my husband actually saw that one. usually he is not here to see those episodes when they happen. This is the first problem she has had since she started taking the meds. I think that she needs something else with it. i am not really to sure. Right now her dad is being evaluated for either Bipolar or a mood disorder also. It is very hectic around here. He is pretty much okay right now though, thing have been calmed down with him. I am basically taking care of 3 kids instead of 2. Thanks

Karen - posted on 07/12/2009

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I am a single mom of a 12 year old boy who was diagnosed with bi-polar, ADHD,ODD and conduct disorder at age 8. It has been a long road to travel alone. He was hospitalized at age 9 for 5 weeks, it was the most difficult thing to do as he was 2 1/2 hours away from our hometown. I saw him everyday for 45 minutes though!! He has been on a truckload of meds and is now on a new combination that help but are still not 100% accurate for him. I know what I have been through and my heart goes out to everyone who is dealing with any type of mental illness in their children.

Michelle - posted on 07/12/2009

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Thank you so very much I will add that to my address book. I am new to this, but I am so relieved already just being able to connect w/ people that are going throught the same exact things that you are because usually your close family and friends are not. I do not have any family support at all, and only a few friends. Not all the time do they agree w/ the decisions I have to make but I know God is standing right behind!

Kimberly - posted on 07/12/2009

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I will keep you in my prayers and if you ever want to tlak here is my email address kherbst4@hotmail.com

Michelle - posted on 07/12/2009

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Thank you so much for the advice. I have read up on a lot of the same ideas. It is a really stressful situation here right now. My son has just finished up all of his evaluations and been diagnosed with PDD- Asperger's, and a few other disabilities. I think this fall things will get a little easier because he will be going to a Asperger's, High- Functioning Autism, & ADHD school so I will be able to calm down some from her situation. Everting started happening at the same time here in this household!

Kimberly - posted on 07/12/2009

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Sometimes it takes so long to get the right medicine. I know exactly how you feel.I have 4 sons two out of those have been diagnosed for years with bipolar and recently my third son has. The first two were young like your child and it was a very long road, but we are on the other side now. Both have graduated and are working and my one son is talking about getting married. I thought the other two were safe from the diagnosis because they are so much older but my thirteen year old just got diagnosed and it has been so hard. We forget just how truly bad this disease can be without the right meds. We are older now and the patience is not the same. Just have faith that what may not work now may work after puberty. Remember to be her best advocate especiall in school and you will need to have things in place for her in school . You may want to talk to a mental health advocate or school advocate to help you with this so she can be successful. Remind her all the famous people that deal with this disorder and don't let her get away with things because of this illness. She needs to be held accountable. If she was an adult they would hold her accountable in a court of law so start now so she starts realizing that even though this is so hard there are still consequences. It got so bad for awhile at our house we had a therapist work with us at home for a year to help 3x a week, We ended upp making his room a safe room and when he got so violent he got locked in there where he could not hurt himself or anyone else. Good Luck to you and your family!

Michelle - posted on 07/11/2009

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I have a 4 1/2 yr old daughter just recently diagnosed w/ Bipolar. She has always been an irritable child but I never thought anything of it. Then within the last year or so she was getting really bad. She was staying up really late, getting up early, throwing items, hitting, and throwing very long tantrums. My husband has always had a temper. Now he is going through evaluation for either a Mood Disorder or Bipolar. The Bipolar runs in his side of the family. It is awful what I have gone through. I knew what was coming with my daughter, but when the answer came out I had tears. She still is not stable on her meds. yet. It has only been about a month since she was diagnosed

Kimberly - posted on 05/22/2009

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I know how you feel when I look back at my sons especially the one I realize that there were many problems from toddler on that was not normal. Aaron even as an infant would not leet you put your hands or fingers on him , we had to hold him with our wrists. He hated certain types of clothes or things that were tight on him he went nuts. My sons are very intelligent to the one son his teacher says she has yet to teach a subject he doesn't know a fact that she did not even know. Aaron did have a learning disability but he is starting college this fall and we are so proud of his achievements. It's a very long road but when it finally works out the reward is unbelievable. Hope you get your rewards soon.

