Sensory Processing Disorder

Sarah - posted on 11/05/2008 ( 56 moms have responded )

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My 2 1/2 year old son was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder and I'm looking for moms who also have children with SPD. I have read about dietary changes and supplements......anyone have any luck with either?

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Melissa - posted on 09/27/2011

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Anyone have any tips or tricks for potty training a SPD little boy? He is 3. He is asking to go potty, holding it and refusing to potty in his Pull-Up. When placed on the potty (which he just loves), he is scared of the sensation to pee. He won't just let it go. Also, we have tried the standing up thing and he is scared to touch himself. I haven't even began to work on #2 in the potty yet. Any tips or tricks would help.

Mary - posted on 11/21/2008

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Hi, my son also had SPD & ADHD. He was diagnosed w/SPD at age 3 & is now 10. He has come so far & is in a place I thought he'd never be! Staff members at his school come up to me all of the time & tell me what an amazing kid he's become! It's so wonderful to hear. We didn't have luck with diet or supplements - he was a very picky eater. He had OT for years - private & through school. He was released from the private OT 2 years ago - he still has issues with crowds & loud places, but he's come so far. For all of you who are just heading down this path - hang in there, it will get better.

Robin - posted on 03/03/2009

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I have had some friends try some different supplements and diets and they do seem to work a little, but I am not sure that I would go through the expense of it. I know with my son I really try to stay away from a lot of sugar and include fruit and veggies. I water down all of the juice he drinks and try to keep away from any sodas. I have found that the lack of sugar tends to help with his activity and focus. Of course, he is a picky eater so he eats usually the same thing all the time, but the way I see it is if it is working and he is functioning with what he likes then that is what I am going with. It is expensive to do the gluten free diet and I wonder about some of the supplements because it is a market catering to parents with these needs and Autism which is a big business right now. You might want to check with your Doctor. It seems that SPD is getting noticed more and more and more is being updated on it.

Also, this has not related to this topic but AMC theaters are starting to show movies in certain areas for kids that have SPD. You can pull up the information on the AMC theater website. I think the next one is on the 14th of March. It is pretty cool. They have one theater for this event on that day and leave the lights on, turn down the volume and let the kids move around and talk if they need to? I am so happy to see more people noticing this and that it is not just a behavior problem.

Good luck on your findings.
Robin

Robin - posted on 01/22/2009

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I personally have not tried them for my son, but a friend of mine has and said that it did help a bit but it was not what she thought it would help with. I have altered my son's diet to try not to have too much sugar, artificial coloring and so on and I can tell when he does have it. He gets more sensory overload. My son is 5 1/2 and we were told when he was 3. We have a trampoline in his playroom that seems to help with his activity, bean bag chairs, and etc. Sort of a sensory room. That seems to be the best for him. We also had him put in a special needs Pre-K through our school system when he was 3 where he got OT, Speech and more one on one. They also had a sensory room set up. Hope this helps.

Bridget - posted on 12/05/2008

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The joint compressions are a major help. If my son is overwhelmed by an action near him I use that or brushing. He calls the jc's 10's because we count to ten with each joint. The squeezes are for major disturbances or for rewards. When using as rewards I use them mostly for therapy time, he'll get bored and it helps. My son has tempature and texture issues with feeding. Everything has to be a room temp or he will refuse to eat until it is so.

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Stephanie - posted on 08/04/2011

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When your feeling down and out, never give up.
Here's a story of one of those NEVER ENDING DAYS. And everything is going wrong. And you have no more energy nor will power to break up one more fight between the kids. Yeah, one of those days...
It wasn't all bad. Looking back gives you a little different perspective.
I have a step son with FASD, and then sid, adhd, behavior difficulties, no social skills. When he's overstimulated, he goes into overdrive, go as hard and has fast as he can. topping his ADHD, and no impulse control, AND not quite understandg some people aren't as friendly as he is. Yes, i've experienced all those special needs at the same time, and survived. We women know that our hubbies wouldn't been sane after something like that!!
God won't give you anything you can't hanlde.

Melissa - posted on 07/26/2011

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Hello I have 2 little girls....ages 3 and 2 who have Sensory Processing Disorder.

