My My My please let me know how?SSi questions

Val - posted on 02/28/2011 ( 17 moms have responded )

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I myself recieve ssi and my daughter has just been approved. I am a bit concerned about some stuff. I live in New Hampshire and I am wondering what happens with 14 months of my childs back pay?I get newhere with the local office. Can I use money to fix my car? Can I use it to replace things she has destraoed?Can I take her on vaction?
Also I recieve child support for the other child who is the only child who recieved schild support. Will this too be income counted when I have the interveiw to determine eligibility?I only recieve ssi 674 and child support. Not sure what income limits are.Help

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Wendy - posted on 03/02/2011

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I recently started receiving social security for my daughter. The representative that helped me set it up suggested that I open a separate account for her. It is in both of our names. Mine being first since she is under the age of 18. That way there is a paper trail that is easily accessible. I received back pay on her that was for a year and a half. I was shocked at how fast I could spend the money on her. Take your daughter on vacation, if that's what you want to do, and write it off as back rent. You already spent your money on the back rent. Hope this helps.

Jane - posted on 03/01/2011

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Social Security insisted in depositing the money into my account and refused to put it into a separate account, so you have to go move the money around if you want it in a separate account. The form I have filled out each year never asked what I spent it on, just how much I spent on the kids. Since I easily spent all that they gave me plus more I simply put down the full amount as having been spent. The one time I thought they would want to see receipts they waved them off.

Karen - posted on 03/01/2011

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At the end of each year, they ask if you spent the money and give you space to show what it was spend on. Her share of the housing is called rent(housing cost divided by number in household is her share of the rent) Keep receipts to show how it was spent. They never questioned anything I did, dental, medical, food, clothes, damages, counselling, etc. just be sure to do the paperwork on time. if you use the car to transport to appts, school(and who doesn't) car repairs are fine. Keep her money separate from yours so you can track it(separate acct with her own debit card that is in your name since you are the guardian and you use it only for expenses--that makes a good papertrail of expenses.

Iridescent - posted on 02/28/2011

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They'll go over it at the interview and send you a report of the calculations. Child support counts for that child which it is for, and for half siblings (I think), but not step siblings. You can only use the income for Food, Shelter, Clothing - necessities. This includes travel (car repairs), phone, cable, but not vacations, although food while on vacation would count. Save receipts if you have any worry about an audit!

Yvonne - posted on 02/15/2012

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The representative payee for a disabled child under age 18 who is eligible for large past–due payments (usually any payment covering more than six months of the current benefit rate) is required to open a separate account at a financial institution.



The past–due payments will be deposited directly into that "dedicated account", and the use of these funds is restricted.





What are the requirements for a dedicated account?



A dedicated account must be separate from the account used for the regular monthly benefit payment and can only be a checking, savings, or money market account.



Other funds, except for certain past–due SSI benefits, cannot be commingled with the funds in the dedicated account.



The account cannot be in the form of certificates of deposit, mutual funds, stocks, bonds, or trusts.



Title must show the child owns the funds, including interest.

How can you use the money in the dedicated account?

You can use the money only for the following expenses:





medical treatment; and



education or job skills training.

We also allow the following expenses, if they benefit the child and are related to the child's impairment:





personal needs or assistance (for example, in–home nursing care);



special equipment;



housing modification;



therapy or rehabilitation; or



other items or services approved by your local Social Security office, like legal fees incurred by the child in establishing a claim for disabled child's benefits.

You may not use these monies for basic monthly maintenance costs such as food, clothing, or shelter. You must use the regular monthly SSI benefit for the child's food, clothing, or shelter.



If there are any questions on use of the funds, contact your local Social Security office.

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Iridescent - posted on 03/02/2011

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At some point, you will have an expense which qualifies which you would need this money for. That is why it's set up as a dedicated account. It says it specifically does not count as income or a resource, and it is ONLY to contain the initial lump sum payment if it is large. For example, if OT recommends the Indoor Rainy Day Playground for a sensory disorder related to the Autism, and naturally insurance will not cover it, that's $500 well spent and a source to cover it. If she damages her room and it now requires repairs plus modifications to prevent it from happening again, here is a source to cover it. It is NOT for vacations.