Laura - posted on 05/22/2009

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Trust me at this time I don not plan to remove him from having a n IEP. This is my son's third medication for his bi polar disorder and recently added adderal. And unfortunately (behavior wise) he's been yo-yoing back and forth lately so there maybe another change in his meds. However, most of my son's IEP was related to academics and the BIP Plan covers the behavior concerns. As I stated in my previous post my son aparently suffered from bipolar disorder since he was about 14 months old, he was so stuborn, sensitive and moody that he made him self developmentally delayed. He had to receive both speech and occupational therapy and even attented a special education preschool for two & 1/2 years. The actual diagnosis came when he was in kindergarten. My son however dispite his diability is a bright and wonderful boy. Some times to bright (as most bipolar children are) for his own good.

Kimberly - posted on 05/22/2009

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Bless you on your courage to do what you believe is right for your son and your family. The hell of this disese is that there is not one way to treat it that works for everyone and what may be one persons answer is not anothers.You have the courage of a hundred angels because on top of having to explain this to a hundred strangers I am almost sure you have to explain this to most of your family. It's a hard road and hopefullly must of us will come out on the other side. I know you are confused that your son does not meet the critirea of the illnesses but every person is different and does not have all the symptoms . Children are especially hard to fit into that diagnosis list of symptoms. Childrens depression usuallly comes out in rages and anger. My second son had so much rage and anger and it has left a lasting effect on my other children. His maniac episodes where so intent and coupled with the fact we can not treat the ADHD because the meds bring on maniac episodes. It is very time consuming dealing with him. I will keep you and your family in my prayers.

Kimberly - posted on 05/22/2009

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Please be careful removing your son from his IEP , you never know when meds stop working ,need to be adjusted and things that work now may not work when he goes into puberty. His IEP protects him in school and also can carry on into college.He will need these things to help him, He does not need to be in special ed to have an IEP my one son was in mainstream classes all through school with an IEP . If he no longer meets the requirements for an IEP then he need to have a 504 plan put in place. Be very careful before removing an help he may need later. Did you know as he meets goals on his IEP new goals are supposed to be added?

Renee - posted on 05/22/2009

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I don't know how this will be taken, but I am going to put myself out there anyway. We have known there was something wrong with our son since he was about a yr old. We had him tested by many doctors, many facilities. After years of being sent from place to place, with being accused of being a "bad parent" (why then are my other 3 children ok?) to being in denial of any problem that "parenting classes" couldn't cure, it was finally at one of these "parenting classes" that he went ballistic violently tearing the place apart and having the police called. He was 7 yrs old. That was the first of a total of 12 hospitalizations. He has been diagnosed with bipolar, PDD-NOS, Mood Disorder Nos, and a gazzillion other diagnosises. We don't believe he is any one of those. He doesn't fit the mold of any of those disorders and we are still fighting to get him properl assesed. (he is 11 now) Right before Christmas last year, he was placed in a group home and in a special school that is equipped to properly manage his violence. Why would I allow this? He was dangerous. To us, to himself, and to his classmates. He was tried in 3 different programs that our county office of ed had in place for "Emotionally Disturbed" children. He was unsuccessful in any of these places. He is doing very well at the group home. We are lucky that he is only 45 minutes away. he comes home for an overnight pass every weekend. My husband and I have gone and volunteered at the group home to help my son and the other 5 boys that live there. Do NOT get me wrong. We love him. He has been a huge blessing in our lives. We have learned so much from him. It finally came to a point that for my other children's safety and for ours that he not live here. My 9 yr old son was afraid to go to sleep at night. My daughter would cower in a corner when he acted up in order to protect herself. We know "good parents" probably think that we gave up....or are "bad parents" but we know, as do our friends,and families. We hope he will be able to come home eventually, although that doesn't sound like it will be in the near future. He may never come home, and he may never be able to live on his own...we don't know, but we are committed and prepared to provide whatever we can to ensure he has as productive and able life as possible. As far as SSI, thank heaven for it. We have been able to get him services and supportive devices we never would have been able to afford with out it Right now we are saving to take him to the Amen Clinic. At $3400 there is no way that we could pay for that ourselves, so in about 6 months...hopefully we can take him with the SSI money. See, we use his "disability" money to improve his life....not to just get "free handouts" from the government. We pay our taxes too.