Kim - posted on 03/03/2009

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Hi. I have 2 children with Sensory Intergration Dysfunction(SID) or Sensory Processing Disorder as it is sometimes called. I spent years going to peadiatricians phycologists etc and finally when my son was 4 we got the correct diagnosis. Occupational therepy with someone who specialises in the disorder is the best remedy, it is not cureable but we have have been taught how to manage it. My son has just started in main stream schooling and I am finding that the ony way to handle this is to educate the teachers he has. I had a meeting today with my son's teacher and took her a whole lot of information on the subject, both from the internet & from his Occupational Therapist. Your child will let you know what food he can handle, don't force it. Occupational Therapy is definately the way to go, it saved our lives.

Angela - posted on 01/22/2009

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Hello. My 3 yr old son has spd. He was first diganosed with autism but soon find out it was spd and developmental delays. I have found that a deep pressure vest works miracles. He is a very hyperactive boy and with this vest it helps him calm down. And at night we use a weighted blanket which works GREAT! He tosses and turns and moves everything but with the weighted blanket he is out within 30 mins and very still except moving his arms some because they're not under the blanket.

~Jennifer - posted on 01/14/2009

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Also........There's a great cookbook for gfcf - "The Kid-Friendly ADHD & Autism Cookbook" by Pamela Compart.  Great recipies - every substitution you need to know, and detailed explanatons of how to make it work.  (and it's not a huge book - just very concise and easy to read if you're navigating this diet for the first time)

~Jennifer - posted on 01/14/2009

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Also........There's a great cookbook for gfcf - "The Kid-Friendly ADHD & Autism Cookbook" by Pamela Compart.  Great recipies - every substitution you need to know, and detailed explanatons of how to make it work.  (and it's not a huge book - just very concise and easy to read if you're navigating this diet for the first time)

~Jennifer - posted on 01/14/2009

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http://stewartdehart.stores.yahoo.net/



 



  I've found a lot of good (all gfcf)  pre-packaged mixes, pre-made cookies, calcium substitute and a gfcf chewable vitamin on this site - kinda pricey, but can be worth it / most helpful if you're constantly on-the-go.   



=)  



Hope it can help a few of you like it's helped me...

~Jennifer - posted on 01/14/2009

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http://stewartdehart.stores.yahoo.net/



 



  I've found a lot of good (all gfcf)  pre-packaged mixes, pre-made cookies, calcium substitute and a gfcf chewable vitamin on this site - kinda pricey, but can be worth it / most helpful if you're constantly on-the-go.   



=)  



Hope it can help a few of you like it's helped me...

Brandi - posted on 01/09/2009

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New to this... I have a 6 year old son, soon to be seven.  He was born with a cleft lip. partial cleft palete, club foot and since then was diagnosed with a sensory disorder that is a hyposensitivity.  He was also tongue-tied as well.  We have been through seval surgeries(sp?) and many years of therapy.  We have not tried any special diet with him - he has always been with the 25th percentile for weight.  We tried when he was younger to add pedisure to his milk , a doctor recc., by he did not gain any weight.  He is a great eater!  He is very loving.  He hates loud noises- movies we have to sit in the back row and go in and out of the cinema.  He is trying so hard to talk in snetences that we have a hard time understand.  We did recently get a device for him to take to school to help out.  Imagine holding your tongue to talk and when we can understad- this is what is would should like.



We also struggle with the sensory part of if he will ever be potty- trained.  It seems to be a timing issue, but we can't seem to master it.  Any ideas would be great if anyone has a " master key to the success".

Terri - posted on 01/07/2009

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Hi.. My son has a form of SPD called SID.. it is just MORE MORE MORE SPD ya know!!



he has a bit of autism.. Non verbal for the most part yet.. HE used to talk.. after they delayed his DTAP shot for 6 months.. he had some issues the DR I think stillll is in denial it was from the shot but what ever... HE sadly got a DTAP at 12 months.. then half his words when Bye bye.. at 18 months the 4th DTAP shot was given and alll words were GONE but HI...



HE is MAJOR like I said on sensory!!! he sleeps with a weighted blanket of 15 lbs.. he is only 28 lbs at 3 years old....



No diet has helped.. or meds....



but I did finally get a kiss so I am happy!!

Amy - posted on 12/02/2008

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My OT gave me the impression that the sensory diet was whatever "tools" you have to help your child with their particular sensory issues. Brushing for us brought on nightmarish behavior, and our OT at the time agreed that with the reaction he was having, it was not worth it for us to pursue at the time. What works for our kiddo is jumping and "crashing", joint compressions, tight squeezes, and to some extent swinging, but we only get the good swinging while in OT.