Iridescent - posted on 03/02/2011

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http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html

How you must use monthly benefits

First, you must make sure the beneficiary’s day-to-day needs for food and shelter are met. Then, the money can be used for any of the beneficiary’s medical and dental care that is not covered by health insurance, and for personal needs, such as clothing and recreation. If there is money left after you pay for the beneficiary’s needs, it must be saved, preferably in an interest-bearing account or U.S. Savings Bonds.

If the beneficiary is in a nursing home or other institution, you should use the benefits to pay the usual charges for care. In this case, you should set aside a minimum of $30 each month to be used for the beneficiary’s personal needs.

Also, if the beneficiary lives in an institution and is eligible for Medicaid or is a member of a family that receives payments from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, you should contact your local Social Security office about using the beneficiary’s Social Security benefits to support the family.

As a general rule, you may not take a fee from the beneficiary’s funds for your services as a representative payee. If you have questions about this, contact your local Social Security office.

A special note about blind or disabled children receiving SSI

Sometimes, blind or disabled children will receive large, past-due SSI payments covering more than six months of benefits. Usually, these payments must go directly into a separate banking account. We call this a “dedicated account” because funds in this account may be used only for certain expenses, primarily those related to the child’s disability. The ­dedicated account must be kept separate from any other savings or checking account set up for the beneficiary. Except for certain subsequent past-due payments, no other funds may be commingled into the account, and money in the dedicated account is not countable as a resource. Interest earned on the money also is not counted as income or as a resource. Money in a dedicated account must be used only for the following expenses:

*

Medical treatment and education or job skills training;
*

Personal needs assistance related to the child’s disability—special equipment, housing modification and therapy or rehabilitation; or
*

Any other item or service related to the child’s disability that we determine to be appropriate, such as legal fees incurred in establishing the child’s claim for benefits.

You should first get approval from us for these kind of expenses.

You must keep a record of all money taken from this account and receipts for all items or services bought, because we will review these records at least once a year. If you knowingly use money from the dedicated account for anything other than the expenses shown above, you must repay us from your own funds. If you have questions about dedicated accounts, contact us.

Val - posted on 03/02/2011

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how can I tie any of this to autisum,adhd,low muscle tone.
Therapy is paid through insurance and so are meds.No wheel chair needed.she is 10 and I am cunfused.

Val - posted on 03/02/2011

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Allowed Use of Dedicated Account Funds
A payee is allowed to use dedicated account funds for:

medical treatment; and

education or job skills training.

b. Allowed Use for Expenses Related to Child's Impairment
A payee is allowed to use dedicated account funds for the following, if they benefit the child and are related to the child's impairment:

personal needs assistance;

special equipment;

housing modification;

therapy or rehabilitation; and

other items or services SSA determines appropriate.




Expenditures Not Permitted
Payment for items or services that are not listed in GN 00602.140B.3. is not permitted. Basic maintenance costs (food, housing, clothing, and personal items) not related to the child's impairment and SSI overpayments may not be paid with dedicated account funds.

Val - posted on 03/02/2011

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the person gave me a phone interveiw.She said i will mail info to you. No help!!

Jane - posted on 03/02/2011

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You need to use it on things for the kids. That includes their clothing, activities, shoes, school supplies, food, hair cuts, doctor and dentist visits, and, as people said above, their "portion" of the rent/mortgage and utilities. It adds up fast.

Val - posted on 03/02/2011

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have you used this for clothes ect?I am worried I will do it wrong. The worked is no help and sends me general info from ssi website.

Kelly - posted on 03/01/2011

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Her income can be used to pay "rent" to you and to pay for all her medical, dental, clothing, toys, food, etc. But it must be spent on her. The rent should cover her percentage of the housing cost. All of it should be in a seperate account and tracked carefully...no more than $2000 at any one time can be in her name. They will require a form at the end of the fiscal year telling about what was spent on what. You can collect rent and bills for the months they pay you in arrears. Hope this helps.

Jane - posted on 03/01/2011

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I have received SSI for myself and my kids for a number of years as my spouse was disabled. While you are supposed to use the kids' money for the kids I have never been audited. Quite frankly, I have found that it is very easy to spend the SSI full amount on the kids since they always need new shoes, school supplies, and so on. Just save all your receipts for anything kid-related.

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