Night Terrors?

Jennifer - posted on 08/10/2009 ( 12 moms have responded )

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My daughter will be 4 this November and I just recently went back to work after having a baby boy in May. My daughter finally stopped using her binky and she has starting getting night terrors, has anyone else delt with night terrors? What causes them? How can you prevent them?

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Stacey - posted on 10/08/2009

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My son had them around the age of 1 1/2. His were caused by a common cold medicine~ "Pediacare" Once off, his stopped. Like others have stated, they don't remember them so that is a comfort~ rather than a nightmare where many times they do remember and are very frightened the next day.

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Tanya - posted on 10/08/2010

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You - posted yesterday, 9:46 pm

I am a mother that has survived 'Night Terrors' my "middle" daughter is now 9 and had night terrors from approx 8-10months old until she was 6 nearly 7 years old and they were nightly, there were no breaks or nights off, it was every night between 11.10pm and 1.30am. Whilst on holidays we had security called on us because the prople in the room next to us thought we were abusing our daughter. They are awful, scary and hurtful. You feel totally helpless and useless because you cant ease their terror/fears. But hang in there, you do have options. I did a lot of research back when there wasn't much around.
I spent a lot (wasted) time and money on Doctors, Paesiatricians, Paediatricians who supposedly specialised in night terrors, herbal remedies, music, this and that all for nothing. I was told, she will grow out of it, try giving her this, try doing that. None of it worked, Phernergan - mild anthistamine/sedative they give children for allergies to help them relax or sleep had the adverse effect. I was litterally at my wits end and I know that it had a part to play in the break up of my first marriage. Sleep Deprevation will damage even the strongest of relationships over time. The night terrors will effect your childs behaviour, immune system, digestion and nervous systems you need to consider everything. Diet, intollerances, allergies, energy levels.
My first point of advice is make a diary or all food and fluids taken with what preservatives and sugars etc are in those foods, what activities and how their behaviour is. Do this for a 4 week period religiously, this will give you a true indication of when the changes start happening and you can always refer back to the diary when discussing the situation with your doctor/paediatrician/health carer etc.
Have a look at a book called 'Fed Up' by Sue Dengate. She has specialised in food intollerances and allergies there is a lot of merrit in the research she has done and the results she has found. There is a section or reference to 'Night Terrors' and this was part of my solution, I can not guarantee any of this will work for your child but it is worth a try and won't hurt them, even if you think it might be drastic. I have tried this method and perseveared and it worked in 7 days.

When my daughter was 6 as a last resort before giving her tranquilisers I took her to see a Natropath/Homeopath, I had never seen or spoken to one myself so I was a little sceptical to say the least, but I had not other options left. He took a blood analysis, iridology test general questions. He placed her on a strict 90 day food plan, where she had to irradicate all sugars and Yeast/wheat from her diet. My daughter was barely at minimum weight for her age anyway and I had real concerns for her weight and health on this food plan. It was the same food plan that is given for sufferers of 'Candiasis Albicans' or 'Systemic Candiasis' which is basically too much of the Thrush bacteria in the blood system. She had only ever had thrush as an infant at 6 weeks old that she got from her normal position coming through the birth canal. Anyway, it had been in her bood system for that long it caused problems in all the above areas I mentioned especially her digestive sytem and led to 'leaky gut'syndrome. I am telling you all this in so much detail because 'Night Terrors' are not straight forward or easily explained. Some children never grow out of them.
We had to be creative with her food, and make a lot of changes as Natural Sugars that are found in fruit and dairy (anything ending in 'ose' glucose, sucrose, lactose etc.etc) was out completely as it takes the full 90days to kill the organisms and its spores in the blood system. It was hard work, but we did it.
My daughters firs night of sound sleep occurred 7 nights later, my second husband and I didn't sleep at all as we were still expecting her to wake and go through the now normal routine, but she didn't. Almost immediately her personality changed, she was happier, no more massive mood swings, no more always being tired and grumpy. She is a different kid and such an absolute pleasure.
We maintain a 'Detox' for 1 week every 3-6 months depending on how she is feeling and behaving. We maintain the vitamins, probiotics and limit the sugars and yeast/intake. This worked for us and I hope if you can give it a try it will work for you. Good Luck.
There is light at the end of the tunnel.

Melissa - posted on 10/22/2009

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My 7 year old son had night terrors on and off for about a year, they were really scary. We finally started praying over him everytime that these would start, and he hasn't had one since. What can I say, God is bigger than the Boogieman.