Heather - posted on 11/30/2008

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Has your OT ever mentioned a Sensory Diet. My daughter would not allow me to touch her head or her hands. Shampoo was a nightmare, and I would have to wait for her to go to sleep to cut her nails. We did the Sensory diet, brushing, like they do with children with Autism. It really made a difference, we brushed her arms, back and legs every 90 minutes. It helped with some of her behavioral issues as well. Something with the brushing helps to pull all the out of whack senses in the brain together. I know this is not very technical of an answer, I'm not an OT, I am a mom that is sometime so desperate for help, I'll try anything sometimes, and this really works! I can wash her hair, touch her hands, cut her nails, and cuddling is amazing. It takes a couple weeks of persistent, consistent, brushing, and eventually she asked for it.

Katharine - posted on 11/30/2008

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my seven yr old has spd as well as ocd and add . i have to say changing her diet has really helped. as spd is usually a disorder that will come with other issues or challenges .organic is what we try to give her . and cuttin out glutten .a really good doc web site is dr hoffman he has amazin info on managment. and cause and effects.

Amy - posted on 11/29/2008

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My son has had feeding issues since he was about 15 months (he's now 6).... he likes crunchy things (crackers, toast), and smooth things (yogurt, peanut butter) and he likes fruit (thank goodness for small miracles). He has not touched any type of meat or vegetables since he was a toddler, and it has been theorized it is both because of texture, and the motor control it would take to chew tougher foods like those. He sticks to foods that he can eat with his front teeth, so that he does not have to move food back to his molars and chew the regular way. He was diagnosed with verbal apraxia, although his therapist now says it is just an overall case of dyspraxia and low tone in his cheeks and facial muscles. We have it in our heads to pursue the eating therapy, but it will have to get in line behind the OT and listening therapy, then the vision therapy, if I still have any sanity after all that!

[deleted account]

my son's feeding issue is related to his motor planning problems. He also has low muscle tone in his lower jaw, so when he is tired (for example) he won't "chew". He loves yogurt...it's easy and smooth. I can totally understand sensory issues with food...I hated cottage cheese and oatmeal growing up because of the texture. Who amongst us can honestly say we are completely free of sensory issues? Anyway, he finally mastered a spoon, and can use most any spoon now, but forks are a whole other story. He is still working on the stabbing motion, and has very little control of the fork. The other thing I see working here is that upper body "unawareness" (ok, I made that up) he doesn't cross the midline, doesn't use his other hand. When we are in a restaurant, it actually looks like he is really well mannered. I hope I can remember that (he's 2 and a half) when we work on manners!

[deleted account]

My son just started OT. He goes to a great therapy center. His first therapy is proprioceptive therapy in a sensory gym and then feeding therapy, which I hear is a slow process. Anyone else's kids have a feeding issue from SPD?

Terry - posted on 11/27/2008

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Well for the first time ever I have found where I belong!! After doing a little research I discovered that Sensory Integration Disorder has now been renamed Sensory Processing Disorder. I have a Son who is 11.5 who also has severe ADHD as well. It has been a battle since day one. I am not sure where to begin. This is my first time finally coming across moms that can relate to the things that I have dealt with. Some of the issues like touch and sound have gotten better with time . One of the huge issues we are currently dealing with is trying to stay focussed in school. He is on Concerta right now.

Cynthia - posted on 11/21/2008

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Mary- What type of OT were you able to get through your school? What city/state?



Marie- Have you found anything the teacher has done that was able to help your son be to be more attentive and complete work at school? My sons teacher keeps asking me for ideas & I don't know what to tell her! He is 9 yrs old in 4th grade . He is so smart but is falling behind now.

[deleted account]

What types of steps do you take with school and so forth? My son would be in preschool this year but when he see's other children eat or touches certain crafts,(playdough,etc.) he vomits. He also vomits when exposed to strong smells and scents. He is home schooled but I would love to see him around other children.

Marie - posted on 11/20/2008

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Yes... they call it SPD or SID.... just depends on who you are talking to, but it is the same thing.

Alyn - posted on 11/19/2008

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My 5 year old son was just diagnosed with SPD 9 month ago (right after I had his sister was born). I had read about dietary changes and supplements, but haven't really looked into it. OT helped, but despite graduating we still have a lot of issues. I was told this was becoming more common, glad to hear I am not alone. Have your tried the brushing and joint compressions? My son loves it, but I haven't been able to do it every 2 hours like I am suppose to.