After reading the above, I realize it sounds a bit harsh, and maybe a bit "whiney". Believe me it isn't intended that way, it just ruffles my feathers when I have to defend my parenting decisions to others day in and day out. I didn't mean to offend anyone and I apologize in advance if that is how it comes across. I think every parent with a special needs child has a special mansion in heaven. It is a difficult ride at times, but the scenery can be so beautiful. The rewards....without measure. God Bless each of you as you take care of your children in the best way possible for you, them and your families. Good Luck!!

Laura - posted on 05/21/2009

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My son was diagnosed with bipolar disorder when he was 5 1/2. Based on test and going over his history; we deduced that he has suffered from the disorder since he was about 2 year old. He was very stubborn and extemely difficult to deal with even as a young toddler. When he was younger we had to communicate with sign language because he actually refused to talk, It's not that he couldn't he just didn't want to. He has strange "rituals" and had some repeatative behaviors. He used to get very violent when things didn't go his way and somethime would get very sullen at the slightest disappointment. At first his diagnosis was bipolar disorder along with Oppositional Defiant Disorder but has since been coupled with ADD. When he first started medication (Risperidal) he gain 45lbs in a very short period of time and became extremly unhappy with himself. The more he was unhappy with himself the more angry he became. Finally a doctor became extemely concern with his weight gain and we changed his medication and he is lost most of the weight that he gained. He is getting ready to celebrate his 8th birthday this Saturday, every day though remains a struggle and trying to keep the peace has me labled a spoiler and that I still baby him. I don't thing that he's spoiled nor do I baby him, I attempt to keep peace and try to help him avoid getting in trouble when he doesn't seem to know why he's mad or upset about. My son is a bright student, but his behavior gets in the way of his school work. At times he can become fustrated or fixated on what he wants to do and not pay attention to lessons in class. At least we are able to keep him in regular education class and the list of goals on his IEP keeps getting shorter and shorter. Hopefully and with luck we will be able to eliminate his IEP all together. Special Education doesn't think so because he has a BIP Plan (behavior only) but at least next year he doesn't need to be in an inclusion (main stream) class. We still have a long way to go, behavior still gets in the way, poor decision making but it can be done. Therapy helps its not enough to give medication. Medication doesn't control behaviors. I have learned that with my son he is able to learn ways to self sooth and to slow down and make good choices. I have found myself in and out of therapy, things will go smooth and then bumpy and then smooth again. Its a daily process but one we can get though.

Karen - posted on 05/21/2009

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I'm afraid that you just have to take it one day at a time. I have a 21year old with bipolar. Meds have really helped her, but its been an uphill battle.

Kimberly - posted on 05/18/2009

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I am so glad you had the strength and determination to get your daughter the help she needed. I know how hard that was for you We at one time or another had to hospitalize both of our sons , one had several admissions. It was the hardest things I have ever done I can only imagine how hard it was to do it for 66 mths but sometimes you are right you have to let someone else take over and look at things from fresh eyes and fresh views. I will pray for your daughter and you and hope she continues on the patth she is on.