Sara - posted on 10/21/2009

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My son had these for quite a while, he has only stopped for a couple months now. Google it, you can find a lot of information. It can be cause by a few different things. I figured that my son's were caused from not getting enough sleep. Your supposed to just watch as they are going through to make sure they don't hurt themselves. They are sound asleep through the whole thing even though they look awake. Waking them only scares them because it can scare them and make then more freaked out. My husband used to wake our son and he's be frantic trying to get away bevause he had no clue what was going on. Try this site, it seems to explain thing staight to the point, pretty easy to understand. Good luck! http://www.babycenter.com/0_night-terror...

Sylvie - posted on 10/13/2009

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My son gets them whenever he's overtired and to much has gone on through the day, or when he's coming up with a cold and while he's sick. The thing about a true night terror, it's best to leave them alone(with you watching or being close by so s/he doesn't get hurt) They don't see you or know your there most of the time. Thats why they hit and trash around, they try to push or run away whatever scares them in their dream, and when they see you go to them thei see what they are running from. So just talk/whisper to them to let them know you're there until they wake up. If it's more like a confusional arousal then you can try to pick them up and try to calm them down, but don't approach to fast. Hope that helped.

Amie - posted on 10/13/2009

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My little girl is now 5 and suffers less from night terrors but at the same age as your daughter she was a regular suffer of night terrors. They are very different from nightmares and very scarey. I was told that some of the causes were being over stimulated during the day, being over tired or going through a growth spurt. I was also told they usually happen about the same time each night so to avoid it you can wake your child before this time. I didn't like the idea so never did it. Instead I would talk to her and sometimes (between the screams and grasping at invisible objects) she would talk back. I would try and talk her into being in a happy place. Not sure if it really helped her but it made me feel better.

Allison - posted on 10/10/2009

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my 4 year old daughter hits and kicks and screams during her terrors, the only thing that works is i pick her up gently, and walk around the house whispering ideas of things to do. we walk outside and look at the stars and then sit on the porch, etc. she slowly comes out of it and is then just confused so i pour her a glass of water and we talk about her bad dreams, or if she cant remember them we whisper about how we need to get back to bed cause its so late, and shes fine.

Paula - posted on 09/28/2009

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Hey, my daughter had night terrors when she was about 2 years old and the pediatrician told me that the most important thing was to make sure that she wouldn't hurt hurself. This sounds really simple, but it was hard to do because she wouldn't allow us to touch her and was in such a deep sleep that she had no idea of her surroundings. I would just hold her tight, even against her will, until she calmed down which would sometimes take very long... Eventually they stopped and she hasn't had them (knock on wood!) for a while.

Just last week I was talking with someone who has a son with night terrors, and she actually consulted a child psychologist about it, who then advised her that water helps. Apparently, if you change the environment, it will calm them and wake them from their sleep. So what she started doing was running water so that her son would hear the sound, and then soothe him with a damp, warm cloth until he calmed down. I never tried it myself, but will if it ever happens again.

It's a terrible feeling, to not know how to calm a child... Good luck!

Shannon - posted on 09/28/2009

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My oldest use to have themstarting at age 2. It use to scare me to death. They are sleeping through it and don't remember it even though they are looking at you with wide open eyes and don't seem to be sleeping. Just keep her safe such as cleared walkway so if she runs she doesn't trip and hurt herself and gently voiced direct her back to bed. My daughter grew out of it before she went to kindergarten. Good luck. It's scarier for you than for her, believe it or not. She doesn't rmember, but you as a mom want to make it all better.

Melissa - posted on 09/10/2009

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Yes, disturbed schedule, overstimulated, big changes! Usually occurs 1-2 hours after bed time. We turn the light on to wake him and just be there lovingly for support. He has no idea whats happening, dont bring it up the next day. Try not to over do stimulas and disrupt sleep schedule!

Caroline - posted on 09/05/2009

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My son has problems some nights too. I will hear him wake up and call out for me. Last night he was really crying saying Daddy left us, daddy left us all alone! His dad has been gone for 2 years, he sees him several times a week, and this is the first time this nightmare has come up, but he has had others. I just went to him and rubbed his back and told him it was ok, mom was here and he would see dad soon. He calmed down and never woke up and never spoke of it in the morning.

Vicky - posted on 08/10/2009

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The sad thing is you can't stop them, the good thing is, they don't remember in the morning, even tho she will be asleep, let her know you are there, if she is trying to climb the wall, grab her and give her a big hug and wisper stuff in her ear and you will find it may settle her and you can put her back to bed and she wont know any different in the morning. It's hard to see your baby go through it, but, it's true....mum's love can fix just about anything, good luck

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