Marie - posted on 11/19/2008

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My bpys all have SPD to some degree and I have decided I have it too. My oldest is also reeally struggling with being attentive and completing work at school. He is n 2nd grade. I think you never really grow out of it, but more learn to adapt. Have any of you tried brushing? I do think it helped my oldest focus when he was younger. We just can't fit it into his day now as easily. "Squishing" seems to be more effective in calming my younger two boys. The youngest of the 4 is only 2 months, but already calms when tightly swaddled. I could go on for a while about it, but I am holding a colicky baby and typing one-handed!

Laura - posted on 11/19/2008

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Semantha, the omega's I use is by Nordic Naturals and they have a website. They have places on their sites for questions. I'm sure you could post your question of possible interactions there.

I have to give you loads of credit to you and any single parent who works on a job and then comes home to work with your kids. Living with them day after day can be something we get used to but not dealing with the politics and struggle of educational/therapy support. I am lucky to be an at home mom and still struggle with getting Ryan the right kind of education/support. It was much easier when we were in the preschool years but now that we are in grade school, we have to start dealing with the general ed academic program. Remember to not be afraid to be an advocate for your kids! They have rights! Never just take what they say at face value if you are in question. Even those not in the autism label could use the advocates we use. Don't be afraid to call them for advice if need be. (Autism Society of America - your regions chapter) Good luck to all who have those special little ones.

Semantha - posted on 11/18/2008

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HI! I have 4 kids, 3 'normal' kids and my special little ball of quirky behavior-Justin. Justin (Or "JB" as I will abbrev to) is 3.5 yo and we didn't really notice anything was off until he had his 1st seizure at 16 mths. Thats when they diagnosed him with developmental delays and told us he was about 1yr behind. I had him screened for Autism and that was neg. Then he had another seizure 8 mths later, then came the anti-seizure meds and the Verbal Apraxia diagnosis. He has been seizure free for 1yr, 8 mths & 14 days...not that I am counting (and praying!). LOL. This past year we also got the Dyspraxia diagnosis, but to be honest he has certain 'quirky' behavior that fits in many different areas. Mild sensory issues (refuses to wear socks unless sneakers on for school, refuses to be covered with a blanket-even on the coldest nights! Hates being dirty or playing in sand, etc). Massages work well with him to calm him when he is hyper or upset, and he loves to read, etc. He actually tests ahead cognatively, so this threw the neuro for a loop, since he couldn't really fit him in a slot. He also has kidney reflux grade 2-3 (mild).



I am delighted to read about the Omega info you ladies are posting, does anyone have a website for the little tiny pills? Any does anyone know anything about the Omegas on a daily basis with interaction to amoxicillin (which he is on for the reflux)?



JB goes to a day program called PLACE (in S. FL) that is hosted in local elementary schools here. It is great!! He has gained alot of skills and knowledge since he started in Feb 08. I am upset we still ahve not found an additional SLP that is willing to work with us on ins adn scheduling issues. I have all the kids in 4 diff schools this year, plus work FT as a single mom, so its really tough to fit everything in a day! Or I was FT, till I got laid off 2 wks ago...but that is a story for another group..LOL



You ladies are all amazing moms, and I love to see how you manage to keep really involved in your kids lives and stay strong. You guys inspire me! -Sam

Laura - posted on 11/18/2008

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ditto on what Mary said. They are gel form and squish when chewed. Ryan calls them his fish eggs. :) I don't know dimensions but they are very small. Smaller than any chewable vitamin. (wish I could take them, mine are huge).

Mary - posted on 11/17/2008

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Hi, I have a 3.5 year old who has been diagnosed with developmental apraxia. He has speech therapy and occupational therapy 3-4 times a week, and so far, has been responding great. I have been reading a lot on supplements and we are starting him on a cocktail of omega 3, 6, 9, DHA, and coconut oil... the Nordic Naturals "little gel ba;;s" that someone spoke of, seem to be great, he loved them! They are pretty small and you can chew or swallow them(to answer Sarah's question,I think a 2.5 year old would do fine with them, it also comes in liquid).

Anyway, i have seen videos on you-tube of children before the supplementation and then a few weeks/ months later, and the strides they make seem to be amazing! All the research I have done on the omega's, whether it be fish oil or vegetable derived, seems great... completely natural "brain food"

I am very anxious to see the results. Has anyone else with an apraxic child tried this?