Kristi - posted on 05/18/2009

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I am a mother of 4 wonderful girls. My oldest who is 12 started acting out about the age of 8. for 3 years we tried to help her taking to see doctors and therapy, all they every told us was she has ADHD. Then she started to have rage and cried all the time at the age of 10 she was leaving the house at 5 in the morning, but age 11 it got so bad I got fearful for her sisters, she would rage out and try to hit us or her sisters. she would try to hurt her self she even pulled all her hair out on one side of her head. I then gave up on her doctors and started looking for a place get help. I look in to hopsital after hopsital and could not see how a mother could leave their child in the care of these places. After 6 month of looking I found a private placement center on 40 mins away. Our insurance only paid half so we took all our 401k out to pay the rest. Well it was the hardest thing I VERY had to do. I felt like I let her down by sending her there but with in a month we know it was not just ADHD!!!! She is bipolar with sensory disorder and mild schizo-affective disorder, it took 6 months to find the right meds for her and going to see her 4 times a week was hard knowing I could not bring my baby home yet.. But she has been home 8 months now and things are better. we still deal with the moods and her picking at herself, she still has rage but nothing like it was she has learned tricks to calm her self and knows when she needs to step back and take a few to get under control. So for all you family's who are going throw this I pray you find the answers you need, sometimes letting someone else take over is best. My baby still see 3 doctors a week and well have to always be on meds but she young and we all have a understanding of what is happening, she will be the first to tell you she is glad we got help she hated feeling out of control....She has a changes at a good life because we found it early and she can grow with this and learn things to help her control herself...

Kimberly - posted on 05/18/2009

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How do people know your friends are diabled ? I'm sure you have filled out applications I have never seen them ask if you recieve disability. They may ask if there is a disability that would make have a hard time with this job and you just answer no. Once they hire you they would have to say its because of you receiving disability to fire you and then it becomes a legal issue. I fully understand you wanting the best for your son now and in the future but sometimes you have to think that he may need help when he is older if his mood disorder is bad and you are making sure he has money in place so he does not end up homeless. What if something happened to you , how can he survive now, where does he go, how does he manage? I know you hate to think about these things but for our kids especially you can't leave things up to fate and us wanting everything to be "normal " for them. I am glad you have strong convictions about supporting him yourself but I hope that you aren't so determined you can do this without help that you make it harder on both of you. Sometimes when just one pressure is gone it helps the situation more then words can say. Only you know what is right for you and your son .You have made the right decisions so far and have got him where he is now,so I am sure you will continue to make the right decisions for your family. Just remember what options you have if you need them.

Shannon - posted on 05/17/2009

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Quoting Kimberly:

Shannon I have a friend whose child is a shaken baby victim. She feels the same way you are about the label disabled and I am going to tell you what I told her. It is only a word, How you raise your child and teach them to accept their problems is how they will learn to do it., but if you treat them disabled then they will be. That money and services that are availabe through SSI can open alot of closed doors for you. My sons who are bipolar are on SSI . We didn't even tell them until they were 18. We taught them they could do anything they wanted to and only they could stop theirselves. We taught them not to accept I can't . My second son was in the lowest special ed class , we were told he would never learn to read,,write, or do math.I wouldn't accept it and I made the school push him and refused to let them pawn him off to a behavior school. He is now graduating next week, passed 3 of the Graduation requirement test even though he did not have to take them, and is enrolled to start college in the fall. There are numerous programs available to him and funding for school because he is disabled . He can read, write ,has a checking account and even a drivers permit., all because he knows he just has to work harder than most but he can still do it.Please accept the help that is out there one door usually opens another and you never know what door will help the most. Good Luck to you both.