[deleted account]

Hi, I just wrote a post, but deleted it when it did not make much sense. My boys both responded to the GFCF diet. While they still have minor sensitivities, it is nothing like before. One word of caution about tofu cheeses. There are some that have a small amount of casein. I always call the manufacturers to make sure that they are not just lactose free.

Good luck!
Julie

Sarah - posted on 11/17/2008

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Laura,

How big are the DHA Omega 3 vits? My son is not even 3, I don't think he would know/understand that he has to swallow them.

[deleted account]

Hi. Been keeping up with the group, and it looks like there are a few people here who have similar stories to ours. Jaden was medically diagnosed with Verbal Apraxia and Sensory Processing Disorder as well as some (very much related) developmental delays. He has been in the Early Intervention program here in Illinois since he was about 16 months. He is making great strides, but of course every little advancement is a celebration around here. It sometimes amazes me what I see one week....and then BAM he advances somewhere without any warning...we call it paradigm shifts...like the day or two period when he began to engage in the world around him...I like reading about children like Jaden (who is now a little over two and half and LOOKS 4) who have overcome....thanks to everyone for posting

Laura - posted on 11/17/2008

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Hey Sarah. Just wanted to add that we use Nordic Natural's Children DHA for the omega supplement. It's in the form of these little gel balls. You give 3-4 of them per day. They have them in strawberry flavor but my son just swallows them with some juice. It's alot better than the liquid. Yuck!

Another thing is that if you are interested in some good gf/cf recipes, advice, other people using the diet, there's a cool facebook group. It's listed under gf/cf diets and there's a picture of two chocolate cakes still in the pans as the profile picture. Check it out. Very helpful.

Sarah - posted on 11/17/2008

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Ok, we are Gluten/Dairy free for just over a week now. He is eating everything in front of him. I personally gag at some of these foods (the tofu cheese in particular.) but Owen is actually eating them. He hasn't seemed to mind the change at all, which shocked me because he is a boy who needs consistency. At first we were eating Gluten and he had the same food but his was Gluten free. Now, it's just easier to serve the same food to everyone. I've started serving him diluted veggie/fruit juice mix and he likes it. I put pureed carrots in anything I can disguise them in. He likes his multi vitamins but doesn't care for the Omega 3 version, so I'm hunting for a child friendly version. Some of the premade gluten/dairy free products (ie:chicken nuggets) are quite disgusting so I made them from scratch from the various acceptable flours and he loved them, actually the whole family did. As for progress, it's too soon to tell I guess. His language has been great this week, but behavior / balance, etc. not so great. He's been a bit out of control. He just got his first double ear infection in 2 years since we had PE tubes placed so that could be part of it.



Thanks for everyone's input on what coping mechanisms work for their children. We still haven't found anything that works/helps for Owen yet. He hates massage/touch, doesn't care one way or another for his bean bag chair. But we're still looking. So I happily accept any suggestions.

I ordered a mini trampoline for Christmas so hopefully he'll like that. Because I didn't want to spend the $100+ for a weighted vest (and have him hate it), I found great directions on line to make one so I'm going to try that.

Thanks again!

Bridget - posted on 11/16/2008

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That book is practically my fav!! It has helped me and my family understand so much. My ped neuro recommended it. I also read Quirky Kids for some of the chapters.

Jenny - posted on 11/16/2008

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My 3 1/2 year old son started seeing a speech therapist at 2 for a speech delay. After 7mo of therapy and hitting a road block, he was diagnosed with Sensory Integration Disorder and started seeing an occupational therapist, too. He's now in a PPCD (preschool children with disabilities) program in the local school district. That has been wonderful!

Like many of the other moms have said, my child is a very picky eater, so I'm not really excited about trying special diets. At least not until he can communicate enough to tell us why he won't eat certain things (temperature, texture, flavor, etc). I read the book The Everything Parents Guide to Sensory Integration Disorder. It was very helpful in explaining what's going on in his body and why he reacts the way he does. It also explained why most of the time he seems hyposensitive but occasionally, in certain situations, he reacts hypersensitively. It covers all ages of kids, so I plan to refer back to it many times over the years.

A couple things that we've found to be particularly helpful, at least for us, are chew tubes and a bean bag chair. He use to chew on his shirts and blankets until they were soaking wet and then we got him chew tubes. His OT gave him his first one. When that got lost, we ordered some from an OT supplier online...the name escapes me right now, but I could look it up again. It wasn't an instant fix, but after many months of consistenly offering him the chew tube as an alternative, he doesn't chew on his shirt or blankets anymore! We now use it mostly when he's really upset. We use the bean bag chair to give him good propreceptive input before going somewhere he'll be expected to be still, like church. We'll toss him into it and wrestle with him in it. He loves it and it does help him be calmer...not calm, but calmer.

Amy - posted on 11/11/2008

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My son was diagnosed with SPD and dyspraxia at 18 months (boy was that first year tough!). He has been through all sorts of therapies since then, and we have had amazing luck with it. No diets, though, as he is a picky enough eater that if we limited his diet, he would not eat anything! What works for him is to have vestibular input.... the deep squeezes, jumping on a mini-tramp, jumping or falling into a "crash" pillow. Lately if he gets too upset (he has sensory modulation problems as part of the overall diagnosis of SPD) he can give us a hard five as many times as he needs to. He also liked carrying heavy objects, like gallon jugs of milk. He responded poorly to brushing, and I think it was way too much stim for him.... I've heard that many SPD kids respond poorly the first time, and you just have to keep it up, but the backlash from it was so bad for us that we were not willing to try it again. By the way, my son is now 6, and as he has matured, he has gained better coping skills, but I think there will be aspects of this disorder that will sneak up on him all through life. I have noticed that with intensive therapy, his sensory issues have become very defined..... before he was just overwhelmed by everything, and now it has become pretty specific. Another book to read is "The Sensational Child" by Lucy Jane Miller. She is one of the top researchers of SPD in the nation, and it was at her clinic here in Denver that we saw so much success. "The Out-of-Synch Child" was also excellent. We are about to go for round 2 of therapy for him to deal with the more specific issues that we are having, as well as having him evaluated for autism. It's tough to handle at first, but once you find tricks to help him cope, life becomes quite a bit easier. Good luck!

Laura - posted on 11/11/2008

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My son, Ryan, has autism and one of the many issues they face is SPD. We have him on the gf/cf diet and found a huge increase in conversational skills. Our specialist told me to put him on Omega 3 and found an increase in his attention. It's hard to know which part of his autism it helped so not sure if it will help with someone struggling with specifically SPD. But I will tell you it will not hurt anything either (the omega 3). Worth a try. Another thing, there is a great book out there called "The Out of Sync Child" and "The Out of Sync Child Has Fun". The first is about SPD (in the book it's called Sensory Integration Disorder). The second one is FULL of great activities that work with specific areas of sensory issues that may need work. It's great because they use everyday household items. No need for specialized items. Both books should be available at libraries to check out before buying. Tthe brush that Bridget mentioned and the massaging works great for my son, too.

Nicole - posted on 11/11/2008

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Hi Sarah, how is the diet going? My son will be 4 next week and he is set to be evaluated for SPD. I would be greatly surprised if he were not diagnosed with SPD after reading the information and checklists provided online. Needless to say I am relieved (to put my finger on what is "wrong"!) but very frightened at the same time. That being said, how is the diet plan you are trying working out and where would I find information on this diet?

[deleted account]

my son who is also 2 and a half was diagnosed with SPD and verbal apraxia. I wonder if anyone else's child is as attracted and soothed by books as my child is. He appears to use them almost as a fuzzy blanket to calm himself. My philosphy is always "moderation"...so I was wondering if anyone else has experience with this and what the "outcome" is

Bridget - posted on 11/10/2008

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Also I forgot about his hyperactivity. The best solution I have found for my son is massages! In church if he gets rowdy I massage his arms and legs. I can't touch his back yet, but he loves his sensory brush! At school he uses legs from jeans filled with sand set across his arms or his legs. It helps him relax and pay attention more. Weighted vests can get expensive and he won't wear them. We also do "Squeezes" He'll sit on my lap and I bring his knees to his chest and squeeze him, I use it as a reward for good behavior. At home we have a little gym mat and for good behavior he becomes a burrito! He loves it.

Bridget - posted on 11/10/2008

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My son has SPD. A note to Rasha, my son wears ear muffs. He loves them - it will block out all of the noise. My son was a preemie too. He has autism and mild cp. I have him on a strict diet - no artifical flavors at all. He is very picky about textures so I have to introduce them slowly. His Occupational Therapist helps alot too! In order to cut his hair I use a non-vibrating, non-noise shaver. You can find them online. But the biggest help is his Occupational Therapist.