My problem with labeling is I know of two people who where put on disability by their parents so they could receive that extra money. Now those two have had a hard time as adults with this "label". It just seems that people cant look past that disability when it comes to them finding work, getting loans, life insurance, etc...it just seems like many doors are being shut in their faces because they are considered disabled. Its not fair because they are fully capable of doing the same things as everyone else. But people see diabled as worthless. They have been told several times in a round about way that it was because of thier disability. I know that their are rules out there that are supposed to protect them from dthis iscrimination. But these "people in charge" can find loop holes or lie when confronted to protect themselves. And they are every where in this world. The idea of doing this to my child scares me. I want to provide the best that I can for my child. Im constantly afraid that something I do now will harm him later. But one of the things I refuse to let him do is try and blame his problem for not doing what is right. I let him know that he can do anything he wants to in life if he works for it.

Ivette - posted on 05/17/2009

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yes it is but once u can get into how to focus on certain needs that they have it becomes better i've dealt with it for 16 years it's not easy but the hard work pays off

Kimberly - posted on 05/17/2009

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Shannon I have a friend whose child is a shaken baby victim. She feels the same way you are about the label disabled and I am going to tell you what I told her. It is only a word, How you raise your child and teach them to accept their problems is how they will learn to do it., but if you treat them disabled then they will be. That money and services that are availabe through SSI can open alot of closed doors for you. My sons who are bipolar are on SSI . We didn't even tell them until they were 18. We taught them they could do anything they wanted to and only they could stop theirselves. We taught them not to accept I can't . My second son was in the lowest special ed class , we were told he would never learn to read,,write, or do math.I wouldn't accept it and I made the school push him and refused to let them pawn him off to a behavior school. He is now graduating next week, passed 3 of the Graduation requirement test even though he did not have to take them, and is enrolled to start college in the fall. There are numerous programs available to him and funding for school because he is disabled . He can read, write ,has a checking account and even a drivers permit., all because he knows he just has to work harder than most but he can still do it.Please accept the help that is out there one door usually opens another and you never know what door will help the most. Good Luck to you both.

Shannon - posted on 05/17/2009

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It is very hard and heartbreaking. But at the same time when I look at my son my heart explodes with love and pride. My oldest son, who is 13, is bipolar, ADHD, PTSD, social anxiety. He struggles every day but instead of letting it make him full of hate, his heart bursts with love. He gives me more strength then I ever thought possible. He is my role model. I also am bipolar. So I know what he is going through.

I too have been told repeatedly to put him on disability. I refuse. I refuse to let him think that even I, his mother, thinks that he is not capable of wonderful things. Yeah I could use that check, but not at the expense of my child. The way I look at it is, it is my job to support him through all of this, but if I label him as disabled then he will think that of himself and stop trying. I wont give up on him.

You would also be surprised at how many times I have heard that I need to put him in a home. That it would be easier for my family. No, I would be robbing them of an important learning experience. Just because my son has problems doesnt make him any less my son, my family. So putting him in a home would just be tearing the family apart, not making it stronger.

In some ways I feel lucky that I have experienced this. Not that I am happy that I have to watch my son suffer. But because when a family has something to fight for it brings them together. We are stronger and closer then most people in the "normal" world are. We know that we are not alone and that no matter what we will get through it together. And that's what makes life worth living.

Good luck and god bless. Remember you were given a treasure that will bring you a whole new understanding to the meaning of life. It wont always be easy, but it wont always be hard either.

Kathy - posted on 05/04/2009

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I have 5 adopted children. 3 are bipolar. I completely agree that they have their moments (sometimes all at the same time). I am trying to keep things as stable as possible and I am trying my best to be a good mom to them. It's really hard to deal with it sometimes, but I just breath and go on to the next day.

Thank you all for being here as a support group. I haven't ever been on something like this and I think it's about time that I get some support for me.