Amy - posted on 11/09/2008

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Hi! My daughter Molly was born with a number of issues. While we do not have a diagnosis of SPD, she is sensory defensive. She is just now at three putting things in her mouth. She still will not touch anything messy and freaks out if she has to sit down outside. She only weighs 29 pounds so we have always been reluctant to make any dietary changes, but when we have made them, she has done well. There were always a few tough days, but they won't let themselves starve and in the long run, it has always been worth it. She tends to be understimulated so we have had great results from the brushing technique. Hang in there.

Sarah - posted on 11/09/2008

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There is a lot of information out there if you just goodle Gluten Free/Casein Free diets, Autism or ADHD. TACA.com, gfcfdiet.com are just two that I've used. Hope you find them useful. We are only on day 3 of the GF/CF diet, so it's hard to tell so far if it's working. My son has had an amazing language day today......probably just a coincidence but I'll take whatever bit of hope I can get my hands on.

April - posted on 11/09/2008

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Hi everyone. My son (12 going on 13) has central auditory processing disorder. Am I in the right group? From reading some of the posts some things sound familiar to what we have faced so far with him. I too have read about the Omega vitamins. But would be very interested in trying the special diet. Where would I find info on that?

Kristin - posted on 11/08/2008

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Hi there...my almost two year old daughter also has SPD. I'm afraid I don't have much info regarding diet, but I am so relieved to see other people dealing with this. It helps to know I am not alone when we have had a REALLY bad day! Thanks everyone!

Cynthia - posted on 11/06/2008

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My son also has Sensory Processing Disorder.... He is 9 now. We didn't realize exactly what we were dealing with until he was 4. He was born 4 weeks early. We have come along way in dealing with haircuts, tags, socks, smells, food, hugging, swinging, sliding, swimming & finally bike riding! What I am having a problem with now is inattentiveness "tuining everything out" in school... It has been really noticible since 2nd grade (he is in 4th now) and is not really getting much better (like they keep saying it will). He comes home with all these stories of what is going on in school appearing to be really involved but in a normal reality he is gazing off, completing work really slowly. Does anyone out there have any experiance with this or even heard of this in older children with SPD?

Sarah - posted on 11/06/2008

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Our Speech Language Pathologist just mentioned that diet to me yesterday. A friend of hers used it with her son and had success. I am also worried about a diet change now because he eats so little. He used to eat nothing but broccoli but I can't come near him with a vegetable now. He has reduced the number of fruits he'll eat as well. I hate to take away the only foods he'll eat. If you try the Feingold diet and have success let me know.

Jessica - posted on 11/06/2008

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Hi, my 5 year old ds and my two year old dd both have SPD. To be honest, I hve not received much help where we live with them, so I am not sure I can offer much advice. I have been looking into diets as well and am considering the feingold diet, but I haven't decided yet. Both of them eat so little, the diet thing is a little daunting.

Sarah - posted on 11/06/2008

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No, he wasn't premature. His language wasn't developing so we had him see a Speech Language Pathologist who then suggested he also see an Occupational Therapist. He is also very overwhelmed by lights, multiple voices, music, TV, but also things like wetness on his clothes, haircuts, very disorganized and clumsy behavior, very hyper, etc. etc. He is such a loving little boy but I'm at witts end. I hope that he too will grow out of it, but it seems to be getting progressively worse as of late. So, I've been doing some research and have found that diets used for kids with ADD/ADHD as well as Autism have been working on kids with SPD. Specifically those without dairy or Gluten. Also magnesium, B vits, and Omega supplements have shown to help. I hate to give him supplements if I don't need to. Some research suggests that going all natural without any chemicals, preservatives, etc in his diet as well as in our home could help. I think we're going to go that route before I eliminate all Gluten and dairy, since those are the only foods he's eating these days.......yet another joy of SPD. Carrie, have you been using a "Sensory Diet"? Owen seems to like the heavy lifting, pulling type of activities but they don't seem to calm his nervous system any.

Thank you both for responding. I will think optimistically and hope that my son will also grow out of this.:)

Rasha - posted on 11/05/2008

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Just wondering if your son was a preemie? My son was and at that age he had several issues with sound, lights, multiple voices; I couldn't take him shopping at all, he would cry and have very bad tantrums. His pediatrician suggested it may have to do with him being a preemie but he was never diagnosed with anything, thankfully he has somewhat grown out of it, we can still not listen to music in the car and he is 4 years old now. Good luck

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