Kimberly - posted on 05/04/2009

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I have four boys and three now have bipolar and other secondary problems. It was devasting when the third was diagnosed. Even though the road has been long and very rocky we are seeing light. The one that will take meds is graduating this year working part time and going to college in the fall. the one that won't take meds is at least working part tme and we keep hoping he will start meds someday. My thirteen year old we are still looking for meds that will work and kids are very cruel but we have hope he will come out on the other side. They sure don't tell you all this when you are praying for 10 fingers and toes who know you had to pray for their world not to be shattered by this. As my one son said when the other got idagnosed recently " ya he can have a normal life but it ishell to get there this bipolar make your life screwed up"

Robin - posted on 05/02/2009

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Bernadine,

My heart goes out to you and your family. Bi-polar is no fun. I live it every day. Fortunately, after years of feeling like a guinnea pig, I am finally on the medications that work for me. I understand what your son is going through. I am sure you are a great mom... you have been seeking help for him. Keep up the good work. And keep giving hugs to him, well if he lets you, afterall, he is 15.

Kelli - posted on 05/02/2009

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my son is 4 years old. at age 2 he was diagnosed as autistic with dyssomina and a n.o.s. mood disorder. at age 4 they finally diagnosed his mood disorder at emerging bipolar. and is autisim is now high functioning autism by diagnosis. he still is labeled with dyssomnia and has a sensory disorder. dealing with the bipolar was different when it was actually my child. a large majority of my family is bipolar and so is a few in my husbands family. so i have experience with mental illnesses but when it was my child my first thought was oh noo! i cried. i have seen the effects of the illness and yes it is bad but there is help available and as a parent you learn patience. with out that you will have alot of problem for yourself and take it out on you child. i have done alot of research to try to understand alittle about what is goin on in my sons mind since he has alot of disorders. it has been a fight trying to get him the help he needs but i will never stop trying to get him the best help i can and i will never give up. my jaxxy has taught me alot in 4 years. i fully believe that God blessed me with him to teach me that even though the world doesn't think he is "normal" or the "perfect child" he is my child and really with our world...WHAT IS NORMAL. normal is in the eye of the beholder. and i have developed thick skin. with haveing a child that has alot of mental issues it is a requirement that does come in time.

Barbara - posted on 04/29/2009

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I agree with Meredith. Educate yourself on what you can do to make his life the best it can be. There are so many alternative solutions to meds that you can do. If you want to look into a nutritional approach let me know. Many people have had great results by using certain combination of supplements.



All my best to you and your son.



Barbara Formica

Meredith - posted on 04/29/2009

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My 10 year old son was diagnosed with Bipolar disorder last year. It was heart breaking as I felt responsible as I too have the diagnosis. I became as informed about bipolar disorder as anyone could. I read and researched everything from behavior modification to medication. I found out that the more informed I was as a parent the better I was equipped to advocate for my son when the doctors just wanted to give pills, pills, and more pills. You as a parent are the best advocate for your child and don't have your child "labeled" as that will follow him for the rest of his life...I know from experience. Some days are hard and some are ok but they are gifts from God and He will give you all you need to deal with bad days and cherish the good ones.

Bernadine. - posted on 04/29/2009

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Maria thank you so much for you reply. My children are my world and I will never give up on my son. He is a very smart young man. Like your father he has some bad times and some very bad, but he is truely a loving, kind, sweet 15-year-old boy. I have had several people tell me I need to have him placed on disability. I will not. He can and will have a normal life and I am not going to label him in that way just for a darn check. I always tell myself the good Lord will not give me more than i can handle. Once again thank you so very much for you comments, they truely help me see the light at the end of the tunnell.

Maria - posted on 04/28/2009

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I do not have a child diagnosed bipolar. But I wanted to tell you that my father was bipolar. When he was a child they didn't have medicine or therapy or understand anything about it and he grew up to be absolutely the best father in the whole wide world. He also was a very good husband, totally devoted to my mother. Yes, he had his bad times, and they could be severe, but he did really well, and he didn't even have the benefits that people today who are diagnosed with this have! He died of cancer 20 years ago, but he is still remembered fondly by everyone who knew him, coworkers, friends and family.

You may be wondering what the point of this is, and it is basically to tell you to take heart! I know you are struggling but your child can live a good life! Especially with a mother who is seeking help for her child! Good Luck!

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